3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division

The 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division ("Third Grey Wolf Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division"[1]) is a combined arms armored brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division. Its major equipment includes M1A2SEP Tanks, M2A3 & M3A3 Bradley infantry fighting vehicles, M109A6 Paladin howitzers, and M1114 up-armored Humvees.

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division
USA - 1st Cavalry 3rd Brigade
3rd Brigade logo
Founded1917
CountryUnited States
Branch United States Army
Nickname(s)"Grey Wolf"[1]

Regiments

Heraldry

The 3rd Brigade is a subordinate component of the 1st Cavalry Division and wears the same shoulder sleeve insignia.

Initial organization

The 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division was first constituted on 29 August 1917. It was organized in December 1917 as Headquarters, 3rd Brigade, an element of the 15th Cavalry Division. The brigade demobilized on 15 July 1919. The brigade was reconstituted on 10 August 1921, joining the newly constituted 1st Cavalry Division. Never officially reorganized, the Brigade remained on inactive status until its activation on 15 October 1940.

World War II

The brigade was converted and redesignated as HHC, 9th Armored Division Trains, and the unit deployed to the European Theater where it received campaign participation credit for the operations in Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, and Central Europe. The unit was awarded two Meritorious Unit Commendations with streamers embroidered Europe 1944 and Europe 1945. Following World War II, the unit returned to the United States and was inactivated.

South Korea

The brigade remained inactive until 15 July 1963, when it was relieved from assignment to the 9th Armored Division, converted and redesignated as HHC, 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. The brigade was activated on 1 September 1963, with the Division on station in Korea at the Korean Demilitarized Zone.

Vietnam War

In July 1965, the division colors moved to Fort Benning and underwent reorganization as an airmobile unit. No soldiers moved, and the soldiers remaining in Korea put on the patch of the 2nd Infantry Division. The brigade was filled with soldiers from the 2nd Infantry Division and the 11th Airborne Division.

The 3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmoble) sailed from Charleston, South Carolina to Qui Nhơn, Republic of Vietnam on 17 September 1965. The first major action undertaken by the brigade began on 10 October 1965, and was followed by participation in the Battle of Ia Drang (14 November, 15,17) officially known as the Pleiku Campaign. The 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) received the Presidential Unit Citation for the period 23 October to 26 November 1965.

The 3rd Brigade was formed into a separate unit and assumed operational control of the old 1st Cavalry Division area of operations in South Vietnam until 10 April 1971.

In 1972, the brigade left South Vietnam for Fort Hood, Texas, to rejoin the 1st Cavalry Division. When its colors arrived at Fort Hood on 29 June 1972, the unit officially became the "Greywolf" Brigade, named after General George Crook, considered the U.S. Army's greatest Indian fighter. The brigade underwent a change from an airmobile configuration to an infantry brigade (heavy or mechanized infantry). The "Greywolf" Brigade remained with the division until its inactivation in 1980.

The 3rd Brigade was composed of the following elements:

  • HHC, 3d Brigade
  • 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry
  • 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry
  • 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry (added while the unit was in South Vietnam)
  • F Troop, 9th Cavalry

Post Operation Desert Storm

The brigade remained on the inactive roles until 21 May 1991, when the 1st "Tiger" Brigade, 2nd Armored Division was redesignated as the 3rd "Greywolf" Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division. Since that time, the brigade has participated in several National Training Center rotations, deployed task force sized elements to Kuwait, and in September 1996, conducted the first post- Desert Storm, no-notice, brigade-sized deployment to Kuwait in support of Operation Desert Strike.

Operation Iraqi Freedom II

Baghdad - airport and green zone
Aerial view and map of the Green Zone in Baghdad

In early 2004, 3d Brigade began deploying to Iraq for Operation Iraqi Freedom. The brigade protected the Green Zone and surrounding neighborhoods in Baghdad. The last elements returned home in March 2005.

