44th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 44th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, August 30, 1992. The ceremony was broadcast on Fox from the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California.[1] It was hosted by Tim Allen, Kirstie Alley and Dennis Miller, and directed by Walter C. Miller.[2] Presenters included Roseanne Barr, Tom Arnold, Scott Bakula, Candice Bergen, Corbin Bernsen, Beau Bridges, Lloyd Bridges, and Cindy Crawford.[2] The program was written by Buddy Sheffield and Bruce Vilanch.[3] Over 300 million people watched the ceremony in 30 countries. A rule change, instituted for this year only, stated that regular and guest performers would compete in the same category. There could be lead guest or supporting guest.

On the comedy side, Murphy Brown won Outstanding Comedy Series for the second time, winning three major awards on the night, the most for a comedy series. On the drama side, L.A. Law's strangle hold on Outstanding Drama Series came to an end, as Northern Exposure took home the award. Northern Exposure also won three major awards and received nine major nominations, which tied for the most in each category. For the first time in its run, The Golden Girls, then in its seventh and final season, was not nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series.

For the first time, the Lead Actor, Drama award went outside the Big Four television networks to a cable network show: Christopher Lloyd in Road to Avonlea, from the Disney Channel.

After being on the air for thirty years, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson finally heard its name called when its final season won for Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Program. The show was first nominated for the category in 1964 and was 0/13 before this ceremony.

As of the 2018 Emmy ceremony, this was the last year where the Big Four broadcast networks received all the nominations in both the Comedy and Drama Series categories.

44th Primetime Emmy Awards
DateAugust 30, 1992
LocationPasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Presented byAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted byTim Allen
Kirstie Alley
Dennis Miller
Television/radio coverage
NetworkFox

Winners and nominees

[4]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Program (Series) Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Program (Special)
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Michael Jeter as Herman Stiles on Evening Shade (Episodes: "Herman in Charge" + "Hasta la Vista"), (CBS)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
  • Richard Dysart as Leland McKenzie, Jr. on L.A. Law (Episodes: "Monkey on My Back Lot" + "P.S. Your Shrink Is Dead"), (NBC)
    • Edward Asner as Walter Kovacs on The Trials of Rosie O'Neill (Episodes: "Knock, Knock" + "Happy Birthday or Else"), (CBS)
    • John Corbett as Chris Stevens on Northern Exposure (Episodes: "Only You" + "Burning Down the House"), (CBS)
    • Richard Kiley as Doug in The Ray Bradbury Theater (Episode: "The Utterly Perfect Murder"), (USA)
    • Jimmy Smits as Victor Sifuentes on L.A. Law (Episodes: "Steal It Again, Sam" + "Say Goodnight, Gracie"), (NBC)
    • Dean Stockwell as Al Calavicci on Quantum Leap (Episodes: "The Leap Back: June 15, 1945" + "Dreams: February 28, 1979"), (NBC)
  • Valerie Mahaffey as Eve on Northern Exposure (Episodes: "The Bumpy Road to Love" + "Lost and Found" + "Our Wedding"), (CBS)
    • Mary Alice as Marguerite Peck on I'll Fly Away (Episodes: "Hard Lessons" + "A Dangerous Comfort"), (NBC)
    • Barbara Barrie as Mrs. Bream on Law & Order (Episode: "Vengeance"), (NBC)
    • Conchata Ferrell as Susan Bloom on L.A. Law (Episodes: "Spleen It to Me, Lucy" + "P.S. Your Shrink Is Dead"), (NBC)
    • Cynthia Geary as Shelly Tambo on Northern Exposure (Episodes: "Oy, Wilderness" + "Get Real"), (CBS)
    • Marg Helgenberger as KC Kolowski on China Beach (Episodes: "100 Klicks Out" + "The Always Goodbye"), (ABC)
    • Kay Lenz as Maggie Zombro on Reasonable Doubts (Episodes: "One Woman's Word" + "Maggie Finds Her Soul"), (NBC)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special
  • Amanda Plummer as Lusia Weiss on Miss Rose White, (NBC)
    • Anne Bancroft as Kate Jerome on Broadway Bound, (ABC)
    • Bibi Besch as Lisa Carter on Doing Time on Maple Drive, (Fox)
    • Penny Fuller as Kate Ryan on Miss Rose White, (NBC)
    • Maureen Stapleton as Tanta Perla on Miss Rose White, (NBC)

