3C 79

3C 79 is a Seyfert Galaxy[1] located in the constellation Aries. The extended emission-line region (EELR) is almost certainly photoionized by the hidden quasar.[3]

3C 79
Observation data (Epoch J2000)
ConstellationAries
Right ascension 03h 09m 59.70s[1]
Declination+17° 05′ 58.0″[1]
Redshift0.2559[2]
Distance2.9 billion light-years
(Light travel time)[2]
3.2 billion light-years
(present)[2]
TypeSy2[2]
FR II[2]
narrow-line radio galaxy[3]
Apparent dimensions (V)0.25'X0.19'
Apparent magnitude (V)19.0[2]
Other designations
DA 93, LEDA 1524618, 3C 79, 4C 16.07, PGC 1524618, QSO B0307+169
See also: Quasar, List of quasars

References

  1. ^ a b c SIMBAD
  2. ^ a b c d e f "NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database". Results for 3C 079. Retrieved 2006-10-26.
  3. ^ a b Fu, Hai; Stockton, Alan (2008). "The Host Galaxy and the Extended Emission-Line Region of the Radio Galaxy 3C 79". The Astrophysical Journal. 677 (1): 79–91. arXiv:0712.4145. Bibcode:2008ApJ...677...79F. doi:10.1086/529015. Retrieved 2010-04-24.

External links

Nu Arietis

Nu Arietis, Latinized from ν Arietis, is the Bayer designation for a white-hued star in the northern constellation of Aries. It is faintly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +5.43. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 9.68 mas as seen from Earth, it is located roughly 340 light years from the Sun. It is moving away from the Sun with a radial velocity of 8 km/s.This is an A-type main sequence star with a stellar classification of A7 V. Nu Arietis has an estimated 2.4 times the mass of the Sun and about 1.8 times the Sun's radius. The star is radiating 63.5 times the Sun's luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of around 8,000 K. It is roughly 621 million years old and is spinning with a projected rotational velocity of 133 km/s. A close companion was discovered in 2016 using the direct spectral detection method.

Omicron Arietis

Omicron Arietis, Latinized from ο Arietis, is the Bayer designation for a single, blue-white hued star in the northern constellation of Aries. It has an apparent visual magnitude of +5.78, which means it is dimly visible to the naked eye. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 5.49 mas as seen from Earth, it is located roughly 590 light years from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude of the star is diminished by an extinction factor of 0.22 due to interstellar dust.This is a B-type main sequence star with a stellar classification of B9 Vn. The 'n' suffix indicates that it has nebulous absorption lines in its spectrum, which are caused by the Doppler effect and rapid rotation. Indeed, it has a projected rotational velocity of 225 km/s. The star has an estimated 3.45 times the mass of the Sun and about 3.1 times the Sun's radius. It is radiating energy from its photosphere at 248 times the Sun's luminosity with an effective temperature of 10,715 K.

Xi Arietis

Xi Arietis, Latinized from ξ Arietis, is the Bayer designation for a binary star system in the northern constellation of Aries. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 5.46, and so is dimly visible to the naked eye. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 3.74±0.29 mas as seen from Earth, it is 872 ± 68 light-years (267 ± 21 parsecs) distant from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude of the star is diminished by an extinction factor of 0.24 due to interstellar dust.This is a double-lined spectroscopic binary. The spectrum matches a stellar classification of B7 IV, which would indicate a subgiant star that has exhausted the supply of hydrogen at its core and is in the process of evolving into a giant star. Xi Arietis was once a designation for Psi Ceti (ψ Cet, ψ Ceti).

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