60th (2/2nd London) Division

The 60th (2/2nd London) Division was an infantry division of the British Army raised during World War I. The division was the second of two second-line Territorial Force divisions formed from the surplus of London recruits in 1914. Originally the division merely supplied the first-line Territorial divisions with drafts to replace losses through casualties. It was not until late 1915 that the division began to be equipped for field operations and it was not sent overseas to France until mid-1916. As a "lesser" division it was sent to the minor fronts of Salonika and finally Palestine. In mid-1918, most British battalions were replaced with Indian battalions and sent to the Western Front, the division effectively became a British Indian Army division.

Its engagements included the Third Battle of Gaza, the Battle of Beersheba (1917), the Battle of Jerusalem (1917), the Second Transjordan attack on Shunet Nimrin and Es Salt (1918), the Battle of Megiddo (1918), the Battle of Sharon (1918), and the Battle of Nahr el Faliq.

The divisional insignia was a bee.

60th (2/2nd London) Division
British 60th (London) Division Insignia
Active31 August 1914 – 31 May 1919
Country United Kingdom
Branch British Army
TypeInfantry
SizeDivision
EngagementsWorld War I
Third Battle of Gaza
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Edward Bulfin

Formation

120917 Jerusalem surrender monument
Monument to the December 9, 1917, surrender of Jerusalem to the 60th London Division.
179th (2/4th London) Brigade

In June 1918 three battalions were replaced by the 2nd Battalion, 19th Punjabis, 2nd Battalion, 127th Baluchis and 3rd Battalion, 151st Punjabi Rifles.

180th (2/5th London) Brigade

In July 1918 three battalions were replaced by the 2nd Battalion, 30th Punjabis, 1st Battalion, 50th Kumaon Rifles and 2nd Battalion, Guides Infantry.

181st (2/6th London) Brigade

In June 1918 three battalions were replaced by the 2nd Battalion, 97th Deccan Infantry, 130th Baluchis and 2nd Battalion, 152nd Punjabis.

Engagements

Macedonian Campaign 1917

Sinai and Palestine Campaign 1917

1918

General Officer Commanding

See also

External links

  • Baker, Chris. "The 60th (2/2nd London) Division in 1914-1918". The Long, Long Trail. Retrieved 24 June 2015.
151st Sikh Infantry

The 151st Sikh Infantry – also designated 151st Punjabi Rifles, see nomenclature (below) – was an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. It was formed in Mesopotamia and Palestine in May 1918, saw active service in the First World War and the Third Anglo-Afghan War, and was disbanded in May 1921.

152nd Punjabis

The 152nd Punjabis was an infantry regiment of the British Indian Army. It was formed in Mesopotamia and Palestine in May 1918, saw service in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign in the First World War, and was disbanded in September 1921.

155th Pioneers

The 155th Pioneers was a pioneer regiment of the British Indian Army. It was formed in Mesopotamia and Palestine in May and June 1918, saw service in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign in the First World War, and was disbanded in 1920.

179th (2/4th London) Brigade

The 179th (2/4th London) Brigade was a formation of the British Army during the First World War. It was assigned to the 60th (2/2nd London) Division and served in the Middle East. Raised by Colonel, later Brigadier-General, Ned Baird.

180th (2/5th London) Brigade

The 180th (2/5th London) Brigade was a formation of the British Army during the First World War. It was assigned to the 60th (2/2nd London) Division and served in the Middle East.

181st (2/6th London) Brigade

The 181st (2/6th London) Brigade was a formation of the British Army during the First World War. It was assigned to the 60th (2/2nd London) Division and served in the Middle East.

1st South Western Mounted Brigade

The 1st South Western Mounted Brigade was a formation of the Territorial Force of the British Army, organised in 1908. By 1915 its regiments had been posted away so it was broken up; it never saw active service as a brigade. The Headquarters may have formed the HQ for 2/1st Southern Mounted Brigade.

60th Division

In military terms, 60th Division may refer to:

Infantry divisions60th (2/2nd London) Division

60th Division (People's Republic of China)

60th Infantry Division (France)

60th Infantry Division (Germany)

60 Infantry Division Sabratha (Italy)

60th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)Armoured divisions60th Tank Division (1941–1942) (USSR)

60th Tank Division (1965–1989) (USSR)

74th (Yeomanry) Division

The 74th (Yeomanry) Division was a Territorial Force infantry division formed in Palestine in early 1917 from three dismounted yeomanry brigades. It served in the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of the First World War, mostly as part of XX Corps. In May 1918 it was sent to the Western Front where it remained until the end of the war.

The division's insignia was a broken spur to signify that its units were once mounted but now served as infantry.