Directing

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing in a Drama Series
  • Eric Laneuville for I'll Fly Away (Episode: "All God's Children"), (NBC)
    • Jack Bender for Northern Exposure (Episode: "Seoul Mates"), (CBS)
    • Mimi Leder for China Beach (Episode: "Rewind"), (ABC)
    • Nancy Malone for The Trials of Rosie O'Neill (Episode: "Heartbreak Hotel"), (CBS)
    • Rick Wallace for L.A. Law (Episode: "Say Goodnight, Gracie"), (NBC)
Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing in a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Miniseries or a Special
  • Patricia Birch for Great Performances (Episode: "Unforgettable, with Love: Natalie Cole Sings the Songs of Nat King Cole"), (PBS)
    • Hal Gurnee for Late Night with David Letterman (Episode: "10th Anniversary Special"), (NBC)
    • Jeff Margolis for The 64th Annual Academy Awards, (ABC)
    • Walter C. Miller for The 45th Annual Tony Awards, (CBS)
    • Bobby Quinn for The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, (NBC)

Writing

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing in a Drama Series
Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing in a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing in a Miniseries or a Special
  • The 64th Annual Academy Awards, (ABC)
    • Saturday Night Live, (NBC)
    • Late Night with David Letterman, (NBC)
    • In Living Color, (Fox)
    • The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, (NBC)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
  • NBC – 57
  • CBS – 33
  • ABC – 25
By program
  • I'll Fly Away (NBC) / Northern Exposure (CBS) – 9
  • Seinfeld (NBC) – 8
  • Miss Rose White (NBC) / Murphy Brown (CBS) – 7
  • Cheers (NBC) – 6

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
  • NBC – 9
  • CBS – 8
  • ABC – 5
  • HBO – 2
By program
  • Miss Rose White (NBC) / Murphy Brown (CBS) / Northern Exposure (CBS) – 3
  • I'll Fly Away (NBC) – 2
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

References

  1. ^ Staff, "Roseanne Nominated But Her Show Isn't", Beacon Journal, July 17, 1992.
  2. ^ a b Overview for The 44th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards (1992), Turner Classic Movies, Retrieved 2008-09-03.
  3. ^ The 44th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards (1992), Hollywood.com, Retrieved 2008-09-03.
  4. ^ Emmys.com list of 1992 Nominees & Winners

External links

1992 Emmy Awards

1992 Emmy Awards may refer to:

44th Primetime Emmy Awards, the 1992 Emmy Awards ceremony honoring primetime programming

19th Daytime Emmy Awards, the 1992 Emmy Awards ceremony honoring daytime programming

20th International Emmy Awards, the 1992 Emmy Awards ceremony honoring international programming

44th Emmy Awards

44th Emmy Awards may refer to:

44th Primetime Emmy Awards, held in 1992

44th Daytime Emmy Awards, held in 2017

44th International Emmy Awards, held in 2016

45th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 45th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 19, 1993. The ceremony was broadcast on ABC and was hosted by Angela Lansbury. MTV received its first major nomination at this ceremony.

For its fourth season, Seinfeld won its first, and only, Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series. Cheers was once again nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series. It was nominated for all eleven years that it ran and won four times. This tied the record set by M*A*S*H which also went 11/11, but only won once.

On the drama side, Northern Exposure was the defending champion and was seen heavily as the favorite coming into the ceremony being the most nominated show with 11 major nominations—but in a major upset, Picket Fences took home Outstanding Drama Series. Northern Exposure set the dubious record for the largest shutout of all time, as it lost all 11 major nominations; including its Creative Arts Emmy Awards nominations, the record increases to 0/16. Both of these records were later broken by Mad Men (0/17) in 2012.

With David Clennon's win for Outstanding Comedy Guest Actor, this was the first time HBO won an Acting Emmy.

49th Golden Globe Awards

The 49th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television for 1991, were held on January 18, 1992 at the Beverly Hilton. The nominations were announced on December 27, 1991.

50th Golden Globe Awards

The 50th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television for 1992, were held on Saturday January 23, 1993 at the Beverly Hilton. The nominations were announced on December 29, 1992.

64th Academy Awards

The 64th Academy Awards ceremony, presented by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), honored the best films of 1991 in the United States and took place on March 30, 1992, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles beginning at 6:00 p.m. PST / 9:00 p.m. EST. During the ceremony, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented Academy Awards (commonly referred to as Oscars) in 23 categories. The ceremony, televised in the United States by ABC, was produced by Gil Cates and directed by Jeff Margolis. Actor Billy Crystal hosted the show for the third consecutive year. Three weeks earlier, in a ceremony held at the Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles on March 7, the Academy Awards for Technical Achievement were presented by host Tom Hanks.The Silence of the Lambs won five awards including Best Picture. Other winners included Terminator 2: Judgment Day with four awards, Beauty and the Beast, Bugsy, and JFK with two, and City Slickers, Deadly Deception: General Electric, Nuclear Weapons and Our Environment, The Fisher King, In the Shadow of the Stars, Manipulation, Mediterraneo, Session Man, and Thelma & Louise with one. The telecast garnered more than 44 million viewers in the United States.

