3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment

The 3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment is an air defense artillery regiment of the United States Army first formed in 1821 as the 3rd Regiment of Artillery.

3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment
3 ADA COA
Active1821
Country United States
Branch United States Army
TypeAir defense artillery
Motto(s)NON CEDO FERIO (yield not, strike).
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Braxton Bragg
Walker Keith Armistead
Robert Anderson
Romeyn B. Ayres
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia
3 ADA Rgt DUI

History

Constituted 1 June 1821 in the Regular Army as the 3rd Regiment of Artillery and organized from existing units with headquarters at Fort Washington, Maryland

The photographic history of the Civil War - thousands of scenes photographed 1861-65, with text by many special authorities (1911) (14739801596)
Mixed formation of the 2nd and 3rd U.S. Artillery near Fair Oaks, Virginia.

Twelve batteries of the 3rd US Artillery served in the American Civil War.[1]

Four batteries of the Third U.S. Artillery were assigned to Fort Jefferson, Florida in 1869.[2]

Regiment broken up 13 February 1901 and its elements reorganized and redesignated as separate numbered companies and batteries of the Artillery Corps.

Reconstituted 1 July 1924 in the Regular Army as the 3rd Coast Artillery (Harbor Defense) (Type B) and organized (less Batteries C, F, and G) with headquarters and Batteries A & B at Fort MacArthur, California in the Harbor Defenses of Los Angeles. The regiment was organized by redesignating the 25th, 26th, 27th, 28th, 31st, 34th, 35th, and 36th companies of the Coast Artillery Corps (CAC). Batteries A, B, D, and E carried the lineage and designations of the corresponding batteries in the old 3rd Artillery.[3][4] HHB 2nd Bn and Btry D at Fort Rosecrans, CA (HD San Diego) (Btry C inactive), and HHB 3rd Bn and Btry E at Fort Stevens, Oregon (HD Columbia River) (Btrys F & G inactive).[3]

Batteries A and B inactivated 1 March 1930 at San Pedro and Fort MacArthur, California, respectively; Batteries A and F activated 1 July 1939 at Fort MacArthur, California, and Fort Stevens, Oregon, respectively; Battery D inactivated 1 February 1940 at Fort Rosecrans, California (replaced by Battery A, 19th Coast Artillery), with Batteries E & F inactivated at Fort Stevens, Oregon (they became Batteries A & B, 18th Coast Artillery);[5] Battery B activated 1 July 1940 at Fort MacArthur, California; Batteries C, D, E, and F activated 2 December 1940 at Fort MacArthur, California; Batteries B & D exchanged designations mid-December 1940; Battery G (searchlight battery) activated 1 June 1941 at Los Angeles, California; Battery G inactivated 29 August 1941 at Los Angeles, California; Battery G activated 14 February 1942 at Fort MacArthur, California; Batteries C & D exchanged designations 1 October 1942.[3]

Regiment reorganized as Type A[6] 21 August 1941.[3]

Regiment broken up 18 October 1944 and its elements reorganized and redesignated as follows:[7]

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery as Battery B, 521st Coast Artillery Battalion.

1st, 2d, and 3d Battalions as the 520th, 521st, and 522nd Coast Artillery Battalions, respectively.

After 18 October 1944 the above units underwent changes as follows:[8]

520th CA Battalion redesignated as 3rd CA Battalion 1 December 1944.

3rd CA Battalion, 521st CA Battalion, and 522nd CA Battalion, disbanded 15 September 1945 at Fort MacArthur, California.

Reconstituted 28 June 1950 in the Regular Army and redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3d Antiaircraft Artillery Group Activated 11 June 1951 at Camp Stewart, Georgia Redesignated 20 March 1958 as Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3d Artillery Group. Inactivated 15 December 1961 at Norfolk, Virginia.

520th Coast Artillery Battalion redesignated 1 December 1944 as the 3d Coast Artillery Battalion. Disbanded 15 September 1945 at Fort MacArthur, California. Reconstituted 20 January 1950 in the Regular Army; concurrently consolidated with the 3d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (active) (see ANNEX 1) and consolidated unit designated as the 3d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, an element of the 3d Infantry Division Redesignated 15 April 1953 as the 3d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion Inactivated 1 July 1957 at Fort Benning, Georgia, and relieved from assignment to the 3d Infantry Division.

