3C 303

3C 303 is a Seyfert galaxy[1][2] with a quasar-like appearance located in the constellation Boötes.

3C 303
Observation data (Epoch J2000)
ConstellationBoötes
Right ascension 14h 43m 02.76070s[1]
Declination+52° 01′ 37.2982″[1]
Redshift0.141186[2]
Distance (comoving)564 megaparsecs (1.84×109 ly) h−1
0.73
[2]
TypeSy1, Rad, AGN, IR, X, AG?, QSO, G[1]
G, FR II, Sy 1.5[2]
Apparent magnitude (V)18.29[1]
Other designations
DA 369, 3C 303, QSO B1441+5214
See also: Quasar, List of quasars

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Query : 3C 303". Simbad. Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2 June 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d "NED results for object 3C 303". NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. Retrieved 2 June 2015.

External links

Chi Boötis

Chi Boötis, Latinized as χ Boötis, is a single, white-hued star in the constellation Boötes. It is faintly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +5.3. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 12.92 mas as seen from the Earth, it is located about 252 light years from the Sun. The star is moving closer to the Sun with a radial velocity of −16 km/s.This is an A-type main-sequence star with a stellar classification of A2 V, which indicates it is generating energy via hydrogen fusion at its core. It is about 340 million years old with a projected rotational velocity of 84 km/s. The star has double the mass of the Sun, 2.24 times the Sun's radius, and is emitting 37 times the Sun's luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of around 9,268 K. It displays an infrared excess at an emission temperature of 65 K, indicating there is a circumstellar disk of dust orbiting the star at a distance of around 123 AU.

Mu Boötis

Mu Boötis, Latinized from μ Boötis, consists of a pair of double stars in the northern constellation of Boötes. The primary pair, components Aa, are designated μ1 Boötis and have an angular separation of 0.08″. The secondary, consisting of components BC, is designated μ2 Boötis and they have a separation of 2.2″. The two double star systems are separated by 107″, with matching parallaxes and proper motions, suggesting they form a system. However, compents BC have a different chemical composition compared to Aa, indicating this may instead be a close encounter between two binary systems.Mu Boötis had the traditional name Alkalurops, although the International Astronomical Union now regards that name as only applying to μ1 Boötis.Mu Boötis is approximately 121 light-years from the Sun.

Nu1 Boötis

Nu1 Boötis (ν1 Boötis) is an orange-hued star in the northern constellation of Boötes. It has an apparent visual magnitude of +5.02, which indicates the star is faintly visible to the naked eye. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 7.59 mas as seen from Earth, it is located roughly 430 light years distant from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude of the star is diminished by an extinction of 0.13 due to interstellar dust.This is an evolved K-type giant star with a stellar classification of K4.5 IIIb Ba0.4. The 'Ba0.4' suffix notation indicates this is a barium star, which means that the stellar atmosphere has been enhanced by s-process elements most likely provided by what is now an orbiting white dwarf companion. The giant component has 38 ± 2 times the radius of the Sun. It is radiating 1,626 times the Sun's luminosity from its enlarged photosphere at an effective temperature of about 3,917 K.

Nu2 Boötis

Nu2 Boötis is a white-hued binary star system in the northern constellation of Boötes. It is faintly visible to the naked eye with a combined apparent visual magnitude of 5.02. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 7.59 mas as seen from the Earth, it is located roughly 430 light years from the Sun. The system is moving closer to the Sun with a radial velocity of −16.6 km/s.This stellar pair have a nearly circular orbit with a period of nine years and a semimajor axis of 0.0615 arc seconds. They are both of visual magnitude 5.80 and display a similar spectrum, with the primary, component A, being an A-type main sequence star with a stellar classification of A5 V. This has been identified as an A-type shell star, suggesting there is a circumstellar disk of gas orbiting one or both stars.

Omega Boötis

Omega Boötis (ω Boötis) is the Bayer designation for a solitary, orange-hued star in the northern constellation of Boötes. It is a dim star but visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +4.82. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 8.78 mas as seen from the Earth, it is located about 370 light years from the Sun.

This star is three billion years old with a stellar classification of K4 III, matching an evolved K-type giant star that has consume the supply of hydrogen at its core. The measured angular diameter is 3.04±0.19 mas. At the estimated distance of Omega Boötis, this yields a physical size of about 37 times the radius of the Sun. It has an estimated 1.65 times the mass of the Sun and is radiating 324 times the Sun's luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of about 3,962 K.

