43rd Academy Awards

The 43rd Academy Awards ceremony, presented by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, was held on April 15, 1971, and took place at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to honor the best films of 1970. The Awards presentation, hosting duties were handled by 34 "Friends of Oscar" and broadcast by NBC for the first time in 11 years.

It was during this ceremony that George C. Scott became the first actor to reject an Oscar, claiming that the Academy Awards were "a two-hour meat parade, a public display with contrived suspense for economic reasons."[1]

With her Best Supporting Actress win, Helen Hayes became the first performer to win Oscars in both lead and supporting categories (having won Best Actress 38 years before for The Sin of Madelon Claudet). She also has the record of having the biggest gap between acting wins.

The documentary film Woodstock garnered three Oscar nominations, making it the most nominated documentary film in Oscar history.

This was the only time since the 2nd Academy Awards that all five nominees for Best Actress were first-time nominees, as well as the last time that either lead acting category had all new nominees. Also, this was the first time since the 7th Academy Awards in which none of the nominees for the Academy Award for Best Actor had a previous nomination in that category.

43rd Academy Awards
43rd Academy Awards
DateApril 15, 1971
SiteDorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles, California
Produced byRobert Wise
Directed byRichard Dunlap
Highlights
Best PicturePatton
Most awardsPatton (7)
Most nominationsAirport and Patton (10)
TV in the United States
NetworkNBC

Winners and nominees

Franklin J. Schaffner
Franklin J. Schaffner, Best Director winner
George C. Scott - publicity
George C. Scott, Best Actor winner
Glenda Jackson
Glenda Jackson, Best Actress winner
John Mills by Gabi Rona
John Mills, Best Supporting Actor winner
Promotional photograph of Helen Hayes
Helen Hayes, Best Supporting Actress winner
Francis Ford Coppola -1976
Francis Ford Coppola, Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium co-winner
Beatles ad 1965 just the beatles crop
The Beatles, Best Original Song Score winners

Winners are listed first, highlighted in boldface and indicated with a double dagger (double-dagger).[2][3]

Best Picture Best Director
Best Actor Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor Best Supporting Actress
Best Story and Screenplay Based on Factual Material or Material Not Previously Published or Produced Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium
Best Documentary Feature Best Documentary Short Subject
Best Live Action Short Subject Best Short Subject – Cartoons
Best Original Score Best Original Song Score
Best Song Original for the Picture Best Sound
Best Foreign Language Film Best Costume Design
Best Art Direction Best Cinematography
Best Film Editing Best Special Visual Effects

Films with multiple wins and nominations

Films that received multiple nominations
Nominations Film
10 Airport
Patton
7 Love Story
5 M*A*S*H
Tora! Tora! Tora!
4 Five Easy Pieces
Ryan's Daughter
Scrooge
Women in Love
3 Darling Lili
I Never Sang for My Father
Lovers and Other Strangers
Woodstock
2 Cromwell
The Great White Hope
Films that received multiple awards
Wins Film
7 Patton
2 Ryan's Daughter

Presenters and performers

The following individuals presented awards or performed musical numbers.

Presenters

Name(s) Role
Shirley Jones
John Marley
Presenters of the award for Best Sound
Maggie Smith Presenter of the award for Best Supporting Actor
John Huston Presenter of the Academy Honorary Award to Orson Welles
Gregory Peck Presenter of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award to Frank Sinatra
Melvyn Douglas Presenter of the Academy Honorary Award to Lillian Gish
Gig Young Presenter of the award for Best Supporting Actress
Richard Benjamin
Paula Prentiss
Presenters of the award for Best Documentary Short Subject and Best Documentary Feature
Jim Brown
Sally Kellerman
Presenters of the award for Best Short Subject – Cartoons and Best Live Action Short Subject
Merle Oberon Presenter of the award for Best Costume Design
Lola Falana
Juliet Prowse
Presenters of the award for Best Special Visual Effects
Geneviève Bujold
James Earl Jones
Presenters of the award for Best Cinematography and Best Film Editing
Petula Clark Presenter of the award for Best Art Direction
Ricardo Montalbán
Jeanne Moreau
Presenters of the award for Best Foreign Language Film
Joan Blondell
Glen Campbell
Presenters of the award for Best Original Score and Best Original Song Score
Burt Lancaster Presenter of the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award to Ingmar Bergman
Burt Bacharach
Angie Dickinson
Presenters of the award for Best Original Song
Janet Gaynor
Ryan O'Neal
Presenters of the award for Best Director
Harry Belafonte
Eva Marie Saint
Presenters of the award for Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium
Sarah Miles
George Segal
Presenters of the award for Best Screenplay Based on Factual Material or Material Not Previously Produced or Published
Goldie Hawn Presenter of the award for Best Actor
Walter Matthau Presenter of the award for Best Actress
Steve McQueen Presenter of the award for Best Picture