Battle of Jerusalem

The Battle of Jerusalem occurred during the British Empire's "Jerusalem Operations" against the Ottoman Empire, when fighting for the city developed from 17 November, continuing after the surrender until 30 December 1917, to secure the final objective of the Southern Palestine Offensive during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I. Before Jerusalem could be secured, two battles were recognised by the British as being fought in the Judean Hills to the north and east of the Hebron–Junction Station line. These were the Battle of Nebi Samwill from 17 to 24 November and the Defence of Jerusalem from 26 to 30 December 1917. They also recognised within these Jerusalem Operations, the successful second attempt on 21 and 22 December 1917 to advance across the Nahr el Auja, as the Battle of Jaffa, although Jaffa had been occupied as a consequence of the Battle of Mughar Ridge on 16 November.This series of battles was successfully fought by the British Empire's XX Corps, XXI Corps, and the Desert Mounted Corps against strong opposition from the Yildirim Army Group's Seventh Army in the Judean Hills and the Eighth Army north of Jaffa on the Mediterranean coast. The loss of Jaffa and Jerusalem, together with the loss of 50 miles (80 km) of territory during the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) advance from Gaza, after the capture of Beersheba, Gaza, Hareira and Sheria, Tel el Khuweilfe and the Battle of Mughar Ridge, constituted a grave setback for the Ottoman Army and the Ottoman Empire.As a result of these victories, British Empire forces captured Jerusalem and established a new strategically strong fortified line. This line ran from well to the north of Jaffa on the maritime plain, across the Judean Hills to Bireh north of Jerusalem, and continued eastwards of the Mount of Olives. With the capture of the road from Beersheba to Jerusalem via Hebron and Bethlehem, together with substantial Ottoman territory south of Jerusalem, the city was secured. On 11 December, General Edmund Allenby entered the Old City on foot through the Jaffa Gate instead of horse or vehicles to show respect for the holy city. He was the first Christian in many centuries to control Jerusalem, a city held holy by three great religions. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, David Lloyd George described the capture as "a Christmas present for the British people". The battle was a great morale boost for the British Empire.

Battle of Tell 'Asur

The Battle of Tell 'Asur, known as the Action of Tell 'Asur also known as the Battle of Turmus 'Aya, took place between 8 and 12 March 1918, after the decisive victory at the Battle of Jerusalem and the Capture of Jericho during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign of World War I. Fighting took place over an area which extended from the Mediterranean to Abu Tellul and Mussalabeh on the edge of the Jordan Valley.

After the Capture of Jericho by the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) in February 1918 the occupation of the Jordan Valley began. However, the captured territory was not sufficiently broad to provide a strong enough base for the planned Transjordan operations. The EEF's front line was successfully pushed northwards following attacks by the XX and XXI Corps against the Ottoman Seventh Army and Eighth Army. At the end of March the First Transjordan attack on Amman was launched to be followed the next month by the Second Transjordan attack on Shunet Nimrin and Es Salt.

British Salonika Army

The British Salonika Army was a field army of the British Army during World War I.

John Shea (Indian Army officer)

General Sir John Stuart Mackenzie Shea, (1869–1966) was a British officer in the Indian Army.

List of British divisions in World War I

List of military divisions — List of British divisions in World War I

This page is a list of British divisions that existed in World War I. Divisions were either infantry or cavalry. Divisions were categorised as being 'Regular Army' (professional), 'Territorial Force' (part-time) or 'New Army' (wartime). The 'Territorial' cavalry was referred to as Yeomanry.

Lucknow Brigade

The Lucknow Brigade was an infantry brigade of the British Indian Army formed in 1907 as a result of the Kitchener Reforms. It was mobilized as 22nd (Lucknow) Brigade at the outbreak of the First World War as part of Indian Expeditionary Force E. It served in Egypt in 1915 before being broken up in January 1916.

The brigade was reformed in India in 1917 for internal security duties and to aid the expansion of the Indian Army in the last year of the war. It remained part of the British Indian Army between the wars under several designations and was the 6th (Lucknow) Infantry Brigade in September 1939.

Ned Baird

Brigadier-General Edward William David Baird (29 June 1864 – 8 August 1956), known as Ned Baird, was a cavalry officer in the regular British Army and the reserve Territorial Force. Following service in the army, he became a successful horse trainer, winning the Grand National and the St. Leger. He was also a steward at the Jockey Club, a Deputy Lieutenant and a Justice of the Peace.

Westminster Dragoons

The Westminster Dragoons (WDs) is central London’s only Army Reserve cavalry subunit. One of the Royal Yeomanry's six squadrons, the squadron's current role is light cavalry: to provide a rapidly deployable force with fast mobility and substantial firepower in support of operations. Formed in the aftermath of Second Boer War as part of the County of London Yeomanry, the WDs fought in the Battle of Gallipoli and led British forces onto the beaches during the Normandy Invasion in 1944. The squadron most recently saw action on Operation Telic, when it was mobilised for the 2003 war in Iraq and again in 2006 for peace support operations there. Soldiers and officers of the squadron have also deployed as individual replacements on Operation Herrick in Afghanistan.

XII Corps (United Kingdom)

XII Corps was an army corps of the British Army that fought in the First and Second World Wars. In the First World War, it formed part of the British Salonika Force on the Macedonian front. In the Second World War, it formed part of the British Second Army during Operation Overlord and the subsequent North-West Europe Campaign of 1944-45.

XX Corps (United Kingdom)

The XX Corps was an army corps of the British Army during World War I.

Divisions of the British Army

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