3C 438

3C 438 is a Seyfert galaxy[1][2] located in the constellation Cygnus.

3C 438
Observation data (Epoch J2000)
ConstellationCygnus
Right ascension 21h 55m 52.324s[1]
Declination+38° 00′ 28.51″[1]
Redshift0.290[2]
Distance (comoving)1,113 megaparsecs (3,630 Mly) h−1
0.73
[2]
TypeSyG, AGN, X, G, QSO[1]
G, FR II, Sy[2]
Apparent magnitude (V)19.20[2]
Other designations
LEDA 2817736, 3C 438, 4C 37.63
See also: Quasar, List of quasars

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Query : 3C 438". Simbad. Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2 June 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e "NED results for object 3C 438". NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Retrieved 2 June 2015.

External links

Coordinates: Sky map 21h 55m 52.324s, +38° 00′ 28.51″

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