480p

480p is the shorthand name for a family of video display resolutions. The p stands for progressive scan, i.e. non-interlaced. The 480 denotes a vertical resolution of 480 pixels, usually with a horizontal resolution of 640 pixels and 4:3 aspect ratio (480 × ​43 = 640) or a horizontal resolution of 854 or less (848 should be used for mod16 compatibility)[1] pixels for an approximate 16:9 aspect ratio (480 × ​169 = 853.3). Since a pixel count must be a whole number, in Wide VGA displays it is generally rounded up to 854 to ensure inclusion of the entire image. The frames are displayed progressively as opposed to interlaced. 480p was used for many early Plasma televisions.[2][3] Standard definition has always been a 4:3 aspect ratio with a pixel resolution of 640 × 480 pixels.

480p24 and 480p30

The ATSC digital television standards define 480p with 640×480p (4:3) pixel resolutions, at p24, p30, or p60 frames per second.

Both 480p24 and 480p30 are more common in countries that use or have used the interlaced NTSC system like North America and Japan (these formats are somewhat compatible with that system, when used to broadcast progressive film content).

Resolutions

Standard Resolution Aspect Ratio
480p 640×480p 4:3 (Most common 480p Aspect Ratio)
480p (1.85:1) 888×480p 1.85:1 (unscaled/Am. widescreen format)
480p (16:9) Approx. 854×480p or 848x480p 16:9
480p (3:2) 720×480p 3:2 (Same Aspect Ratio as iPod Touch 4 Screen)
480p (5:3) 800×480p 5:3

See also

References

  1. ^ "Best Practices For Multi-Device Transcoding | Knowledge Center". knowledge.kaltura.com. Retrieved 2016-09-12.
  2. ^ AfterDawn.com. "480p - AfterDawn: Glossary of technology terms & acronyms".
  3. ^ CNET - Glossary - 480p Archived 2009-07-09 at the Portuguese Web Archive
1080i

1080i (also known as Full HD or BT.709) is an abbreviation referring to a combination of frame resolution and scan type, used in high-definition television (HDTV) and high-definition video. The number "1080" refers to the number of horizontal lines on the screen. The "i" is an abbreviation for "interlaced"; this indicates that only the odd lines, then the even lines of each frame (each image called a video field) are drawn alternately, so that only half the number of actual image frames are used to produce video. A related display resolution is 1080p, which also has 1080 lines of resolution; the "p" refers to progressive scan, which indicates that the lines of resolution for each frame are "drawn" in on the screen sequence.

The term assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9 (a rectangular TV that is wider than it is tall), so the 1080 lines of vertical resolution implies 1920 columns of horizontal resolution, or 1920 pixels × 1080 lines. A 1920 pixels × 1080 lines screen has a total of 2.1 megapixels (2.1 million pixels) and a temporal resolution of 50 or 60 interlaced fields per second. This format is used in the SMPTE 292M standard.

The choice of 1080 lines originates with Charles Poynton, who in the early 1990s pushed for "square pixels" to be used in HD video formats.

1080° Avalanche

1080° Avalanche, released in Japan as 1080° Silverstorm (テン·エイティ シルバーストーム, Ten Eiti Shirubāsutōmu), is a snowboarding game for the Nintendo GameCube, developed by Nintendo's in-house development studio, Nintendo Software Technology, and published by Nintendo. Avalanche is a sequel to 1080° Snowboarding for the Nintendo 64.

The game has an emphasis on racing, rather than doing tricks, in contrast to other popular snowboarding games, such as the SSX series. It can output in 480p and Dolby Pro Logic II and supports four players on one GameCube as well as LAN play with up to four GameCubes.

480i

480i is a shorthand name for the video mode used for standard-definition analog or digital television in Caribbean, Myanmar, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Philippines, Laos, Western Sahara, and most of the Americas (with the exception of Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay). The 480 identifies a vertical resolution of 480 lines, and the i identifies it as an interlaced resolution. The field rate, which is 60 Hz (or 59.94 Hz when used with NTSC color), is sometimes included when identifying the video mode, i.e. 480i60; another notation, endorsed by both the International Telecommunication Union in BT.601 and SMPTE in SMPTE 259M, includes the frame rate, as in 480i/30. The other common standard, used in the other parts of the world, is 576i.

In analogue contexts, this resolution is often called "525 lines". It is mandated by CCIR Systems M and J, which are usually paired with NTSC color - which led to the "NTSC" name being often inaccurately used to refer to this video mode. Other color encodings have also been used with System M, notably PAL-M in Brazil.

576p

576p is the shorthand name for a video display resolution. The p stands for progressive scan, i.e. non-interlaced, the 576 for a vertical resolution of 576 pixels, usually with a horizontal resolution of 720 or 704 pixels. The frame rate can be given explicitly after the letter.

