41st Academy Awards

The 41st Academy Awards were presented on April 14, 1969, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles. It was the first Academy Awards ceremony to be staged at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. For the first time since the 11th Academy Awards, there was no host.

Oliver! became the first—and so far, the only—G-rated film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. By contrast, the following year would see the only X-rated film to win Best Picture, Midnight Cowboy. Oliver! would also be the last British film to win Best Picture until Chariots of Fire in 1982 and the last movie musical to win until Chicago in 2003 (though others have been nominated between 1969 and 2003: Hello, Dolly!, Fiddler on the Roof, Cabaret, All That Jazz, Beauty and the Beast, and Moulin Rouge!).

The year was notable for the first—and so far, only—tie for Best Actress (or any female acting category). Katharine Hepburn in The Lion in Winter and Barbra Streisand in Funny Girl shared the award. Hepburn also became the second actress and third performer overall to win an acting Oscar two years in a row, after Luise Rainer in 1936 (The Great Ziegfeld) and 1937 (The Good Earth), and Spencer Tracy in 1937 (Captains Courageous) and 1938 (Boys Town). The previous year, Hepburn had won Best Actress for Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.

As the special effects director and designer for 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick was the recipient of the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects this year. It was the only Oscar he would ever win.[1]

Cliff Robertson's performance in Charly was met with a generally mixed reception from critics and audiences. When he won the Academy Award for Best Actor, it engendered some controversy: less than two weeks after the ceremony, TIME mentioned the Academy's generalized concerns over "excessive and vulgar solicitation of votes" and said "many members agreed that Robertson's award was based more on promotion than on performance."[2]

At the ceremony, Young Americans was announced as the Documentary Feature winner. On May 7, 1969, the film was disqualified because it had played in October 1967, thus making it ineligible for a 1968 award. Journey into Self, the first runner-up, was awarded the Oscar on May 8, 1969.

Controversy was created on Oscar night when Johnny Carson and Buddy Hackett announced in a sketch on the evening's Tonight Show, which was recorded three hours before the awards ceremony, that Oliver! would be the winner for Best Picture and that Jack Albertson would win for Best Supporting Actor. Columnist Frances Drake claimed that most observers believed Carson and Hackett "were playing a huge practical joke or happened to make a lucky guess."[3] As Carson recalled it on the air years later, it created a huge controversy and people at Price Waterhouse were fired. Referring to it as "The Great Carson Hoax," PricewaterhouseCoopers stated in a 2004 press release that it was "later proven that Carson and Hackett made a few lucky guesses for their routine, dispelling rumors of a security breach and keeping the integrity of the balloting process intact."[4] The Academy later hired Carson five times to host the ceremony.

41st Academy Awards
41st Academy Awards
DateApril 14, 1969
SiteDorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles
Produced byGower Champion
Directed byGower Champion
Highlights
Best PictureOliver!
Most awardsOliver! (5)
Most nominationsOliver! (11)
TV in the United States
NetworkABC

Winners

Winners are listed first, highlighted in boldface and indicated with a double dagger (double-dagger).[5][6]

Best Picture Best Director
Best Actor Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor Best Supporting Actress
Best Story and Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium
Best Documentary Feature Best Documentary Short Subject
Best Live Action Short Subject Best Short Subject – Cartoons
Best Original Score for a Motion Picture (Not a Musical) Best Score of a Musical Picture - Original or Adaptation
Best Song Original for the Picture Best Sound
Best Foreign Language Film Best Costume Design
Best Art Direction Best Cinematography
Best Film Editing Best Special Visual Effects

Multiple nominations and awards

These films had multiple nominations:

The following films received multiple awards.

Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award

Martha Raye

Honorary Awards

Presenters

  • Ingrid Bergman (Presenter: Best Actress and Best Cinematography)
  • Ingrid Bergman, Diahann Carroll, Jane Fonda, Rosalind Russell and Natalie Wood (Presenters: Best Director)
  • Diahann Carroll (Presenter: Best Special Visual Effects, Documentary Awards & the Honorary Award to Onna White)
  • Tony Curtis (Presenter: Best Supporting Actress, Short Subjects Awards and Documentary Awards)
  • Jane Fonda (Presenter: Best Foreign Language Film, Best Costume Design and Short Subjects Awards)
  • Bob Hope (Presenter: Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award to Martha Raye)
  • Burt Lancaster (Presenter: Best Actor, Best Special Visual Effects and the Scientific or Technical Awards)
  • Mark Lester (Presenter: Honorary Academy Award to Onna White)
  • Henry Mancini and Marni Nixon (Presenter: Best Original or Adaptation Score)
  • Walter Matthau (Presenter: Best Film Editing and Best Foreign Language Film)
  • Gregory Peck (Presenter: Best Original Score for a Motion Picture (Not a Musical))
  • Pink Panther (Presenters: Best Short Subject – Cartoons)[7]
  • Sidney Poitier (Presenter: Best Picture)
  • Don Rickles (Presenter: Best Story and Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen)
  • Rosalind Russell (Presenter: Best Original Score for a Motion Picture (Not a Musical), Best Sound and Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium Awards)
  • Frank Sinatra (Presenter: Best Supporting Actor, Best Song Original for the Picture and Writing Awards)
  • Natalie Wood (Presenter: Best Art Direction and the Scientific or Technical Awards)

Performers

See also

References

  1. ^ Internet Movie Database. "Awards for Stanley Kubrick". Archived from the original on 2009-01-07. Retrieved 2009-09-06.
  2. ^ "The Trade: Grand Illusion". TIME. April 25, 1969. Retrieved November 19, 2013.
  3. ^ Galveston Daily News, April 21, 1969, p.7, "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2015-10-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-01. Retrieved 2014-03-01.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "The Official Acadademy Awards® Database". Archived from the original on 2013-04-15. Retrieved 2011-10-15.
  6. ^ "The 41st Academy Awards (1969) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 2014-12-21. Retrieved 2011-10-13.
  7. ^ Jim Fanning. "All Facts, No Fluff And Stuff". Archived from the original on 2012-03-06. Retrieved 2012-01-21.
Descendants of Cain (film)

Descendants of Cain (카인의 후예 - Kaineui huye) is a 1968 South Korean film directed by Yu Hyun-mok.

Every Bastard a King

Every Bastard a King (Hebrew: כל ממזר מלך‎, translit. Kol Mamzer Melech) is a 1968 Israeli drama film directed by Uri Zohar. The film was selected as the Israeli entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 41st Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Imperiale

Imperiale (Greek: Βυζαντινή Ραψωδία, translit. Vyzantini rapsodia) is a 1968 Greek drama film directed by George Skalenakis. The film was selected as the Greek entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 41st Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

It Rains in My Village

It Rains in My Village (Serbo-Croatian: Biće skoro propast sveta or literal translation "The End of the World Is Nigh") is a 1968 Yugoslav film by Serbian director Aleksandar Petrović.

List of submissions to the 41st Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film

The following 18 films, all from different countries, were submitted for the 41st Academy Awards in the category Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The titles highlighted in blue and yellow were the five nominated films, which came from Czechoslovakia, France, Hungary, Italy and the eventual winner, the USSR.

Lyrically, Alan Bergman

Lyrically, Alan Bergman is the debut album by American lyricist Alan Bergman. It was recorded in 2007, and released later that year by Verve Records. The album consists of songs with lyrics by Bergman and his wife, Marilyn Bergman (née Keith). Alan and Marilyn Bergman have been nominated fifteen times for the Academy Award for Best Original Song, and have won twice, at the 41st Academy Awards for "Windmills of Your Mind", and for "The Way We Were" at the 46th Academy Awards, both winning songs are featured on this album.

Majhli Didi

Majhli Didi is a 1967 Bollywood film directed by Hrishikesh Mukherjee, based on the Bengali language story, Mejdidi (Middle Sister) by Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay, which was earlier filmed in Bengali in 1950 as Mejdidi. Majhli Didi stars Meena Kumari and Dharmendra.Though the film didn't perform well at the Indian box office, it remains one of Hrishikesh Mukherjee's highly rated films. At the 16th Filmfare Awards, it won Best Screenplay Awards for Nabendu Ghosh and Best Art Direction, B&W for Ajit Banerjee. It was India's entry to the 41st Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film.

Matthew's Days

Matthew's Days (Polish: Żywot Mateusza) is a 1968 Polish drama film directed by Witold Leszczyński. It was listed to compete at the 1968 Cannes Film Festival, but the festival was cancelled due to the events of May 1968 in France. The film was also selected as the Polish entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 41st Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.The film is based on Tarjei Vesaas' novel The Birds.

