50th meridian west

The meridian 50° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Greenland, the Atlantic Ocean, South America, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 50th meridian west forms a great circle with the 130th meridian east.

Line across the Earth
50°
50th meridian west

From Pole to Pole

Starting at the North Pole and heading south to the South Pole, the 50th meridian west passes through:

Co-ordinates Country, territory or sea Notes
90°0′N 50°0′W / 90.000°N 50.000°W Arctic Ocean
83°40′N 50°0′W / 83.667°N 50.000°W Lincoln Sea
82°48′N 50°0′W / 82.800°N 50.000°W  Greenland Beaumont Island
82°46′N 50°0′W / 82.767°N 50.000°W Lincoln Sea
82°31′N 50°0′W / 82.517°N 50.000°W  Greenland Wulff Land
82°1′N 50°0′W / 82.017°N 50.000°W Sherard Osborn Fjord
81°53′N 50°0′W / 81.883°N 50.000°W  Greenland
62°18′N 50°0′W / 62.300°N 50.000°W Atlantic Ocean
1°42′N 50°0′W / 1.700°N 50.000°W  Brazil Amapá — mainland and the island of Bailique
0°56′N 50°0′W / 0.933°N 50.000°W Atlantic Ocean Mouth of the Amazon River
0°18′N 50°0′W / 0.300°N 50.000°W  Brazil Pará — islands of Caviana and Marajó, and the mainland
Tocantins — from 9°15′S 50°0′W / 9.250°S 50.000°W
Goiás — from 13°3′S 50°0′W / 13.050°S 50.000°W
Minas Gerais — from 18°36′S 50°0′W / 18.600°S 50.000°W
São Paulo — from 19°56′S 50°0′W / 19.933°S 50.000°W
Paraná — from 22°55′S 50°0′W / 22.917°S 50.000°W
Santa Catarina — from 26°1′S 50°0′W / 26.017°S 50.000°W
Rio Grande do Sul — from 28°27′S 50°0′W / 28.450°S 50.000°W
Santa Catarina — for about 11 km from 29°8′S 50°0′W / 29.133°S 50.000°W
Rio Grande do Sul — from 29°13′S 50°0′W / 29.217°S 50.000°W
29°44′S 50°0′W / 29.733°S 50.000°W Atlantic Ocean
60°0′S 50°0′W / 60.000°S 50.000°W Southern Ocean
77°12′S 50°0′W / 77.200°S 50.000°W Antarctica Claimed by both  Argentina (Argentine Antarctica) and  United Kingdom (British Antarctic Territory)

See also

130th meridian east

The meridian 130° east of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Asia, Australia, the Indian Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 130th meridian east forms a great circle with the 50th meridian west.

1979 Atlantic hurricane season

The 1979 Atlantic hurricane season was the first season to include both male and female names, as well as the common six-year rotating lists of tropical cyclone names. The season officially began on June 1, and lasted until November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic basin. It was slightly below average, with nine systems reaching tropical storm intensity. The first system, an unnumbered tropical depression, developed north of Puerto Rico on June 9. Two days later, Tropical Depression One formed and produced severe flooding in Jamaica, with 40 deaths and about $27 million (1979 USD) in damage. Tropical Storm Ana caused minimal impact in the Lesser Antilles. Hurricane Bob spawned tornadoes and produced minor wind damage along the Gulf Coast of the United States, primarily in Louisiana, while the remnants caused flooding, especially in Indiana. Tropical Storm Claudette caused extensive flooding, due to torrential rainfall. There were two deaths and damaged totaled $750 million.

The most intense tropical cyclone of the season was Hurricane David. It moved across the Lesser Antilles in late August, with the worst hit islands being Dominica and Martinique. The storm then strengthened further and struck Dominican Republic as a Category 5 hurricane. David was the strongest and deadliest tropical cyclone to make landfall in that country since 1930. In Dominican Republic alone, the system caused approximately 1,000 deaths and $1 billion in damage. Later, David brought wind damage, tornadoes, and flooding to portions of the East Coast of the United States. Overall, the storm resulted in 2,068 deaths and $1.54 billion in damage. Hurricane Frederic brought destruction to the Gulf Coast of the United States, especially in Alabama and Mississippi.

Tropical Storm Elena brought flooding to the Greater Houston area, with five deaths and about $10 million in damage. However, little impact was reported elsewhere. Hurricane Henri remained offshore in the Gulf of Mexico and disrupted efforts to stop the Ixtoc I oil spill. Henri also caused flooding in portions of Mexico. In mid and late-September, a tropical depression caused flooding in the Southern United States, especially Texas. Four deaths were reported, two in Texas and two in Kentucky. Toward the end of October, a brief subtropical storm struck Newfoundland, but left little impact. Other than Tropical Depression One and the tropical depression that brought flooding to the Southern United States in mid and late-September, none of the other depressions caused significant effects of land. Collectively, the tropical cyclones of the season resulted in $4.12 billion in damage and at least 2,136 deaths. Pacific Storm Blanca originated in the basin.

49th meridian west

The meridian 49° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Greenland, the Atlantic Ocean, South America, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 49th meridian west forms a great circle with the 131st meridian east.

50th meridian

50th meridian may refer to:

50th meridian east, a line of longitude east of the Greenwich Meridian

50th meridian west, a line of longitude west of the Greenwich Meridian

51st meridian west

The meridian 51° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Greenland, the Atlantic Ocean, South America, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 51st meridian west forms a great circle with the 129th meridian east.

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