720p

720p (1280×720 px; also called HD Ready or standard HD) is a progressive HDTV signal format with 720 horizontal lines and an aspect ratio (AR) of 16:9, normally known as widescreen HDTV (1.78:1). All major HDTV broadcasting standards (such as SMPTE 292M) include a 720p format, which has a resolution of 1280×720; however, there are other formats, including HDV Playback and AVCHD for camcorders, that use 720p images with the standard HDTV resolution. The frame rate is standards-dependent, and for conventional broadcasting appears in 50 progressive frames per second in former PAL/SECAM countries (Europe, Australia, others), and 59.94 frames per second in former NTSC countries (North America, Japan, Brazil, others).

The number 720 stands for the 720 horizontal scan lines of image display resolution (also known as 720 pixels of vertical resolution). The p stands for progressive scan, i.e. non-interlaced. When broadcast at 60.00 frames/s frames per second, 720p features the highest temporal resolution possible under the ATSC and DVB standards. The term assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9, thus implying a resolution of 1280×720 px (0.9 megapixels).

720i (720 lines interlaced) is an erroneous term found in numerous sources and publications. Typically, it is a typographical error in which the author is referring to the 720p HDTV format. However, in some cases it is incorrectly presented as an actual alternative format to 720p. No proposed or existing broadcast standard permits 720 interlaced lines in a video frame at any frame rate.

CGMS-A

Copy Generation Management System – Analog (CGMS-A) is a copy protection mechanism for analog television signals. It consists of a waveform inserted into the non-picture Vertical Blanking Interval (VBI) of an analogue video signal. If a compatible recording device (for example, a DVD recorder) detects this waveform, it may block or restrict recording of the video content.

It is not the same as the broadcast flag, which is designed for use in digital television signals, although the concept is the same. There is a digital form of CGMS specified as CGMS-D which is required by the DTCP ("5C") protection standard.

Digital subchannel

In broadcasting, digital subchannels are a method of transmitting more than one independent program stream simultaneously from the same digital radio or television station on the same radio frequency channel. This is done by using data compression techniques to reduce the size of each individual program stream, and multiplexing to combine them into a single signal. The practice is sometimes called "multicasting".

Enhanced-definition television

Enhanced-definition television, or extended-definition television (EDTV) is an American Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) marketing shorthand term for certain digital television (DTV) formats and devices. Specifically, this term defines formats that deliver a picture superior to that of standard-definition television (SDTV) but not as detailed as high-definition television (HDTV).

The term refers to devices capable of displaying 480-line or 576-line signals in progressive scan, commonly referred to as 480p (NTSC-HQ) and 576p (PAL) respectively, as opposed to interlaced scanning, commonly referred to as 480i (NTSC) or 576i (PAL). High-motion is optional for EDTV.In other countries definitions may vary.

List of Windows 10 Mobile devices

This is a list of all devices coming natively with Microsoft's Windows 10 Mobile operating system. The list also includes devices running two additional flavours of Windows 10 for mobile devices, Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise and Windows 10 IoT Mobile Enterprise. All devices below come with SD card support.

Processors supported are Qualcomm's Snapdragon 210, 212, 410, 617, 800, 801, 808, 810 and 820 as well as Rockchip's RK3288.

List of Windows Phone 8.1 devices

This is a list of all devices running Microsoft's Windows Phone 8.1 operating system.

In addition to existing Windows Phone 8 partners HTC, Samsung and Huawei, Gionee, JSR, Karbonn, LG, Lenovo, Longcheer, XOLO, and ZTE signed on to create Windows Phone 8.1 devices in early 2014. Miia, Micromax, Prestigio, Yezz, BLU, K-Touch and InFocus were subsequently named as hardware partners later on in the year.Nokia's devices division was acquired by Microsoft in early 2014 and has since been rebranded as Microsoft Mobile. Microsoft Mobile continued to release Nokia-branded handsets running Windows Phone until a clearer strategy for aligning the Microsoft and Nokia brands was decided on in October 2014. This was to replace the Nokia name on future Lumia devices with Microsoft Lumia branding. The first device released without Nokia branding was the Lumia 535.

List of Windows Phone 8 devices

This is a list of hardware devices that are shipped with Microsoft's Windows Phone 8 operating system. HTC Corporation, Samsung, Nokia and Huawei have all launched Windows Phone 8 based devices. The list, sorted by processor and screen resolution, contains devices that have been confirmed and officially announced by their manufacturers.

PlayStation 3 accessories

Various accessories for the PlayStation 3 video game console have been produced by Sony. These include controllers, audio and video input devices like microphones, video cameras, and cables for better sound and picture quality.

