43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment

The 43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment is an air defense artillery regiment of the United States Army first constituted 1918 in the Regular Army.

In 2018, its battalions use Patriot antimissiles, and are cross-training with THAAD.[1]

43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment
43 ADA COA
Coat of arms
Active1918
CountryUSA
BranchArmy
TypeAir defense artillery
Motto(s)SUSTINEMUS (We Support)
Branch colorScarlet
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia
43 ADA Rgt DUI

Lineage

Constituted 29 June 1918 in the Regular Army as the 43rd Artillery (Coast Artillery Corps)

Organized 7 August 1918 in France from existing Regular Army units and one New York National Guard company

(National Guard company demobilized in February 1919; regiment continued on active status)

Inactivated 17 August 1921 at Camp Eustis, Virginia

Redesignated 1 July 1924 as the 43rd Coast Artillery

Disbanded 14 June 1944

43rd Coast Artillery reconstituted 28 June 1950 in the Regular Army; regiment concurrently broken up and its elements redesignated as follows:

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 43rd Artillery Group

1st Battalion consolidated with the 43rd Field Artillery Battalion (see ANNEX 1) and consolidated unit designated as the 43rd Field Artillery Battalion, an element of the 8th Infantry Division

2d Battalion consolidated with the 61st Field Artillery Battalion (active) (see ANNEX 2) and consolidated unit designated as the 61st Field Artillery Battalion, an element of the 1st Cavalry Division

3d Battalion consolidated with the 64th Field Artillery Battalion (active) (see ANNEX 3) and consolidated unit designated as the 64th Field Artillery Battalion, an element of the 25th Infantry Division

After 28 June 1950 the above units underwent changes as follows:

43rd Field Artillery Battalion activated 17 August 1950 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina

Inactivated 1 August 1957 in Germany and relieved from assignment to the 8th Infantry Division

61st Field Artillery Battalion inactivated 15 October 1957 in Japan and relieved from assignment to the 1st Cavalry Division

64th Field Artillery Battalion inactivated 1 February 1957 in Hawaii and relieved from assignment to the 25th Infantry Division

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 43d Artillery Group, and the 43rd, 61st, and 64th Field Artillery Battalions consolidated, reorganized, and redesignated August 1958 – July 1959 as the 43rd Artillery, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System

Redesignated 1 September 1971 as the 43rd Air Defense Artillery

Withdrawn 16 March 1989 from the Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System

Redesignated 1 October 2005 as the 43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment

ANNEX 1

Constituted 1 October 1933 in the Regular Army as the 43rd Field Artillery

Redesignated 13 January 1941 as the 43rd Field Artillery Battalion

Assigned 1 June 1941 to the 8th Division (later redesignated as the 8th Infantry Division) and activated at Fort Jackson, South Carolina

Inactivated 20 October 1945 at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

ANNEX 2

Constituted 16 December 1940 in the Regular Army as the 61st Field Artillery Battalion

Assigned 3 January 1941 to the 1st Cavalry Division and activated at Fort Bliss, Texas

ANNEX 3

Constituted 26 August 1941 in the Regular Army as the 64th Field Artillery Battalion and assigned to the 25th Infantry Division

Activated 1 October 1941 in Hawaii

Distinctive unit insignia

  • Description

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 5/32 inches (2.94 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, on a bend Or three oozlefinches Vert. Attached above a wreath Or and Gules, an épi Or around and behind a French locomotive affronté Gules. Attached below the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “SUSTINEMUS” in Black letters.

  • Symbolism

The shield is red for Artillery. The bend is taken from the arms of Lorraine, which is gold with three golden alerions on a red bend, with the colors reversed. The three oozlefinches are used instead of the alerions. The green oozlefinch was the device on the shoulder patch worn by the railway artillery reserve in France, of which this Regiment was a unit. The locomotive and épi show the character of the Regiment. The motto translates to “We Support” and alludes to the mission of railway artillery.

  • Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 43d Coast Artillery Regiment on 1 February 1937. It was redesignated for the 43d Artillery Regiment on 13 January 1959. The insignia was redesignated for the 43d Air Defense Artillery Regiment effective 1 September 1971. It was amended to correct the symbolism on 17 November 1983.

Coat of arms

Blazon

  • Shield

Gules, on a bend Or three oozlefinches Vert.

  • Crest

On a wreath of the colors, Or and Gules, an épi Or around and behind a French locomotive affronté Gules. Motto SUSTINEMUS (We Support).

Symbolism

  • Shield

The shield is red for Artillery. The bend is taken from the arms of Lorraine, which is gold with three golden alerions on a red bend, with the colors reversed. The three oozlefinches are used instead of the alerions. The green oozlefinch was the device on the shoulder patch worn by the railway artillery reserve in France, of which this Regiment was a unit.

  • Crest

The locomotive and épi show the character of the Regiment.

Background

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 43d Coast Artillery Regiment on 2 March 1929. It was redesignated for the 43d Artillery Regiment on 13 January 1959. The insignia was redesignated for the 43d Air Defense Artillery Regiment effective 1 September 1971. It was amended to correct the blazon and symbolism on 17 November 1983.