The brigade was organized as follows:

  • HHC, 3d Brigade
  • 1st Battalion, 9th Cavalry
  • 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry
  • 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry
  • F Troop, 9th Cavalry
  • 2nd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery
  • 8th Engineer Battalion
  • 215th Forward Support Battalion

The brigade re-task organized in Kuwait before entering Iraq:

Also attached were:

The brigade received the following unit citations:

  • HHC, 3rd Brigade was awarded a Meritorious Unit Citation (MUC) for the period of 17 March 2004 through 23 March 2005.
  • 1st Battalion, 153rd Infantry was awarded an MUC (17 March 2004 – 23 March 2005)
  • 1st Battalion, 161st Infantry was awarded an MUC (17 March 2004 – 23 March 2005)
  • 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry was awarded an MUC (23 March 2004 – 5 March 2005)
  • 2nd Battalion, 82nd Artillery was awarded an MUC (17 March 2004 – 23 March 2005)

Modularization

Under the modularization of the 1st Cavalry Division, two battalions were transferred to 4th Brigade and the 8th Engineers were inactivated. One battalion was transferred in from 1st Brigade, F Troop was expanded into a squadron, and a special troops battalion was organized.

  • HHC, 3d BCT
  • 6th Squadron (RSTA), 9th Cavalry Regiment
  • 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment
  • 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment
  • 2nd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment
  • Special Troops Battalion[2]
  • 215th Support Battalion (Brigade)

Operation Iraqi Freedom 2006–07

In September 2006 the 3rd "Greywolf" Brigade began deploying to Iraq for its second OIF combat tour. During this tour, it was deployed to the Diyala Province and based out of Baqubah. While serving as the main regional force for Coalition efforts in the area it fell under the command of Multi-National Division-North (MND-N). During the 2006–2008 tour MND-N was commanded by the 25th Infantry Division and based out of COB Speicher in Tikrit. The brigade was a part of the controversial theater "extension" that increased all combat tours to 15 months. This pushed their re-deployment home from theater to December 2007.

Operation Iraqi Freedom 2008–09

In December 2008 the Greywolf Troopers deployed to Iraq for their third tour. On 19 January 2009, they assumed control of FOB Marez in Mosul from the "Brave Rifles" of the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment. As during their last Iraq rotation the Greywolf Brigade were once again under the 25th Infantry Division and MND-N.[3]

Operation New Dawn 2011

In February 2011, the Greywolf Brigade deployed to the southern provinces of Iraq with forces in Muthanna, Dhi Qar, Maysan and Basrah. The primary mission of the brigade was to continue to improve Iraqi Army and Police forces through an Advise and Assist mission. Their secondary mission was to conduct route security missions to assist in maintaining open ground lines of communication. Both missions would support the United States military forces eventual departure from Iraq in December 2011. On 17 December 2011, Greywolf's Special Troops Battalion was the last combat unit to redeploy from the war-torn nation, thus ending America's 9-year long war.

Reorganization

With the inactivation of the 4th Brigade Combat Team "Long Knife" in 2013, 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment rejoined the Brigade after 8 years.[4][5] The 3rd Engineer Battalion replaced the 3rd Special troops Battalion which had been formed from the 8th Engineer Battalion in 2005.

Current Organization

Campaign participation credit

Conflict[6] Streamer Year(s)
World War II
European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal streamer
Rhineland 1944
Ardennes-Alsace 1944
Central Europe 1944
Vietnam War
Streamer VS
Vietnam Defense 1965
Counteroffensive, Phase I 1965–1966
Counteroffensive, Phase II 1966–1967
Counteroffensive, Phase III 1967–1968
Tet Counteroffensive 1968
Counteroffensive, Phase IV 1968
Counteroffensive, Phase V 1968
Counteroffensive, Phase VI 1968–1969
Tet 69/Counteroffensive 1969
Summer–Fall 1969 1969
Winter–Spring 1970 1970
Sanctuary Counteroffensive 1970
Counteroffensive, Phase VII 1970–1971
Consolidation I 1971
Consolidation II 1971–1972
Cease-Fire 1972–1973
Iraq War
Iraq Campaign streamer
Iraqi Governance 2004
National Resolution 2005
Iraqi Surge 2008
Iraqi Sovereignty 2009
New Dawn 2011