Progressive scan

Progressive scanning (alternatively referred to as noninterlaced scanning) is a format of displaying, storing, or transmitting moving images in which all the lines of each frame are drawn in sequence. This is in contrast to interlaced video used in traditional analog television systems where only the odd lines, then the even lines of each frame (each image called a video field) are drawn alternately, so that only half the number of actual image frames are used to produce video. The system was originally known as "sequential scanning" when it was used in the Baird 240 line television transmissions from Alexandra Palace, United Kingdom in 1936. It was also used in Baird's experimental transmissions using 30 lines in the 1920s. Progressive scanning is universally used in computer screens in the 2000s.

Projector phone

A projector phone is a mobile phone that contains a built-in pico projector.

Roku

Roku players, branded simply as Roku ( ROH-koo), are a series of digital media players manufactured by Roku, Inc. Roku partners provide over-the-top content in the form of channels. The name comes from the Japanese word 六 (roku) meaning "six" and was named so because it was the sixth company that Anthony Wood (founder and CEO since 2002) started. A Roku streaming device receives data (the video stream) via a wired or Wi-Fi connection from an Internet router. The data is output via an audio cable, video cable, or an HDMI connector directly on some of the device models.

Programming and content for the devices are available from a wide variety of global providers.

SMPTE 344M

"SMPTE 344M" is a standard published by SMPTE which expands upon SMPTE 259M allowing for bit-rates of 540 Mbit/s, allowing EDTV resolutions of 480p and 576p.

This standard is part of a family of standards that define a Serial Digital Interface.

Tvigle

Tvigle is a website, video syndication network and over-the-top (OTT) delivery service offering ad-supported on-demand streaming of TV shows, webisodes and other videos from the likes of: BBC Worldwide, Fox, ABC, Nickelodeon, Channel One and other smaller networks. Tvigle videos are offered only to users in Russia and Ukraine, in Flash Video and HTML5 format, as well as 288p, 360p, 480p, and 720p HD. Via proprietary SaaS service VideoPublisher Tvigle also provides services for clients, among which are popular Russian media television channels, such as Forbes, Dailymotion, MTV Russia and Muz-TV.

Tvigle is a privately owned company, started by Egor Yakovlev in 2007 but is 25% owned by Allianz ROSNO since 2009, later followed by investment from Media3 in 2011.

Video scaler

A video scaler is a system which converts video signals from one display resolution to another; typically, scalers are used to convert a signal from a lower resolution (such as 480p standard definition) to a higher resolution (such as 1080i high definition), a process known as "upconversion" or "upscaling" (by contrast, converting from high to low resolution is known as "downconversion" or "downscaling").

Video scalers are typically found inside consumer electronics devices such as televisions, video game consoles, and DVD or Blu-ray disc players, but can also be found in other AV equipment (such as video editing and television broadcasting equipment). Video scalers can also be a completely separate devices, often providing simple video switching capabilities. These units are commonly found as part of home theatre or projected presentation systems. They are often combined with other video processing devices or algorithms to create a video processor that improves the apparent definition of video signals.

Video scalers are primarily a digital device; however, they can be combined with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC, or digitizer) and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) to support analog inputs and outputs.

W-VHS

W-VHS (Wide-VHS) is a HDTV analog recording videocassette format created by JVC. The format was originally introduced in 1994 for use with Japan's Hi-Vision, an early analog high-definition television system. In Japan, the letter "W" is often used as shorthand for the English word "double".

The recording medium of W-VHS is a ½-inch double-coated MP tape stored in a cartridge the same size as VHS. The tape can be used to store 1035i (HD) or 480i (SD) and a double channel of 480i (for storing 3D programs) (SD2) analog signals (but not 480p, 720p or 1080i). The video signal is recorded using a method called "time compression integration" which "records separated component video, luminance and color signals are offset by time in alternating parts of the video track". Because video signals are recorded in component form instead of the color under method used by S-VHS, standard definition image quality for W-VHS is typically much higher, due to the lack of noise caused by a chroma sub-carrier. Audio is stored in the VHS Hi-Fi or S-VHS Digital Audio formats.

W-VHS VCRs can record a standard or high definition video signal via an analog Y/Pb/Pr component interface. Very few devices with this capability exist, possibly due to content copyright restrictions. W-VHS has also been used for medical imaging, professional previewing, and broadcasting.

Currently, it is very difficult to find either W-VHS VCRs or tapes. Because of this scarcity, users have turned to the similar Digital-S (D-9) tape which uses the same kind of metal particle coating. While D-9 tapes are still not that easy to find, they are more available than W-VHS tapes in certain regions. JVC Professional even recommends the use of them for W-VHS. The running time between W-VHS and Digital-S is not the same; a Digital-S tape with a length of 64 min is approximately 105 min when used with W-VHS.

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