52nd Army (Soviet Union)

The 52nd Army was a field army of the Red Army of the Soviet Union in World War II, formed twice.

52nd Army
ActiveI Formation: 1941 II Formation: 1941–1946
CountrySoviet Union
BranchRed Army
TypeField army
EngagementsWorld War II
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Konstantin Koroteev

History

It was created on 25 August 1941 from the headquarters of the 25th Rifle Corps and defended north of Novgorod. On 26 September 1941, the 52nd Army headquarters was used to form the 4th Army (II Formation). The 52nd Army headquarters was reestablished on 28 September 1941. In May 1943, the army was moved to control of the Reserve of the Supreme High Command (Stavka Reserve). Stavka released the 52nd Army to subordination of the Steppe Front in July 1943, and the 52nd Army thereafter fought in Ukraine, southern Poland, southeastern Germany, and finally in northern Czechoslovakia.

The army took part in the following operations:

1941
Tikhvin Defensive Operation
1942
Tikhvin Offensive
Lyuban Offensive Operation
1943
Chernigov-Poltava Offensive
Cherkassy Offensive
1944
Kirovograd Offensive
Korsun–Shevchenkovsky Offensive
Uman-Botoshany Offensive
RIAN archive 608409 Issue of newspaper "Battle Red Army" of 52nd Army from June 17, 1944
Front cover of the 52nd Army newspaper issue of 17 June 1944
Iassy-Kishinev Operation
1945
Sandomierz–Silesian Offensive
Lower Silesian Offensive
Berlin Offensive, (including the Battle of Bautzen)
Prague Offensive
RIAN archive 608409 Issue of newspaper "Battle Red Army" of 52nd Army from June 17, 1944
Front cover of the 52nd Army newspaper issue of 17 June 1944

On 3 April 1945 the 52nd Army comprised the 7th Guards Mechanised Corps, the 48th Rifle Corps (116th and 294th Rifle Divisions), the 73rd Rifle Corps (50th, 111th and 254th Rifle Divisions) and the 78th Rifle Corps (31st, 214th and 373rd Rifle Divisions), the 213th Rifle Division, the 214th Tank Regiment, two artillery units, and service units.[1]

At the beginning of the Battle of Bautzen, on April 21, 1945, the Germans drove in between the Polish 2nd Army and the 52nd Army around Bautzen, some 40 kilometers (25 mi) north-east of Dresden and 25 kilometers (16 mi) west of Görlitz, sweeping the Soviet units of the 48th Rifle Corps, and driving towards Spremberg.[2] Major General M. K. Puteiko, commander of the 52nd Army's 254th Rifle Division of the 73rd Rifle Corps was mortally wounded around Bautzen.[3] Subsequently, the 52nd Army took part in the advance on Prague with the 1st Ukrainian Front.

Postwar, the army was moved to Poland with its headquarters in Kraków. It soon moved to western Ukraine, with its headquarters at Drohobych. On 12 June 1946 the army was converted into the 8th Tank Army and its headquarters moved to Zhytomyr. The 48th and 78th Rifle Corps were disbanded, along with the 31st, 111th, 116th, 213th, 214th, and 373rd Rifle Divisions. The 73rd Rifle Corps was transferred to the 13th Army.[4]

Commanders

The army was commanded by the following generals.[4]

  • Aug 1941 to Jan 1942 - Nikolai Klykov[5]
  • Jan 1942 to Jul 1943 - Vsevolod Yakovlev
  • Jul 1943 to June 1946 - Konstantin Koroteev