A Thousand Heroes

A Thousand Heroes (also known as Crash Landing: The Rescue of Flight 232) is a 1992 American television film directed by Lamont Johnson and starring Charlton Heston, Richard Thomas, James Coburn, Bruce McGill, Tom Everett, and Leon Rossom. Its plot concerns the crash landing of Flight 232 at Sioux City, Iowa on July 19, 1989.

Bart Simpson

Bartholomew JoJo Simpson is a fictional character in the American animated television series The Simpsons and part of the Simpson family. He is voiced by Nancy Cartwright and first appeared on television in The Tracey Ullman Show short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987. Cartoonist Matt Groening created and designed Bart while waiting in the lobby of James L. Brooks' office. Groening had been called to pitch a series of shorts based on his comic strip, Life in Hell, but instead decided to create a new set of characters. While the rest of the characters were named after Groening's family members, Bart's name is an anagram of the word brat. After appearing on The Tracey Ullman Show for three years, the Simpson family received its own series on Fox, which debuted December 17, 1989.

At ten years old, Bart is the eldest child and only son of Homer and Marge, and the brother of Lisa and Maggie. Bart's most prominent and popular character traits are his mischievousness, rebelliousness and disrespect for authority. He has appeared in other media relating to The Simpsons – including video games, The Simpsons Movie, The Simpsons Ride, commercials, and comic books – and inspired an entire line of merchandise.

In casting, Nancy Cartwright originally planned to audition for the role of Lisa, while Yeardley Smith tried out for Bart. Smith's voice was too high for a boy, so she was given the role of Lisa. Cartwright found that Lisa was not interesting at the time, so instead auditioned for Bart, which she thought was a better role.Hallmarks of the character include his chalkboard gags in the opening sequence; his prank calls to Moe; and his catchphrases "Eat my shorts", "¡Ay, caramba!", "Don't have a cow, man!", and "I'm Bart Simpson. Who the hell are you?". Although, with the exception of "Ay, caramba!", they have been retired or not often used.

During the first two seasons of The Simpsons, Bart was the show's breakout character and "Bartmania" ensued, spawning Bart Simpson-themed merchandise touting his rebellious attitude and pride at underachieving, which caused many parents and educators to cast him as a bad role model for children. Around the third season, the series started to focus more on the family as a whole, though Bart still remains a prominent character. Time named Bart one of the 100 most important people of the 20th century, and he was named "entertainer of the year" in 1990 by Entertainment Weekly. Nancy Cartwright has won several awards for voicing Bart, including a Primetime Emmy Award in 1992 and an Annie Award in 1995. In 2000, Bart, along with the rest of his family, was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

He has appeared in every Simpsons episode except "Four Great Women and a Manicure".

Bibi Besch

Bibi Besch (born Bibiana Maria Köchert; February 1, 1942 – September 7, 1996) was an Austrian-American film, television, and stage actress. She is best known for playing Dr. Carol Marcus in the science fiction film Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (1982). Her other notable film roles were in Who's That Girl (1987), Steel Magnolias (1989), and Tremors (1990). Besch also appeared in a number of television series and received two Primetime Emmy Award nominations.

Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes?

"Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes?" is the twenty-fourth and final episode of The Simpsons' third season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on August 27, 1992. It was originally supposed to be the season premiere for the next season, but Fox decided to air it earlier, to promote the series première of Martin.

In the episode, Homer is awarded a US$2,000 compensation after the radiation from the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant causes him to become infertile. Meanwhile, Homer's half-brother, Herb, now living on the streets, comes to the Simpsons' house with a plan on how to regain his wealth. He reluctantly turns to Homer for help, and asks for the $2,000 so that he can develop a new product that will translate baby babbling into speech. The product becomes hugely successful and Herb regains his fortune.

The episode was written by John Swartzwelder and directed by Rich Moore. Danny DeVito guest starred in it as Herb, while Joe Frazier guest starred as himself. "Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes?" was the second time Herb appeared on the show; he had previously appeared in the season two episode "Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?", in which Homer causes him to become bankrupt. The producers decided to create this episode in part because many fans were unhappy about the sad ending to "Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?". "Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes?" received positive reviews from critics and DeVito was praised for his guest performance.