Omicron Boötis

Omicron Boötis (ο Boötis) is a yellow-hued star in the northern constellation of Boötes. With an apparent visual magnitude of +4.60, it is a fifth magnitude star that is visible to the naked eye. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 13.42 mas as seen from the Earth, it is located about 243 light years from the Sun. The star is moving closer to the Sun with a radial velocity of −9 km/s.At the age of 2.72 billion years, this is an evolved G-type giant star with a stellar classification of G8.5 III. It belongs to the so-called "red clump", which indicates it is generating energy through helium fusion at its core. Although it displays a higher abundance of barium than is normal for a star of its type, Williams (1975) considers its status as a Barium star to be "very doubtful". The star has double the mass of the Sun and has expanded to 11 times the Sun's radius. It is radiating 85 times the Sun's luminosity from its enlarged photosphere at an effective temperature of 4,864 K.

Phi Boötis

Phi Boötis (φ Boötis) is a single, yellow-hued star in the northern constellation of Boötes. It is dimly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +5.24. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 19.22 mas as seen from the Earth, it is located 170 light years from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude is diminished by an extinction of 0.09 due to interstellar dust. It is moving closer to the Sun with a radial velocity of −10.6 km/s.The stellar classification of Phi Boötis is G7 III-IV Fe-2, which would suggest it is an evolving G-type star that shows spectral traits of both a subgiant and a giant star. However, Alves (2000) has it listed as a member of the so-called "red clump", indicating that it is an aging giant star that is generating energy through helium fusion at its core. The 'Fe-2' suffix notation in its class means that it displays a significant underabundance of iron in its spectrum. Around three billion years old, Phi Boötis has an estimated 1.43 times the mass of the Sun and 5 times the Sun's radius. It is radiating 17 times the Sun's luminosity from its photosphere at an effective temperature of about 4,945 K.

Pi Boötis

Pi Boötis, Latinized from π Boötis, is a probable triple star system in the northern constellation of Boötes. It is visible to the naked eye with a combined apparent visual magnitude of 4.50. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 10.67 mas as seen from Earth, it is located roughly 310 light years from the Sun.

The brighter primary, component π1 Boötis, has a visual magnitude of 4.89 and a stellar classification of B9 IIIp (MnHgSi), which suggests it is an evolved blue-white hued B-type giant star. It is a chemically peculiar star of the HgMn type, with a spectrum that displays anomalous overabundances of mercury, manganese, and silicon. This component is most likely a single-lined spectroscopic binary with an unknown companion. Its magnitude 5.76 visible companion, π2 Boötis, is a white-hued A-type main-sequence star with a class of A6 V. As of 2010, the pair were separated by 5.537±0.003 arcseconds on the sky along a position angle of 110.5°±0.5°. This corresponds to a projected separation of 538.6±47.7 AU. The odds that is a mere chance alignment is 0.85%.Pi Boötis has the Chinese traditional star name 左攝提二 (Zuǒ shè tí èr)

Psi Boötis

Psi Boötis (ψ Boötis) is a single, orange-hued star in the northern constellation of Boötes. It is a dim star that is visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of +4.55. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 13.26 mas as seen from the Earth, it is located abou 246 light years from the Sun. At that distance, the visual magnitude is diminished by an extinction of 0.09 due to interstellar dust. It is traversing the sky with a net proper motion of 0.176 arc seconds per year, and has a radial velocity toward the Sun of −25.72 km/s.This star has a stellar classification of K2 III, matching an evolved K-type giant star. It belongs to the so-called "red clump", indicating that it is generating energy through helium fusion at its core. This star is about four billion years old and is spinning with a projected rotational velocity of 3.5 km/s. It has an estimated 1.38 times the mass of the Sun and has expanded to 20 times the Sun's radius. Psi Boötis radiating 135 times the Sun's luminosity from its enlarged photosphere at an effective temperature of 4,302 km/s.

Upsilon Boötis

Upsilon Boötis (υ Boötis) is a single, orange-hued star in the northern constellation of Boötes. It is a fourth magnitude star that is visible to the naked eye. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 12.38 mas as seen from the Earth, it is located about 263 light years from the Sun. The star is moving closer to the Sun with a radial velocity of −6 km/s.This is an evolved K-type giant star with a stellar classification of K5.5 III. Astroseismology was used to obtain a mass estimate of 1.11 times the mass of the Sun, while interferometric measurements give a size of about 38 times the Sun's radius. It is radiating about 332 times the Sun's luminosity from its enlarged photosphere at an effective temperature of 3,920 K.

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