Current configuration

  • 1st Battalion 43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment (United States)[1]
  • 2nd Battalion 43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment (United States)[2]
  • 3rd Battalion 43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment (United States)[3]

Campaign participation credit

  • World War I: St. Mihiel; Meuse-Argonne; Lorraine 1918
  • World War II: Normandy; Northern France; Rhineland; Central Europe; Central Pacific; Guadalcanal; Northern Solomons; New Guinea; Bismarck Archipelago; Leyte (with arrowhead); Luzon
  • Korean War: UN Defensive; UN Offensive; CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter; Korea, Summer 1953
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait; Cease-Fire
  • War on Terrorism: Global War on Terrorism (additional campaigns to be determined)

Decorations

  • Presidential Unit Citation (Army), Streamer embroidered GUADALCANAL
  • Presidential Unit Citation (Army), Streamer embroidered NAM RIVER
  • Presidential Unit Citation (Army), Streamer embroidered PAKCHON, KOREA
  • Presidential Unit Citation (Navy), Streamer embroidered WONJU-HWACHON
  • Presidential Unit Citation (Navy), Streamer embroidered IRAQ 2003
  • Valorous Unit Award, Streamer embroidered SAUDI ARABIA AND BAHRAIN 1991
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered SOUTHWEST ASIA 2002–2003
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered SOUTHWEST ASIA 2013-2014
  • Army Superior Unit Award, Streamer embroidered 1992–1993
  • Army Superior Unit Award, Streamer embroidered 1998–1999
  • Navy Unit Commendation, Streamer embroidered PANMUNJOM
  • Air Force Outstanding Unit Award, Streamer embroidered ALASKA

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Institute of Heraldry document "43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment".

  1. ^ THAAD training maintains readiness: 32nd AAMDC fires off interceptors in a simulated tactical environment

External links

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11th Air Defense Artillery Brigade (United States)

The 11th Air Defense Artillery Brigade is an air defense artillery brigade of the United States Army stationed at Fort Bliss.

35th Air Defense Artillery Brigade (United States)

The 35th Air Defense Artillery Brigade (35th ADAB) is an air defense artillery unit of the United States Army subordinate to the Eighth United States Army, located at Osan Air Base in the Republic of Korea.

The 35th ADA has integrated THAAD into its layered defense on the Korean Peninsula.

43rd Regiment

43rd Regiment or 43rd Infantry Regiment may refer to:

43rd Erinpura Regiment, a unit of the British Indian Army

43rd Infantry Regiment (France), a unit of the French Army

43rd Infantry Regiment (Philippine Commonwealth Army), a unit of the Philippine Commonwealth Army

43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot, a unit of the United Kingdom Army

43rd Royal Tank Regiment, a armoured unit of the United Kingdom Army

43rd Infantry Regiment (United States), a unit of the United States Army

43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment, a unit of the United States Army

43rd Bomber Aviation Regiment, a aviation unit of the Yugoslav Air ForceAmerican Civil War regiments

43rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment, a unit of the Union (North) Army

43rd Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, a unit of the Union (North) Army

43rd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, a unit of the Union (North) Army

43rd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, a unit of the Union (North) Army

43rd Indiana Infantry Regiment, a unit of the Union (North) Army

43rd Ohio Infantry, a unit of the Union (North) Army

43rd United States Colored Infantry, a unit of the Union (North) Army

43rd Georgia Volunteer Infantry, a unit of the Confederate Army

43rd North Carolina Infantry, a unit of the Confederate Army

43rd Mississippi Infantry, a unit of the Confederate Army

Air Defense Artillery Branch

The Air Defense Artillery branch is the branch of the United States Army that specializes in anti-aircraft weapons (such as surface to air missiles). In the U.S. Army, these groups are composed of mainly air defense systems such as the Patriot Missile System, Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD), and the Avenger Air Defense system which fires the FIM-92 Stinger missile. The Air Defense Artillery branch descended from Anti-Aircraft Artillery (part of the U.S. Army Coast Artillery Corps until 1950, then part of the Artillery Branch) into a separate branch on 20 June 1968. On 1 December 1968, the ADA branch was authorized to wear modified Artillery insignia, crossed field guns with missile. The Branch Motto, "First To Fire", was adopted in 1986 by the attendees of the ADA Commanders' Conference at Fort Bliss. The motto refers to a speech given by General Jonathan Wainwright to veterans of the 200th Coast Artillery (Antiaircraft) stating they were the 'First to Fire' in World War II against the Empire of Japan.