Dana Delany

Dana Welles Delany (born March 13, 1956) is an American actress, producer, and activist. After appearing in small roles early in her career, Delany received her breakthrough role as Colleen McMurphy on the ABC television drama China Beach (1988–1991), for which she twice received the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series in 1989 and 1992. She received further recognition for her appearances in the films Light Sleeper (1992), Tombstone (1993), Exit to Eden (1994), The Margaret Sanger Story (1995), Fly Away Home (1996), True Women (1997), and Wide Awake (1998).

In the 2000s, Delany appeared in main roles on several short-lived television series, including Pasadena (2001), Presidio Med (2002–2003), and Kidnapped (2006–2007). From 2007 to 2010, she starred as Katherine Mayfair on the ABC television series Desperate Housewives, for which she received a Prism Award in 2009. Delany then starred as Megan Hunt on the ABC medical drama Body of Proof (2011–2013), and as Crystal Harris on the Amazon drama series Hand of God (2014–2017).

Dennis Spiegel

Dennis Spiegel is an American lyricist. At the 44th Primetime Emmy Awards Spiegel won the award for Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics (shared with composer Curt Sobel) for the song "Why Do I Lie?" from the HBO movie Cast a Deadly Spell. He is a three time Emmy nominee. His film work includes the Michael Caine movie "Blame it on Rio" for which he wrote the lyrics for the song score.

John Corbett

John Joseph Corbett (born May 9, 1961) is an American actor and country music singer. He is known for his roles as Chris Stevens on CBS' Northern Exposure and as Aidan Shaw on HBO's Sex and the City. He reprised the latter role for the film sequel Sex and the City 2 (2010). Corbett also portrayed the male lead, Ian Miller, in the romantic comedy film My Big Fat Greek Wedding (2002) and its 2016 sequel.

Corbett starred as Max Gregson on Showtime's United States of Tara, recurred as Seth Holt on NBC's Parenthood, and starred as Josiah "Flash" Bacon on FX's Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll. Aside from acting, Corbett has released two country albums, including his Billboard-charting self-titled debut.

Joshua Brand

Joshua Brand is an American television writer, director, and producer who created St. Elsewhere, I'll Fly Away and Northern Exposure with his writing-and-producing partner John Falsey. He is currently a writer and consulting producer of FX's The Americans.

Julie Kavner

Julie Deborah Kavner (born September 7, 1950) is an American actress and voice actress. She first attracted notice for her role as Brenda Morgenstern, the younger sister of Valerie Harper's title character in the sitcom Rhoda, for which she won a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series. She is best known for her voice role as Marge Simpson on the animated television series The Simpsons. She also voices other characters for the show, including Marge's mother, Jacqueline Bouvier, and sisters Patty and Selma Bouvier.

Known for her improvisation and distinctive "honeyed gravel voice", Kavner was cast in her first professional acting role as Brenda Morgenstern in Rhoda in 1974. She received four Primetime Emmy Award nominations for playing the character, winning the award in 1978, the year that the series ended. Starting in 1987, Kavner started appearing on The Tracey Ullman Show. The Tracey Ullman Show included a series of animated shorts about a dysfunctional family. Voices were needed for the shorts, and the producers asked Kavner to voice Marge. The shorts were spun off into The Simpsons.

Kavner has been described as "nearly reclusive"; part of her contract says that she will never have to promote The Simpsons on video. For her work as Marge, Kavner received another Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance in 1992 and an Annie Award nomination for her performance as the character in The Simpsons Movie.

Typically cast as a "woman who is supportive, sympathetic or self-effacingly funny", Kavner grew to dislike playing such roles. In 1992, she starred in This Is My Life, her first leading role in a feature film. Kavner has also appeared in live-action roles in six films written by Woody Allen and in the Adam Sandler comedy Click.

Krusty Gets Kancelled

"Krusty Gets Kancelled" is the 22nd and final episode of The Simpsons' fourth season. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on May 13, 1993. In the episode, a new show featuring a puppet named Gabbo premieres in Springfield and competes with Krusty the Clown's show. Krusty's show is soon cancelled. Bart and Lisa decide to help Krusty get back on the air by staging a comeback special.