Oliver! (film)

Oliver! is a 1968 British musical drama film directed by Carol Reed, written by Vernon Harris, and based on the stage musical of the same name. Both the film and play are based on Charles Dickens's novel Oliver Twist. The film includes such musical numbers as "Food, Glorious Food", "Consider Yourself", "As Long as He Needs Me", "You've Got to Pick a Pocket or Two", and "Where Is Love?". Filmed at Shepperton Film Studio in Surrey, it was a Romulus Films production and was distributed internationally by Columbia Pictures.

At the 41st Academy Awards for 1968, Oliver! was nominated for eleven Academy Awards and won six, including Best Picture, Best Director for Reed, and an Honorary Award for choreographer Onna White. At the 26th Golden Globe Awards, the film won two Golden Globes: for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, and Best Actor – Musical or Comedy for Ron Moody.

The British Film Institute ranked Oliver! the 77th greatest British film of the 20th century. In 2017, a poll of 150 actors, directors, writers, producers and critics for Time Out magazine ranked it the 69th best British film ever.

Oliver! (soundtrack)

Oliver! is the soundtrack to the 1968 British musical drama film of the same name. The soundtrack won an Oscar for Best Original or Adaptation Score at the 41st Academy Awards in 1969. It reached number 4 in the UK Albums Chart and spent 99 weeks on the chart.

People Meet and Sweet Music Fills the Heart

People Meet and Sweet Music Fills the Heart, (Danish: Mennesker mødes og sød musik opstår i hjertet), is a 1967 Danish/Swedish romantic comedy directed by Henning Carlsen and starring Harriet Andersson and Preben Neergaard. The film is based upon the 1944 novel by Jens August Schade.

Robert Kennedy Remembered

Robert Kennedy Remembered is a 1968 American short documentary film produced by Charles Guggenheim. In 1969, it won an Oscar for Best Short Subject at the 41st Academy Awards.

Spain Again

Spain Again (Spanish: España otra vez) is a 1969 Spanish drama film directed by Jaime Camino. It was entered into the 1969 Cannes Film Festival. The film was also selected as the Spanish entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 41st Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

The Amorous Ones

The Amorous Ones (Portuguese: As Amorosas) is a 1968 Brazilian drama film written and directed by Walter Hugo Khouri. The film was selected as the Brazilian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 41st Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee. The film was also entered into the 1969 Melbourne International Film Festival.

The Column

The Column (Romanian: Columna) is a 1968 Romanian historical film directed by Mircea Drăgan. The film was selected as the Romanian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 41st Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.The action starts near the end of Trajan's Dacian Wars (106 AD), when south western Dacia was transformed into a Roman province: Roman Dacia. It covers the years after the war, including the beginnings of the Romanization and Romanian ethnogenesis, the construction of Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa, resistance of the Free Dacians and first barbarian invasions.

The Firemen's Ball

The Firemen's Ball (or The Fireman's Ball, Czech: Hoří, má panenko) is a 1967 comedy film directed by Miloš Forman. It is set at the annual ball of a small town's volunteer fire department, and the plot portrays the series of disasters that occur during the evening. The film uses few professional actors – the firemen portrayed are primarily played by the firemen of the small town where it was filmed. In its portrayal of the prevailing corruption of the local community, and the collapse even of well-intentioned plans, the film has widely been interpreted as a satire on the East European Communist system, and it was "banned forever" in Czechoslovakia following the Soviet invasion of 1968.

The Firemen's Ball was the last film Forman made in his native Czechoslovakia before going into exile. It is also the first film he shot in color, and a milestone of the Czechoslovak New Wave.

The House That Jack Built (1967 film)

The House That Jack Built is a 1967 National Film Board of Canada animated short based on the nursery rhyme "This Is the House That Jack Built." Directed by Ron Tunis, written by Don Arioli and produced by Wolf Koenig, the eight-minute film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, losing to Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day at the 41st Academy Awards. Jack is desperate to escape his nine-to-five life. Mirroring the fairy tale, he trades his car for a handful of beans.

The Sands of Kurobe

The Sun of Kurobe (黒部の太陽, Kurobe no Taiyō) is a 1968 Japanese drama film directed by Kei Kumai. It was Japan's submission to the 41st Academy Awards for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Awards of Merit
Special awards
Former awards
Ceremonies‡
Footnote

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.