521st Coast Artillery Battalion disbanded 15 September 1945 at Fort MacArthur, California. Reconstituted 28 June 1950 in the Regular Army and redesignated as the 18th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion Redesignated 13 March 1952 as the 18th Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion Activated 2 May 1952 at Fort Custer, Michigan Redesignated 24 July 1953 as the 18th Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion Redesignated 15 June 1957 as the 18th Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion. Inactivated 1 September 1958 at Detroit, Michigan.

522nd Coast Artillery Battalion disbanded 15 September 1945 at Huntington Beach (Bolsa Chica Military Reservation), California. Reconstituted 28 June 1950 in the Regular Army; concurrently consolidated with the 43d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion (active) (see ANNEX 2) and consolidated unit designated as the 43d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, an element of the 10th Infantry Division. Redesignated 15 June 1954 as the 43d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalion Relieved 16 May 1957 from assignment to the 10th Infantry Division Inactivated 14 November 1957 in Germany.

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 3d Artillery Group; 18th Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion; 3d and 43d Antiaircraft Artillery Battalions; and the 3d Armored Field Artillery Battalion (organized in 1907) consolidated, reorganized, and redesignated 15 December 1961 as the 3d Artillery, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System.

3d Artillery (less former 3d Armored Field Artillery Battalion) reorganized and redesignated 1 September 1971 as the 3d Air Defense Artillery, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System (former 3d Armored Field Artillery Battalion concurrently reorganized and redesignated as the 3d Field Artillery – hereafter separate lineage).

Withdrawn 16 July 1989 from the Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System.

ANNEX 1

Constituted 6 July 1942 in the Army of the United States as the 534th Coast Artillery Battalion

Activated 15 July 1942 at Fort Bliss, Texas

Redesignated 12 December 1943 as the 534th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion

Inactivated 19 October 1945 at Camp Patrick Henry, Virginia

Redesignated 9 December 1948 as the 3d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion and allotted to the Regular Army

Activated 15 January 1949 at Fort Bliss, Texas

(3d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion assigned 22 November 1949 to the 3d Infantry Division)

ANNEX 2

Constituted 5 May 1942 in the Army of the United States as the 2d Battalion, 504th Coast Artillery

Activated 1 July 1942 at Camp Hulen, Texas

Reorganized and redesignated 20 January 1943 as the 630th Coast Artillery Battalion

Redesignated 12 December 1943 as the 630th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion

Inactivated 26 September 1945 in Italy

Redesignated 18 June 1948 as the 43d Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion and assigned to the 10th Infantry Division

Activated 1 July 1948 at Fort Riley, Kansas

Honors

Campaign participation credit

War of 1812: Canada

Indian Wars: Seminoles; Washington 1858

Mexican War: Palo Alto; Resaca de la Palma; Monterey; Buena Vista; Vera Cruz; Cerro Gordo; Contreras; Churubusco; Molino del Rey; Chapultepec; Puebla 1847

Civil War: Peninsula; Antietam; Fredericksburg; Chancellorsville; Gettysburg Wilderness; Spotsylvania; Petersburg; Shenandoah; Mississippi 1863; Tennessee 1863; Tennessee 1864; Virginia 1863

War with Spain: Manila

World War II: Naples-Foggia (with arrowhead); Anzio (with arrowhead); Rome-Arno Southern France (with arrowhead); North Apennines; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe; Po Valley

Korean War: CCF Intervention; First UN Counteroffensive; CCF Spring Offensive; UN Summer-Fall Offensive; Second Korean Winter; Korea, Summer-Fall 1952; Third Korean Winter Korea, Summer 1953

Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait; Cease-Fire

Decorations

  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army) for EUROPEAN THEATER

Current configuration

  • 1st Battalion 3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment [9]
  • 2nd Battalion 3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment
  • 3rd Battalion 3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment
  • 4th Battalion 3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment [10]
  • 5th Battalion 3rd Air Defense Artillery Regiment

See also

References

  1. ^ Civil War Archive list of Regular Army regiments and batteries
  2. ^ Reid, Thomas. America's Fortress. Gainesville: University Press of Florida. p. 123. ISBN 9780813030197.
  3. ^ a b c d Gaines, pp. 5-6
  4. ^ Berhow, pp. 441-442
  5. ^ Gaines, pp. 12-13
  6. ^ Berhow, pp. 488-493
  7. ^ Stanton, p. 455
  8. ^ Stanton, pp. 483, 502
  9. ^ 1/3 ADA at GlobalSecurity.org
  10. ^ 4/3 ADA home page

External links

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Air Defense Artillery Branch

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Artillery formations of the United States
Misc. formations
Air Defense Artillery
Coast Artillery
Field Artillery

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