References

  1. ^ http://niehorster.org/012_ussr/45-04-03_Berlin/Army_52.html
  2. ^ Stanisław Komornicki (1967). Poles in the battle of Berlin. Ministry of National Defense Pub. p. 131. Retrieved 10 May 2011.
  3. ^ Aleksander A. Maslov; David M. Glantz (30 September 1998). Fallen Soviet generals: Soviet general officers killed in battle, 1941–1945. Taylor & Francis. p. 180. ISBN 978-0-7146-4346-5. Retrieved 12 May 2011.
  4. ^ a b Feskov et al 2013, pp. 468–469.
  5. ^ David M. Glantz (2005). Companion to Colussus Reborn. University Press of Kansas. p. 97.
  • Feskov, V.I.; Golikov, V.I.; Kalashnikov, K.A.; Slugin, S.A. (2013). Вооруженные силы СССР после Второй Мировой войны: от Красной Армии к Советской [The Armed Forces of the USSR after World War II: From the Red Army to the Soviet: Part 1 Land Forces] (in Russian). Tomsk: Scientific and Technical Literature Publishing. ISBN 9785895035306.

External links

Armed Forces of Turkmenistan

The Armed Forces of Turkmenistan (Turkmen: Türkmenistanyň Ýaragly Güýçleri, Түркменистаның Яраглы Гүйчлери) is the national military of Turkmenistan, consisting of the Army, Air Force and Air Defense Forces, Navy, Border Troops, Internal Troops and a National Guard. After the fall of the Soviet Union, significant elements of the Soviet Armed Forces Turkestan Military District remained on Turkmen soil, including several motor rifle divisions. In June 1992, the new Russian government signed a bilateral defence treaty with Turkmenistan, encouraging the new Turkmen government to create its own armed forces but stipulating that they were to be placed under joint command.The Library of Congress Country Studies said that 'the Treaty on Joint Measures signed by Russia and Turkmenistan in July 1992 provided for the Russian Federation to act as guarantor of Turkmenistan's security and made former Soviet army units in the republic the basis of the new national armed forces. The treaty stipulated that, apart from border troops and air force and air defense units remaining under Russian control, the entire armed forces would be under joint command, which would gradually devolve to exclusive command by Turkmenistan over a period of ten years. For a transitional period of five years, Russia would provide logistical support and pay Turkmenistan for the right to maintain special installations, while Turkmenistan would bear the costs of housing, utilities, and administration.'

The Centre for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies's Moscow Defence Brief said that '..[i]n 1992-1993 Turkmenistan attempted to create a small national armed force based on the former 52nd Army (Soviet Union), which was located in the country and depended on support from Russia. Of the 300 formations and units, numbering 110,000 people, 200 were transferred to the command of Turkmenistan, 70 remained under Russia's jurisdiction, and 30 were either withdrawn or demobilized.

In 1994, the chief of staff and first deputy minister of defense was Major General Annamurat Soltanov, a career officer who had served in Cuba and Afghanistan; another deputy minister of defense, Major General Begdzhan Niyazov, had been a law enforcement administrator prior to his appointment. Russian commanders included Major General Viktor Zavarzin, chief of staff and first deputy commander of the Separate Combined-Arms Army of Turkmenistan, and commander of the Separate Combined-Arms Army of Turkmenistan and deputy minister of defense Lieutenant General Nikolai Kormiltsev. Russian Major General Vladislav Shunevich served together with Turkmen Major General Akmurad Kabulov as joint commanders of the border troops in the Turkmen Border Guard.

'..Turkmenistan consistently has refused to join multilateral CIS military groupings, but Russia maintains joint command of the three motorized rifle divisions in the Turkmenistani army. Under a 1993 bilateral military cooperation treaty, some 2,000 Russian officers serve in Turkmenistan on contract, and border forces (about 5,000 in 1995) are under joint Russian and Turkmenistani command. Altogether, about 11,000 Russian troops remained in Turkmenistan in mid-1996.' From V.I. Feskov et al. 2013 and Michael Holm's data, it appears that the three divisions were the 58th, 88th, and 209th District Training Centre (former 61 Training MRD) at Ashkhabad.

Jane's Information Group said in 2009 that "Turkmenistan's military is, even by the standards of Central Asia, poorly maintained and funded."

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