3rd Primetime Emmy Awards

The 3rd Emmy Awards, retroactively known as the 3rd Primetime Emmy Awards after the debut of the Daytime Emmy Awards, were presented at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, California on January 23, 1951.

This would be the last year that the Emmys were primarily given out to shows that were produced or aired in the Los Angeles area. Starting with the 4th Annual Emmy Awards, nominations were considered on a national television network basis.

3rd Primetime Emmy Awards
DateJanuary 23, 1951
LocationAmbassador Hotel, Los Angeles, California
Presented byAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted byEarl Warren
Television/radio coverage
NetworkKLAC

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Best Dramatic Show Best Children's Show
Best Games and Audience Participation Show Best Cultural Show
  • Campus Chorus and Orchestra, (KTSL)
    • Designed for Women, (KNBH)
    • Vienna Philharmonic, (KTTV)
    • Sunset Service, (KNBH)
    • The Woman's Voice, (KTTV)
Best Educational Show Best News Program
  • KFI-TV University, (KFI)
    • Kieran's Kaleidoscope, (KECA)
    • Know Your Schools, (KFI)
    • Magazine of the Week, (KTLA)
    • Zoo Parade, (KNBH)
  • KTLA Newsreel, (KTLA)
    • Clete Roberts, (KLAC)
    • Ford News and Weather, (KNBH)
    • Fleetwood Lawton, (KTSL)
Best Variety Show Best Sports Program
  • Los Angeles Rams Football, (KNBH)
    • College Basketball Games, (KTTV)
    • College Football Games, (KTTV)
    • Hollywood Baseball, (KLAC)
    • Los Angeles Baseball, (KFI)
Best Public Service
  • City at Night, (KTLA)
    • Classified Column, (KTTV)
    • In Our Time, (KTTV)
    • Community Chest Kickoff
    • Teleforum, (KTLA)
    • Marshall Plan, (KECA)

Acting

Best Actor Best Actress

Hosting

Most Outstanding Personality

Special Events

Best Special Events
  • Departure of Marines to Korea, (KTLA)
    • Arrival of Cruiser from Korea, (KTLA)
    • Commissioning of Hospital Ship Haven
    • Election Coverage, (KECA)
    • Tournament of Roses, (KECA)

Station Awards

  • KTLA for Station Achievement
  • KNBH for Technical Achievement

References

  1. ^ Emmys.com list of 1951 Nominees & Winners

External links

23rd Academy Awards

The 23rd Academy Awards Ceremony awarded Oscars for the best in films in 1950. All About Eve received 14 Oscar nominations, beating the previous record of 13 set by Gone with the Wind.

Sunset Boulevard became the second film with nominations in every acting category not to win a single one (after My Man Godfrey in 1936). This would not happen again until American Hustle was shut out at the 86th Academy Awards.

All About Eve was the second film, after Mrs. Miniver (1942), to receive five acting nominations. It also became the first to receive multiple nominations in two acting categories, and the first (and, to date, only) film to receive four female acting nominations--two each for Best Actress in a Leading Role and Best Actress in a Supporting Role. None was successful, losing to Judy Holliday in Born Yesterday and Josephine Hull in Harvey, respectively.

24th Academy Awards

The 24th Academy Awards honored the best in film in 1951, as recognized by the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Best Picture was awarded to An American in Paris, which, like A Place in the Sun, received six Academy Awards. A Streetcar Named Desire won four Oscars, including three of the acting awards. The film's only unsuccessful acting nomination was that of Marlon Brando, whose performance as Stanley Kowalski was later considered one of the most influential of modern film acting.Humphrey Bogart was the last man born in the 19th century to win a leading role Oscar.

An American in Paris became the second color film to win Best Picture, after 1939's Gone with the Wind.

4th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 4th Emmy Awards, retroactively known as the 4th Primetime Emmy Awards after the debut of the Daytime Emmy Awards, were presented at the Cocoanut Grove in Los Angeles, California on February 18, 1952. The ceremonies were hosted by Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz.

This was the first year that nominations were considered on a national television network basis. Previously, the Emmys were primarily given out to shows that were produced or aired in the Los Angeles area.

Carol Burnett

Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933) is an American actress, comedian, singer and writer, whose career spans seven decades of television. She is best known for her groundbreaking television variety show, The Carol Burnett Show, originally aired on CBS. It was the first of its kind to be hosted by a woman. She has achieved success on stage, television and film in varying genres including dramatic and comedic roles. She has also appeared on various talk shows and as a panelist on game shows.

Born in San Antonio, Texas, Burnett moved with her grandmother to Hollywood, where she attended Hollywood High School and eventually studied theater and musical comedy at UCLA. Later she performed in nightclubs in New York City and had a breakout success on Broadway in 1959 in Once Upon a Mattress, for which she received a Tony Award nomination. She soon made her television debut, regularly appearing on The Garry Moore Show for the next three years, and won her first Emmy Award in 1962. Burnett had her television special debut in 1963 when she starred as Calamity Jane in the Dallas State Fair Musicals production of Calamity Jane on CBS. Burnett moved to Los Angeles, California, and began an 11-year run as star of The Carol Burnett Show on CBS television from 1967 to 1978. With its vaudeville roots, The Carol Burnett Show was a variety show that combined comedy sketches with song and dance. The comedy sketches included film parodies and character pieces. Burnett created many memorable characters during the show's run, and both she and the show won numerous Emmy and Golden Globe Awards.

During and after her variety show, Burnett appeared in many television and film projects. Her film roles include Pete 'n' Tillie (1972), The Front Page (1974), The Four Seasons (1981), Annie (1982), Noises Off (1992), and Horton Hears a Who! (2008). On television, she has appeared in other sketch shows; in dramatic roles in 6 Rms Riv Vu (1974) and Friendly Fire (1979); in various well-regarded guest roles, such as in Mad About You, for which she won an Emmy Award; and in specials with Julie Andrews, Dolly Parton, Beverly Sills, and others. She returned to the Broadway stage in 1995 in Moon Over Buffalo, for which she was again nominated for a Tony Award.

Burnett has written and narrated several memoirs, earning Grammy nominations for almost all of them, and a win for In Such Good Company: Eleven Years Of Laughter, Mayhem, And Fun In The Sandbox.In 2005, she was recognized as "one of America's most cherished entertainers" and awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom "for enhancing the lives of millions of Americans and for her extraordinary contributions to American entertainment."

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