MIM-104 Patriot

The MIM-104 Patriot is a surface-to-air missile (SAM) system, the primary of its kind used by the United States Army and several allied nations. It is manufactured by the U.S. defense contractor Raytheon and derives its name from the radar component of the weapon system. The AN/MPQ-53 at the heart of the system is known as the "Phased Array Tracking Radar to Intercept on Target" which is a backronym for PATRIOT. The Patriot System replaced the Nike Hercules system as the U.S. Army's primary High to Medium Air Defense (HIMAD) system, and replaced the MIM-23 Hawk system as the U.S. Army's medium tactical air defense system. In addition to these roles, Patriot has been given the function of the U.S. Army's anti-ballistic missile (ABM) system, which is now Patriot's primary mission. The system is expected to stay fielded until at least 2040.Patriot uses an advanced aerial interceptor missile and high-performance radar systems. Patriot was developed at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, which had previously developed the Safeguard ABM system and its component Spartan and hypersonic speed Sprint missiles. The symbol for Patriot is a drawing of a Revolutionary War-era Minuteman.

Patriot systems have been sold to the Netherlands, Poland, Germany, Japan, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Republic of China (Taiwan), Greece, Spain, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Romania. South Korea purchased several second-hand Patriot systems from Germany after North Korea test-launched ballistic missiles to the Sea of Japan and proceeded with underground nuclear testing in 2006. Jordan also purchased several second-hand Patriot systems from Germany.

Poland hosts training rotations of a battery of U.S. Patriot launchers. This started in the town of Morąg in May 2010 but was later moved further from the Russian border to Toruń and Ustka due to Russian objections.

On December 4, 2012, NATO authorized the deployment of Patriot missile launchers in Turkey to protect the country from missiles fired in the civil war in neighboring Syria. Patriot was one of the first tactical systems in the U.S. Department of Defense’s (DoD) to employ lethal autonomy in combat.The Patriot system gained notoriety during the Persian Gulf War of 1991 with the claimed engagement of over 40 Iraqi Scud missiles, those claims became a source of controversy. The system was highly successfully used against Iraqi missiles in 2003 Iraq War, and has been also used by Saudi and Emirati forces in the Yemen conflict against Houthi missile attacks. The Patriot system achieved its first undisputed shootdowns of enemy aircraft in the service of the Israeli Air Defense Command. Israeli MIM-104D batteries shot down two Hamas UAVs during Operation Protective Edge in 2014 and later, on September 23, 2014, an Israeli Patriot battery shot down a Syrian Air Force Sukhoi Su-24 which had penetrated Israeli airspace, achieving the first shootdown of a manned enemy aircraft in the world for the system.

Site Summit

The Nike Site Summit (or just Site Summit) is a historic military installation of the United States Army in Anchorage Borough, Alaska. The site, located in the Chugach Mountains overlooking Joint Base Elmendorf–Richardson, is the location of one of the best-preserved surviving Nike-Hercules missile installations in the state. The site's structures include a battery control area, a missile launch area, and several magazines. Units of the 43rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment, USARAL Artillery Group, United States Army Alaska, would have garrisoned the site. The site was built in 1957-58 and equipped with missiles in 1959. The site was in active service defending the United States from the threat of Soviet air strikes until it was decommissioned in 1979, after which sensitive militarily equipment (including missiles, radar equipment, and launch control equipment) was removed. The U.S. Army maintained the site into the 1980s before abandoning it. The site was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. A local non-profit group, Friends of Nike Site Summit, is actively attempting to preserve the site.Site Summit was one of 145 Nike-Hercules sites that were built as a part of the defense network that protected the United States during the Cold War. In 1959-60, eight Nike missile sites were constructed in Alaska. The Nike sites in Alaska, including Site Summit, served a vital defense role due to their location—being between the Soviet Union and continental United States. Site Summit performed live fire tests of its Nike-Hercules missiles between 1960 and 1963, before the launches became dangerous due to the growing population of Anchorage.

The Nike-Hercules missile, the United States military's first anti-aircraft missile capable of being equipped with nuclear warheads, was a formidable defense weapon. The United States’ Nike-Hercules sites were created in response to the rising possibility of nuclear attack by Soviet bombers. Operation of Nike-Hercules sites such as Site Summit required 125 personnel. Despite the ability of Nike missiles, the advent of intercontinental missiles quickly made the Nike-Hercules missiles obsolete. Nike-Hercules sites began closing in 1965 and all Nike-Hercules sites had been decommissioned by 1975 except ones in Alaska and Florida—Site Summit in Anchorage and the Nike-Hercules site in Key West were the last two sites to close in 1979.Friends of Nike Site Summit partnered with multiple state agencies in 2009 in order to restore the site. After three years of restoration, guided tours began in the summer of 2012.

U.S. Army Regimental System

The United States Army Regimental System (USARS) was established in 1981 to replace the Combat Arms Regimental System, to provide each soldier with continuous identification with a single regiment, and to increase a soldier's probability of serving recurring assignments with his or her regiment. The USARS was intended to enhance combat effectiveness by providing the opportunity for a regimental affiliation, thus obtaining some of the benefits of the traditional regimental system.

United States Army Alaska

United States Army Alaska (USARAK or "America's Arctic Warriors") is a military command of the United States Army located in the U.S. state of Alaska. A subordinate command of the United States Army Pacific, USARAK is the ground element of the Alaskan Command. USARAK is headquartered at Fort Richardson and commanded by a major general.

Artillery formations of the United States
Misc. formations
Air Defense Artillery
Coast Artillery
Field Artillery

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