Decorations

Ribbon Award Year Inscription
Streamer PUC Army Army Presidential Unit Citation 23 October to 26 November 1965 PLEIKU PROVINCE
Streamer VUA Army Army Valorous Unit Award QUANG TIN PROVINCE
Streamer VUA Army Army Valorous Unit Award May 1970 FISH HOOK
Streamer MUC Army Army Meritorious Unit Commendation 1944 EUROPE 1944
Streamer MUC Army Army Meritorious Unit Commendation 1945 EUROPE 1945
Streamer MUC Army Army Meritorious Unit Commendation 2004–2005 IRAQ
Streamer MUC Army Army meritorious Unit Commendation 2008–2009 IRAQ
Streamer MUC Army Army Meritorious Unit Commendation 2011 IRAQ
VGCP Streamer Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm 1965–1969 VIETNAM
VGCP Streamer Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm 1969–1970 VIETNAM
VGCP Streamer Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm 1970–1971 VIETNAM
VGCP Streamer Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm 1971–1972 VIETNAM
Streamer RVMUCCA Republic of Vietnam Civil Actions Medal with Palm 1969–1970 VIETNAM

See also

1st Cavalry Division

1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division

2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division

References

  1. ^ a b "Special Unit Designations". United States Army Center of Military History. 21 April 2010. Archived from the original on 9 June 2010. Retrieved 23 June 2010.
  2. ^ http://www.tioh.hqda.pentagon.mil/Heraldry/ArmyDUISSICOA/ArmyHeraldryUnit.aspx?u=4386
  3. ^ "www.mnf-iraq.com". Archived from the original on 11 February 2009. Retrieved 21 January 2009.
  4. ^ http://www.dvidshub.net/news/printable/115302 Archived 2 November 2014 at the Wayback Machine ‘Long Knife’ Brigade cases colors, turns new chapter during inactivation ceremony
  5. ^ http://www.forthoodsentinel.com/story.php?id=12275 Archived 2 November 2014 at the Wayback Machine Long Knife cases colors
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 14 November 2014. Retrieved 2 November 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
Bibliography

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Center of Military History document "Headquarters, 3d Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division Lineage and Honors".

External links

12th Cavalry Regiment

The 12th Cavalry is a cavalry regiment of the United States Army.

3rd Brigade Combat Team

3rd Brigade Combat Team or 3 BCT is a modularized brigade of the United States Army. It may refer to:

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division (United States)

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division (United States)

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division (United States)

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division (United States)

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division (United States)

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division (United States)

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (United States)

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division (United States)

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division

3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (United States)

8th Cavalry Regiment

The 8th Cavalry Regiment is a regiment of the United States Army formed in 1866 during the American Indian Wars. The 8th Cavalry continued to serve under a number of designations, fighting in every other major US conflict since, except World War I, when it was not deployed to Europe because it was already engaged in the Punitive Expedition in Mexico from 1916 to 1920. It is currently a component of the 1st Cavalry Division.

9th Cavalry Regiment (United States)

The 9th Cavalry Regiment is a parent cavalry regiment of the United States Army.

Historically, it was one of a few segregated African American regiments. The unit served in combat during the Indian and Spanish–American Wars. During Westward Expansion, the unit provided security to the early western settlers and the early American borders against Indian bands, Mexican encroachment, and criminal elements.

As of 2019, the 1st Battalion and 4th Squadron serve with the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division as a combined arms battalion and an armored reconnaissance squadron, respectively, while the 6th Squadron is the armored reconnaissance squadron of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team of the division. All three units are stationed at Fort Hood.

Battle of Baqubah

The Battle of Baqubah II (March–August 2007) took place during the Iraq War in the capital of the Iraqi province Diyala, to the north-east of Baghdad. It began in early March 2007, when US and Iraqi forces commenced preliminary operations to "establish a presence in Diyala beyond their Forward Operating Base".In June 2007 as part of a larger country wide offensive, Operation Arrowhead Ripper was launched to gain control of Baqubah and its surrounding areas from the insurgents. Baqubah was largely pacified as a result of this operation although insurgent presence still remained in the capital and throughout the province.

In August 2007, Operation Phantom Strike was launched throughout northern Iraq in order to capitalize on the gains made during Operation Phantom Thunder. As part of this offensive, Operation Lightning Hammer was launched to the northeast of Baqubah.

