39th Academy Awards

The 39th Academy Awards, honoring the best in film for 1966, were held on April 10, 1967, at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium in Santa Monica, California. They were hosted by Bob Hope.

Only two of the Best Picture nominees were nominated for Best Director: A Man for All Seasons and Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Both were adaptations of stage dramas.

39th Academy Awards
39th Academy Awards
DateApril 10, 1967
SiteSanta Monica Civic Auditorium, Santa Monica, California
Hosted byBob Hope
Produced byJoe Pasternak
Directed byRichard Dunlap
Highlights
Best PictureA Man for All Seasons
Most awardsA Man for All Seasons (6)
Most nominationsWho's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (13)
TV in the United States
NetworkABC
Duration2 hours, 31 minutes

Winners and nominees

Winners are listed first, highlighted in boldface and indicated with a double dagger (double-dagger).[1][2]

Best Picture Best Director
Best Actor Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor Best Supporting Actress
Best Story and Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen Best Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium
Best Foreign Language Film Best Song
Best Documentary Feature Best Documentary Short Subject
Best Short Subject, Live Action Best Short Subject, Cartoons
Best Original Music Score Best Scoring of Music – Adaptation or Treatment
Best Sound Effects Best Sound
Best Art Direction, Black-and-White Best Art Direction, Color
Best Cinematography, Black-and-White Best Cinematography, Color
Best Costume Design, Black-and-White Best Costume Design, Color
Best Film Editing Best Special Visual Effects

Honorary Awards

  • Yakima Canutt "for achievements as a stunt man and for developing safety devices to protect stunt men everywhere."
  • Y. Frank Freeman "for unusual and outstanding service to the Academy during his thirty years in Hollywood."

Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award

  • George Bagnall

Multiple nominations and awards

These films had multiple nominations:

The following films received multiple awards.

Trivia

  • The Academy Awards broadcast was almost canceled because of a strike involving the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA), the theatrical performers union governing live telecasts. However, the dispute was settled three hours before the ceremony was scheduled to begin. Bob Hope's opening monologue makes many references to this, and he claims that as late as 30 minutes before broadcast it was uncertain whether the telecast would go on.[3]
  • Vanessa Redgrave and Lynn Redgrave were both nominated for Best Actress. This was the first time in 25 years that two sisters were nominated in that category (Olivia de Havilland and Joan Fontaine were nominated for Best Actress in 1941).
  • This was the only time in the history of the Academy Awards that all Best Actress nominees were born outside of the United States.
  • Patricia Neal, making her first Hollywood appearance since a near-fatal stroke of two years before, received a standing ovation from the audience.
  • California's governor, Ronald Reagan, was among the guests in the audience. He was a longtime Academy member and supporter.
  • Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf's 13 nominations constitute the first and, as of 2012, only instance of a film being nominated in every category for which it was eligible. It is also the first instance of a film receiving an acting nomination for every credited cast member.
  • Mitzi Gaynor's performance of the song "Georgy Girl" is often cited as being one of the most heralded performances on an Oscar broadcast.

Presenters and performers

The following individuals, listed in order of appearance, presented awards or performed musical numbers.

Presenters

Name Role
Hank Simms Announcer of the 39th Academy Awards
Arthur Freed (AMPAS President) Gave opening remarks welcoming guests to the awards ceremony
Dean Jones
Raquel Welch
Presenters of the award for Best Sound
Shelley Winters Presenter of the award for Best Supporting Actor
Ann-Margret
Omar Sharif
Presenters of the awards for Best Cinematography
Irene Dunne Presenter of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award
Olivia de Havilland Presenter of the Short Subjects Awards
Diahann Carroll Presenter of the award for Best Sound Effects
Richard Harris
Barbara Rush
Presenters of the Documentary Awards
Fred MacMurray Presenter of the award for Best Special Visual Effects
Candice Bergen
Robert Mitchum
Presenters of the awards for Best Costume Design
Sidney Poitier Presenter of the award for Best Supporting Actress
Jack Valenti Presenter of the Honorary Award to Y. Frank Freeman
Lee Remick
James Stewart
Presenters of the award for Best Film Editing
Charlton Heston Presenter of the Honorary Award to Yakima Canutt
Patricia Neal Presenter of the award for Best Foreign Language Film
Rock Hudson
Vanessa Redgrave
Presenters of the awards for Best Art Direction
Fred Astaire
Ginger Rogers
Presenters of the Writing Awards
Arthur Freed Presenter of the Irving J. Thalberg Memorial Award to Robert Wise
Mary Tyler Moore
Dick Van Dyke
Presenters of the Music Awards
Dean Martin Presenter of the award for Best Song
Lee Marvin Presenter of the award for Best Actress
Rosalind Russell Presenter of the award for Best Director
Julie Christie Presenter of the award for Best Actor
Audrey Hepburn Presenter of the award for Best Picture