Performers

Name(s) Role Performed
Glen Campbell Performer "Pieces of Dreams" from Pieces of Dreams
Petula Clark Performer "For All We Know" from Lovers and Other Strangers
Petula Clark
Sally Kellerman
Burt Lancaster
Ricardo Montalbán
Performers "Thank You Very Much" from Scrooge
Lola Falana Performer "Till Love Touches Your Life" from Madron
Shirley Jones Performer "Whistling Away the Dark" from Darling Lili

See also

References

  1. ^ TotalFilm. "Review of Patton". Archived from the original on July 5, 2011. Retrieved 2006-04-24.
  2. ^ "The Official Acadademy Awards® Database". Archived from the original on 2014-06-09. Retrieved 2011-11-09.
  3. ^ "The 43rd Academy Awards (1971) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on July 2, 2015. Retrieved July 4, 2015.
1971 in animation

The year 1971 in animation involved some events.

7th Academy Awards

The 7th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1934, was held on February 27, 1935, at the Biltmore Hotel in Los Angeles, California. They were hosted by Irvin S. Cobb.

Frank Capra's influential romantic comedy It Happened One Night became the first film to perform a "clean sweep" of the top five award categories: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Screenplay. This feat would later be duplicated by One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in 1976 and The Silence of the Lambs in 1992. It also was the first romantic comedy to be named Best Picture, and the first to win two acting Oscars.

For the first time, the Academy standardized the practice – still in effect – that the award eligibility period for a film would be the preceding calendar year.

This was also the first of only two years in which write-in candidates were allowed by the Academy as a tacit response to the controversy surrounding the snub of Bette Davis' performance in Of Human Bondage.

The categories of Best Film Editing, Best Original Score, and Best Original Song were first introduced this year.

This was the last time that those in the Best Actor category were all first time nominees, as well as the last time until the 43rd Academy Awards where either leading acting category had all first time nominees (All nominees in the Best Actress category that year were all first timers, the only other time this had occurred since the 2nd Academy Awards).

Shirley Temple received the first Juvenile Award at age six, making her the youngest Oscar recipient ever.

A. D. Flowers

A. D. Flowers (February 22, 1917 – July 5, 2001) was an American special effects artist who was perhaps best known for his work on Tora! Tora! Tora!. For which he won an Academy Award. He also "created memorable scenes" for the films "The Godfather" and "Apocalypse Now".He was born in Texas, but raised in Oklahoma. After high school, he went to California. There he obtained a job at MGM Studios as a "studio handyman". He served in the US Navy in World War II on USS Saranac in the Pacific War. After being discharged from the service he stayed in California and went back to work with a Hollywood studio. He died at age 84 of complications of emphysema and pneumonia.

Bill Thomas (costume designer)

Bill Thomas (October 13, 1921 – May 30, 2000) was an American Academy Award-winning costume designer who had over 180 credits. He is perhaps best known for films like Babes in Toyland, Spartacus and The Happiest Millionaire. He was nominated 10 times.

In 2006 the Costume Designers Guild Awards put him in the Hall of Fame.

Frank Sinatra filmography

Frank Sinatra (1915–1998) was an American singer, actor, and producer who was one of the most popular and influential musical artists of the 20th century. Over the course of his acting career he created a body of work that one biographer described as being "as varied, impressive and rewarding as that of any other Hollywood star".Sinatra began his career as a singer, initially in his native Hoboken, New Jersey, but increasing success led to a contract to perform on stage and radio across the United States. One of his earliest film roles was in the 1935 short film Major Bowes' Amateur Theatre of the Air, a spin off from the Major Bowes Amateur Hour radio show. He appeared in a full-length film in an uncredited cameo singing performance in Las Vegas Nights, singing "I'll Never Smile Again" with Tommy Dorsey's The Pied Pipers. His work with Dorsey's band also led to appearances in the full-length films Las Vegas Nights (1941) and Ship Ahoy (1942). As Sinatra's singing career grew, he appeared in larger roles in feature films, several of which were musicals, including three alongside Gene Kelly: Anchors Aweigh (1945), On the Town (1949) and Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949). As his acting career developed further, Sinatra also produced several of the film's in which he appeared, and directed one—None but the Brave—which he also produced and in which he starred.Sinatra's film and singing careers had declined by 1952, when he was out-of-contract with both his record company and film studio. In 1953 he re-kindled his film career by targeting serious roles: he auditioned for—and won—a role in From Here to Eternity for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor and the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture. Other serious roles followed, including a portrayal of an ex-convict and drug addict in The Man with the Golden Arm, for which he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor and the British Academy Film Award for the Best Actor in a Leading Role.Sinatra received numerous awards for his film work. He won the Golden Globe for Best Actor – Motion Picture Musical or Comedy for Pal Joey (1957), and was nominated in the same category for Come Blow Your Horn (1963). Three of the films in which Sinatra appears, The House I Live In (1945), The Manchurian Candidate (1962) and From Here to Eternity (1953)—have been added to the Library of Congress's National Film Registry. The House I Live In—a film that opposes anti-Semitism and racism—was awarded a special Golden Globe and Academy Award. In 1970, at the 43rd Academy Awards, Sinatra was presented with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award; the following year he was awarded the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award.