Combined Joint Task Force 7

Combined Joint Task Force 7 was the interim military formation that directed the U.S. effort in Iraq between June 2003 and May 2004. It replaced the Coalition Forces Land Component Command on 14 June 2003. CFLCC was the land forces component of United States Central Command that carried out the initial invasion of Iraq, was established by Commander, U.S. Army Forces Central Command, in 2002/3, to oversee two corps-sized organizations, I Marine Expeditionary Force (I MEF) and V Corps. These two corps-level formations carried out Operation Iraqi Freedom which began on 20 March 2003.

In a meeting which Commander-in-Chief Central Command, General Tommy Franks held with his officers after the announcement of the Coalition Provisional Authority in late April 2003, it was decided that a new Combined Joint Task Force, headed by a three-star general, would be the best organisation to take over from the CFLCC. General Gene Renuart chose the new force's number, 7, as that was the number his son had worn on his soccer uniform. Lieutenant General Ricardo Sanchez was selected to lead the new force, drawing on the V Corps staff with senior officer augmentation from across the army.The United States deployed more than seven-eighths percent of the soldiers in the occupying coalition with the majority of other troops coming from the United Kingdom and the rest made up from several other allies. Their status as Coalition Provisional Authority, or "Occupying Powers" under a United Nations resolution changed when the new government came to power on June 28, 2004, although they were still heavily influenced by the massive U.S. military and diplomatic presence in the country.India’s government announced on July 14, 2003, that it would need explicit United Nations authorization before it would send troops to Iraq. The decision was a setback to U.S. officials, who had hoped for a division of 17,000 Indian soldiers to help relieve U.S. forces in the north of the country.The Task Force was replaced by Multi-National Force - Iraq and Multi-National Corps - Iraq on 15 May 2004.

Gary J. Volesky

Gary J. Volesky (born September 7, 1961) is a United States Army lieutenant general who serves as commander of I Corps. He previously served as commander of the 101st Airborne Division and commander of the American ground forces in Iraq as part of Combined Joint Task Force – Operation Inherent Resolve.

George Crook

George R. Crook (September 8, 1828 – March 21, 1890) was a career United States Army officer, most noted for his distinguished service during the American Civil War and the Indian Wars. During the 1880s, the Apache nicknamed Crook Nantan Lupan, which means "Chief Wolf."

Katum Camp

Katum Camp (also known as Katum Special Forces Camp or Firebase Katum) is a former U.S. Army and Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) base northeast of Tây Ninh in southern Vietnam.

Operation Phantom Strike

Operation Phantom Strike was a major offensive launched by the Multi-National Corps - Iraq on 15 August 2007 in a crackdown to disrupt both the al-Qaeda-affiliated Islamic State of Iraq and Shia insurgent operations in Iraq. It consisted of a number of simultaneous operations throughout Iraq focused on pursuing remaining ISI terrorists and Iranian-supported insurgent groups. It was concluded in January 2008 and followed up with Operation Phantom Phoenix.

Operation Phantom Thunder

Operation Phantom Thunder began on 16 June 2007, when Multi-National Force-Iraq launched major offensive operations against al-Qaeda and other extremist terrorists operating throughout Iraq. Operation Phantom Thunder was a corps level operation, including Operation Arrowhead Ripper in Diyala Province, Operation Marne Torch and Operation Commando Eagle in Babil Province, Operation Fardh al-Qanoon in Baghdad, Operation Alljah in Anbar Province, and continuing special forces actions against the Mahdi Army in southern Iraq and against Al-Qaeda leadership throughout the country. The operation was one of the biggest military operations in Iraq since the U.S. invasion in 2003.

Operation Saber Guardian

Operation Saber Guardian was a joint operation between 3rd Battalion, 3rd Brigade, 5th Iraqi Army soldiers, local concerned citizens, and 6-9 Armored Reconnaissance Squadron, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. The operation, targeted at al-Qaida leadership near the town of Sherween, Iraq, resulted in 20 al-Qaida terrorists killed, 20 detained, and two weapons caches and 12 improvised explosive devices discovered.

Ronald Kirklin

Brigadier General Ronald Kirklin is a serving general officer in the United States Army. Kirklin was the 53rd Quartermaster General and Commandant of the Quartermaster School at Fort Lee, Virginia from 2014 to 2016.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.