John Swartzwelder wrote the episode and David Silverman served as director. Following the success of "Homer at the Bat", the writers wanted to try a similar guest star-heavy episode, except with celebrities instead of baseball players. The episode proved quite difficult, as many of the actors asked to guest star declined at the last minute and the comeback special portion was nearly scrapped. Johnny Carson, Hugh Hefner, Bette Midler, Luke Perry, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers (Flea, Anthony Kiedis, Arik Marshall and Chad Smith) all guest star as themselves and appear on Krusty's special. Elizabeth Taylor and Barry White, both of whom guest-starred in previous episodes this season, make cameo appearances. The episode is known for being the only episode to date where Marge (despite her prominence) does not have a single line of dialogue.

List of awards and nominations received by Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure is an American television drama series created by Joshua Brand and John Falsey and produced by Cine-Nevada Productions and Universal Television. The show originally aired in the United States on CBS between July 12, 1990 and July 26, 1995, with 110 episodes split five seasons. The series, which starred Rob Morrow, Barry Corbin, Janine Turner, John Cullum, Darren E. Burrows, John Corbett, Cynthia Geary, Elaine Miles, Peg Phillips, Paul Provenza and Teri Polo, follows a New York City physician who sets up his practice in an eccentric small town.

Northern Exposure garnered critical praise and amassed 123 nominations for various industry awards. This includes 39 Emmy awards (with 7 wins), 10 Golden Globe awards (with 2 wins), 6 TCA awards (with one win), 19 Q awards (with two wins), 4 Directors Guild of America awards (one win) and 3 Writers Guild of America awards, as well as winning 2 consecutive Peabody Awards.

Several Northern Exposure cast members received awards and nominations for their individual work. Janine Turner, who portrayed lead character Maggie O'Donnell, received the most award nominations (12) while Valerie Mahaffey is the only actor on the series to win a Primetime Emmy Award.

Marge Simpson

Marjorie Jacqueline "Marge" Simpson (née Bouvier) is a fictional character in the American animated sitcom The Simpsons and part of the eponymous family. She is voiced by Julie Kavner and first appeared on television in The Tracey Ullman Show short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987. Marge was created and designed by cartoonist Matt Groening while he was waiting in the lobby of James L. Brooks' office. Groening had been called to pitch a series of shorts based on Life in Hell but instead decided to create a new set of characters. He named the character after his mother Margaret Groening. After appearing on The Tracey Ullman Show for three seasons, the Simpson family received their own series on Fox, which debuted December 17, 1989.

Marge is the matriarch of the Simpson family. With her husband Homer, she has three children: Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. Marge is the moralistic force in her family and often provides a grounding voice in the midst of her family's antics by trying to maintain order in the Simpson household. She is often portrayed as a stereotypical television mother and is often included on lists of top "TV moms". She has appeared in other media relating to The Simpsons—including video games, The Simpsons Movie, The Simpsons Ride, commercials, and comic books—and inspired an entire line of merchandise.

Marge's distinctive blue beehive hairstyle was inspired by a combination of the Bride's in Bride of Frankenstein and the style that Margaret Groening wore in the 1960s. Julie Kavner, who was a member of the original cast of The Tracey Ullman Show, was asked to voice Marge so that more voice actors would not be needed. Kavner has won several awards for voicing Marge, including a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance in 1992. She was also nominated for an Annie Award for Best Voice Acting in an Animated Feature for her performance in The Simpsons Movie. In 2000, Marge, along with the rest of her family, was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Michael Richards

Michael Anthony Richards (born July 24, 1949) is an American actor, writer, television producer and comedian, widely known for his portrayal of Cosmo Kramer on the television sitcom Seinfeld, for which he received the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series three times.

Richards began his career as a stand-up comedian, first entering the national spotlight when he was featured on Billy Crystal's first cable TV special. He went on to become a series regular on ABC's Fridays. Prior to Seinfeld, he made numerous guest appearances on a variety of television shows, such as Cheers. His film credits include So I Married an Axe Murderer, Airheads, Young Doctors in Love, Problem Child, Coneheads, UHF, and Trial and Error, one of his few starring roles. During the run of Seinfeld, he made a guest appearance in Mad About You. After Seinfeld, Richards starred in his own sitcom, The Michael Richards Show, which lasted less than one full season.

When Seinfeld ended in 1998, Richards returned to stand-up comedy. He incited media furor while performing at the Laugh Factory comedy club in late 2006 after a cell phone video was published of him launching into an expletive-laced racist tirade after earlier interruptions from a group of late-arriving audience members. Subsequently due to significant media coverage of the event he announced his retirement from stand-up early in 2007. He appeared as himself in the seventh season of Curb Your Enthusiasm in 2009, acting alongside his fellow cast members for the first time since Seinfeld's finale, as well as lampooning his incident at the Laugh Factory. In 2013, Richards returned to television when he played the role of Frank in the sitcom Kirstie.

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