Hoa-Binh (film)

Hoa-Binh is a 1970 French film directed by Raoul Coutard and based on a novel by Francoise Lorrain. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. It was also entered into the 1970 Cannes Film Festival, where Coutard won the prize for Best First Work.

Interviews with My Lai Veterans

Interviews with My Lai Veterans is a 1970 American short documentary film directed by Joseph Strick featuring firsthand accounts of the My Lai Massacre. It won an Oscar at the 43rd Academy Awards in 1971 for Best Documentary (Short Subject). The Academy Film Archive preserved Interviews with My Lai Veterans in 2002.

Jack Bear

Jack Bear (October 19, 1920 – November 10, 2007) was an American costume designer. He was nominated at the 43rd Academy Awards for Best Costumes for the film Darling Lili. The nomination was shared with Donald Brooks.He was also known for doing costumes on TV shows such as Dallas.

He won an Emmy Award for the costumes on The Julie Andrews Hour.

James E. Newcom

James E. Newcom (August 29, 1905 – October 6, 1990) was an American film editor who had over 40 films during his long career.

List of Belgian submissions for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film

Belgium has submitted films for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film since 1967. The award is handed out annually by the United States Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences to a feature-length motion picture produced outside the United States that contains primarily non-English dialogue. The "Best Foreign Language Film" category was not created until the 1956 Academy Awards, in which a competitive Academy Award of Merit, known as the Best Foreign Language Film Award, was created for non-English speaking films, and has been given annually since. Between 1947 and 1955, the Academy presented a non-competitive Honorary Award for the best foreign language films released in the United States.As of 2018, seven Belgian films have been nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. Of these films, two have been directed by Gérard Corbiau: The Music Teacher and Farinelli. The five other Belgian directors to have films accepted as nominees are Jacques Boigelot, Stijn Coninx, Dominique Deruddere, Michaël R. Roskam and Felix Van Groeningen. Boigelot's Peace in the Fields was accepted as a nominee at the 43rd Academy Awards, Stijn Coninx's Daens was a nominee in 1993, Deruddere's Everybody's Famous! was a nominee at the 73rd Academy Awards, Roskam's Bullhead for the 84th and Van Groeningen's The Broken Circle Breakdown for the 86th.

List of submissions to the 43rd Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film

The following 13 films, all from different countries, were submitted for the 43rd Academy Awards in the category Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The titles highlighted in blue and yellow were the five nominated films, which came from Belgium, France, Italy, Spain and Switzerland. Italy ended up winning the award for crime drama Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion.

Lovefilm (film)

Lovefilm (Hungarian: Szerelmesfilm) is a 1970 Hungarian drama film written and directed by István Szabó. The film was selected as the Hungarian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 43rd Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.Lovefilm is a film that is a cinematic imagery of the unspoken and untold aspects of love and hope between individuals. It depicts love between two childhood sweet hearts who continue to share strong bond and friendship through their adulthood though they quite do not define it as a love relationship for most part. They continue to refer to their relation as friends or childhood friendship or even introduce each other to their friends as 'like my brother' and 'like my sister'. It thus depicts love and undefined relationships that is experienced by most humans in their lives. Hence the musical and lucid title of 'Serelmesfilm' or 'Lovefilm'.

Mortal Sin (film)

Mortal Sin (Portuguese: Pecado Mortal) is a 1970 Brazilian drama film directed by Miguel Faria Jr. The film was selected as the Brazilian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 43rd Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

O.k. (film)

o.k. is a 1970 West German anti-war film directed by Michael Verhoeven. It was chosen as West Germany's official submission to the 43rd Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film, but did not manage to receive a nomination. The film was also entered into the 20th Berlin International Film Festival. However, the competition was cancelled and no prizes were awarded, over controversy surrounding the film.

Salt of the Black Earth

Salt of the Black Earth (Polish: Sól ziemi czarnej) is a Polish historical film that takes place during the Second Silesian Uprising. It was directed by Kazimierz Kutz and released in 1970. The film was selected as the Polish entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 43rd Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Stuart Gilmore

Stuart Gilmore (March 8, 1909 – November 19, 1971) was an American film editor who had over 45 editing credits along with 10 directing credits. He was nominated for three Academy Awards with the last nomination being posthumous.

The Night of Counting the Years

The Night of Counting the Years, also released in Arabic as The Mummy (Arabic: Al-Mummia المومياء) is a 1969 Egyptian film and the only feature film directed by Shadi Abdel Salam. The film was selected as the Egyptian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 43rd Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

The Scandalous Adventures of Buraikan

The Scandalous Adventures of Buraikan (無頼漢, Buraikan) is a 1970 Japanese film directed by Masahiro Shinoda. It was Japan's submission to the 43rd Academy Awards for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Awards of Merit
Special awards
Former awards
Ceremonies

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