Performers

Name Role Performed
Johnny Green Musical arranger and conductor Orchestral
Dionne Warwick Performer "Alfie" from Alfie
Roger Williams
The Young Americans
Performers "Born Free" from Born Free
Mitzi Gaynor Performer "Georgy Girl" from Georgy Girl
John Davidson Performer "A Time For Love" from An American Dream
Jackie DeShannon Performer "My Wishing Doll" from Hawaii

See also

References

  1. ^ "The 39th Academy Awards (1967) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Archived from the original on 2014-11-10. Retrieved 2011-09-04.
  2. ^ "The Official Academy Awards® Database". Archived from the original on 2014-06-09. Retrieved 2011-10-04.
  3. ^ The Opening of the Academy Awards in 1967 Archived 2016-04-02 at the Wayback Machine, posted to YouTube by The Oscars (official channel)

External links

1967 in animation

Events in 1967 in animation.

A Man for All Seasons (1966 film)

A Man for All Seasons is a 1966 British biographical drama film in Technicolor based on Robert Bolt's play of the same name and adapted for the big screen by Bolt himself. It was released on 12 December 1966. It was directed by Fred Zinnemann, who had previously directed the films High Noon and From Here to Eternity.

The film and play both depict the final years of Sir Thomas More, the 16th-century Lord Chancellor of England who refused to sign a letter asking Pope Clement VII to annul King Henry VIII of England's marriage to Catherine of Aragon and refused to take an Oath of Supremacy declaring Henry VIII Supreme Head of the Church of England. Paul Scofield, who had played More in the West End stage premiere, also took the role in the film, starring alongside Wendy Hiller, Robert Shaw, Orson Welles and Susannah York. Also appearing are Nigel Davenport, Leo McKern, Corin Redgrave and, in one of his earliest screen roles, John Hurt.

A Man for All Seasons was a critical and box office success. It won the Academy Award for Best Picture at the 39th Academy Awards, while the cast and crew won another five, including Best Director for Zinnemann and Best Actor for Scofield. It also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture - Drama and the BAFTA Awards for Best Film and Best British Film.

Amrapali (film)

Amrapali is a 1966 historical Hindi film directed by Lekh Tandon, starring Vyjayanthimala and Sunil Dutt as leads. Music of the film was by Shankar-Jaikishan. The rights to this film are owned by Shah Rukh Khan's Red Chillies Entertainment.

It was based on the life of Amrapali (Ambapali), the nagarvadhu (royal courtesan) of Vaishali in present-day Bihar, the capital of the Licchavi republic in ancient India around 500 BC and Ajatashatru, the Haryanka dynasty king of the Magadha empire, who falls in love with her. Though he destroys Vaishali to get her, she in the meantime has been transformed by her encounter with Gautama Buddha, of whom she becomes a disciple and an Arahant herself. Her story finds mention in old Pali texts and Buddhist traditions.The film was selected as the Indian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 39th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee. Though the film wasn't a commercial success, in time it started being seen as classic and is remembered not just for its dramatic cinematography of war scenes by Dwarka Divecha, and Bhanu Athaiya's costumes for which she travelled to the Ajanta Caves, to seek references in Buddhist frescoes of the era, to create period costumes that subsequently became a template for costumes of that era, but also for the strong Anti-war sentiment the film reveals in the end.

Art Cruickshank

Art Cruickshank (December 17, 1918 – May 22, 1983) was an American special effects artist who worked at both Disney and 20th Century Fox. Before he was in special effects he was a cameraman at Disney.

Black Wind (film)

Black Wind (Spanish: Viento negro) is a 1964 Mexican drama film directed by Servando González. It was screened at the San Francisco Film Festival and the Melbourne International Film Festival. The film was selected as the Mexican entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 39th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Cairo 30

Cairo 30 (Arabic: القاهرة 30‎, translit. Al-Qāhira 30) is a 1966 Egyptian drama film directed by Salāḥ Abu Seif, and based on Nagiub Mahfouz's 1945 novel Modern Cairo. The film was selected as the Egyptian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 39th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominée.

Come Drink with Me

Come Drink with Me is a 1966 Hong Kong wuxia film directed by King Hu. Set during the Ming Dynasty, it stars Cheng Pei-pei and Yueh Hua as warriors with Chan Hung-lit as the villain, and features action choreography by Han Ying-chieh. It is widely considered one of the best Hong Kong films ever made. The film was selected as the Hong Kong entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 39th Academy Awards, but was not nominated.

