5 krooni

The 5 krooni banknote (5 EEK) is a denomination of the Estonian kroon, the former currency of Estonia. Paul Keres (1916–1975), who was a world-famous Estonian chess player, international Grandmaster and prominent chess theorist, is featured with an engraved portrait on the obverse.

The reverse features Hermann Castle founded in 1256 by the Danes and Ivangorod Fortress established by Ivan III in 1492. The 5 krooni banknote was only issued shortly after the reestablishment of the Estonian state in 1991, but remained in common use until the EEK was replaced by the euro. A 5 krooni coin was also minted but the banknote was more commonly found in circulation. The note can be exchanged indefinitely at the currency museum of Eesti Pank for €0.32.

EEK-5krooni-front
Obverse of the 5 krooni bill
EEK-5krooni-rear
Reverse of the 5 krooni bill

History of the banknote

  • 1991: first series issued by the Bank of Estonia;
  • 1992: second series issued;
  • 1994: third series issued;
  • 2011: withdrawn from circulation and replaced by the euro

Security features

Source: [1]

  • 1991;1992
  1. The watermark of the three lions is visible when the note is horizontal, but springs to life when the note is held against the light. The watermark is in two parts on the edges of the note.
  2. Each note contains a security thread.
  3. The portraits are printed in the main colour of the note and their raised surface can be felt with the fingertips.
  4. Each note has an individual serial number. The horizontal number on the left is printed in black and the vertical number on the right is printed in a different colour on each denomination.
  5. When the note is held at an angle to the light, the denomination of the note can be seen.
  • 1994
  1. New colour tints have been used in these areas.
  2. Silver ink has been incorporated into the note.
  3. A new style serial number appears on the right-hand side, in a different colour for each denomination.
  4. When the note is held up to the light, printed areas on the back of the note fill the unprinted areas on the front of the note.

See also

External links

Culture of Estonia

The culture of Estonia combines an indigenous heritage, represented by the country's Finnic national language Estonian, with Nordic cultural aspects. The culture of Estonia is considered to be largely influenced by Germanic culture, having grown out of it. Due to its history and geography, Estonia's culture has also influenced by the traditions of the adjacent area's Baltic Finns, Baltic Germans and Slavs, as well as by cultural developments in the former dominant powers, Sweden, Denmark and Russia. Traditionally, Estonia has been seen as an area of rivalry between western and eastern Europe on many levels. An example of this geopolitical legacy is an exceptional combination of multiple nationally-recognized Christian traditions: Western Christianity (the Catholic Church and the Estonian Evangelical Lutheran Church) and Eastern Christianity (the Orthodox Church (the Estonian Apostolic Orthodox Church)). The symbolism of the border or meeting of east and west in Estonia was well illustrated on the reverse side of the 5 krooni note. Like the mainstream cultures in the other Nordic countries, Estonian culture can be seen to build upon ascetic environmental realities and traditional livelihoods, a heritage of comparatively widespread egalitarianism arising out of practical reasons (see freedom to roam and universal suffrage), and the ideals of closeness to nature and self-sufficiency.

Estonian kroon

The kroon (sign: kr; code: EEK) was the official currency of Estonia for two periods in history: 1928–1940 and 1992–2011. Between 1 January and 14 January 2011, the kroon circulated together with the euro, after which the euro became the sole legal tender in Estonia. The kroon was subdivided into 100 cents (senti; singular sent). The word kroon (Estonian pronunciation: [ˈkroːn], “crown”) is related to that of the Nordic currencies (such as the Swedish krona and the Danish and Norwegian krone) and derived from the Latin word corona ("crown"). The kroon succeeded the mark in 1928 and was in use until the Soviet invasion in 1940 and Estonia's subsequent incorporation into the Soviet Union when it was replaced by the Soviet ruble. After Estonia regained its independence, the kroon was reintroduced in 1992.

Paul Keres

Paul Keres ([ˈpɑu̯l ˈkeres]; January 7, 1916 – June 5, 1975) was an Estonian chess grandmaster and chess writer. He was among the world's top players from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s.

Keres narrowly missed a chance at a world championship match on five occasions. He won the 1938 AVRO tournament, which led to negotiations for a title match against champion Alexander Alekhine, but the match never took place due to World War II. After the war Keres was runner-up in the Candidates' Tournament on four consecutive occasions.

Due to these and other strong results, many chess historians consider Keres one of the greatest players in history, and the strongest player never to become world champion. He was nicknamed "Paul the Second", "The Eternal Second" and "The Crown Prince of Chess". Keres, Viktor Korchnoi and Alexander Beliavsky defeated nine world champions—more than anyone else in history.

Estonian currency and coinage
Topics
Euro
Former Estonian Coins
Former Estonian banknotes

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