Gordon Daniel

Gordon Adams Daniel (5 April 1923 – 21 August 2009) was an English sound editor, with 51 different films from 1955 to 1988. He won the Academy Award for the film Grand Prix for Best Sound Editing at the 39th Academy Awards.

J. Terry Williams

J. Terry Williams (August 25, 1930 – March 22, 2015) was an American film editor credited on about thirty feature films and television movies. He was nominated at the 39th Academy Awards for Best Film Editing for the film The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming (1966). His nomination was shared with Hal Ashby.He mainly worked on TV movies, as well as a couple of episodes of the TV show McMillan & Wife. Williams died in 2015.

Joan Bridge

Joan Bridge (13 March 1912 – 8 December 2009) was a British costume designer from Ripley in Derbyshire. She won at the 39th Academy Awards in the category of Best Costume design-Color for her work on A Man for All Seasons, which she shared with Elizabeth Haffenden. In addition she won the BAFTA as well. She worked on over 100 films during her long career.On retirement she moved to Totteridge and became a member of South Herts Golf Club where she played into her 90s.

Her funeral was held at Golders Green on 14 December 2009.

Jocelyn Rickards

Jocelyn Rickards (29 July 1924 – 7 July 2005) was an Australian artist and costume designer.

During the 1940s to 1950s Rickards was one of the Merioola Group of artists. The review of her works in a 1948 exhibition by Paul Haefliger was the source of the coined phrase "The Charm School" to describe these Sydney artists.In 1966 Rickards won a BAFTA Film Award for the film Mademoiselle.

In 1967 she was nominated at the 39th Academy Awards in the category of Best Costumes-Black and White for her work on the film Morgan – A Suitable Case for Treatment.

Kenneth Higgins

Kenneth Higgins (26 December 1919 - 22 January 2008) was a British cinematographer who worked on both television and film.

He was nominated at the 39th Academy Awards for Best Cinematography-Black and White for his work on the film Georgy Girl.

Lake of Tears (film)

Lake of Tears (湖の琴, Umi no Koto) is a 1966 Japanese film directed by Tomotaka Tasaka. It was Japan's submission to the 39th Academy Awards for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was not accepted as a nominee.

List of submissions to the 39th Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film

The following 19 films, all from different countries, were submitted for the 39th Academy Awards in the category Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The titles highlighted in blue and yellow were the five nominated films, which came from Czechoslovakia, France, Italy, Poland and Yugoslavia. The eventual winner was romantic drama A Man and a Woman, which represented France. The film also won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay.Romania submitted a film to the competition for the first time.

Queen of Clubs (film)

Queen of Clubs (Greek: Ντάμα σπαθί, translit. Dama spathi) is a 1966 Greek drama film directed by George Skalenakis. The film was selected as the Greek entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 39th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Rice (film)

Rice (Korean: 쌀, translit. Ssal) is a 1963 South Korean drama film directed by Shin Sang-ok. The film was selected as the South Korean entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 39th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

The Drag (film)

The Drag is a 1966 Canada anti-smoking animated short, animated and directed by Carlos Marchiori and produced by Robert Verrall and Wolf Koenig for the National Film Board of Canada. Aimed at young people, the 8 min. 37 sec. was a sponsored film for the former Department of National Health and Welfare. The film offered a comical look at dangers of addiction and the difficulties of quitting through the story of a chain smoker, recounting his experiences on a psychiatrist's couch, and also explores the part that cigarette advertising—once quite common—played in getting people hooked. Though dated for young viewers today, it was well received at the time with several awards as well as a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film at the 39th Academy Awards.

The Flying Matchmaker

The Flying Matchmaker (also: Two Kuni Lemel, Shnei Kuni Leml or שני קוני למל) is a 1966 Israeli film musical directed by Israel Becker. The story is based on the 1880 Yiddish play Di tsvey Kuni-lemels by Abraham Goldfaden. The film was the first major success on screen for lead actor Mike Burstyn who has a double role as Kuni Leml and his cousin Max, and also casts his father Pesach Burstein in a small role. The film was selected as the Israeli entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 39th Academy Awards, but was not accepted as a nominee.

Three (1965 film)

Three (Serbo-Croatian: Tri) is a 1965 Yugoslav film directed by Aleksandar Petrović. It was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film at the 39th Academy Awards.

Awards of Merit
Special awards
Former awards
Ceremonies

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