35th Armor Regiment

The 35th Armor Regiment is a Regiment of the United States Army first established in 1941. The lineage of the regiment is carried on by the 1st Battalion 35th Armored Regiment, currently attached to the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division.

35th Armor Regiment
35thArmorReg
Coat of Arms
Active1941
CountryUSA
BranchArmor Branch (United States)
TypeArmor
Motto(s)VINCERE VEL MORI (To Conquer Or Die)
Branch colorYellow
Insignia
Distinctive Unit Insignia
1-35 Armor

Distinctive Unit Insignia

  • Description

A Silver color and metal enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall blazoned as follows: Vert, an armadillo passant Argent, langued Gules. Attached above from a wreath Argent and Vert, a fleur-de-lis Gules in front of palm branch of the first. Attached below a tripartite Silver scroll inscribed “VINCERE” “VEL” “MORI” in Green letters.

  • Symbolism

The shield is green, the color of the Armored Force. The armadillo, being characterized by the qualities of invulnerability, ferociousness, protection, and cunning endurance, alludes to the elements which are vital if the organization is to pursue successfully its duties. The palm is for military victory. The fleur-de-lis commemorates World War II service in France. The color red symbolizes courage. The motto translates to “To Conquer or Die.”

  • Background

The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 35th Armored Regiment on 1 June 1942. It was redesignated for the 35th Tank Battalion on 12 November 1943. The insignia was redesignated for the 35th Constabulary Squadron on 29 November 1946. It was redesignated for the 35th Tank Battalion and amended by the addition of a crest on 20 August 1956. It was amended to change the description on 14 March 1957. The insignia was redesignated for the 35th Armor Regiment on 22 September 1958.

Coat Of Arms

Blazon

  • Shield

Vert, an armadillo passant Argent, langued Gules.

  • Crest

From a wreath Argent and Vert, a fleur-de-lis Gules in front of a palm branch of the first. Motto VINCERE VEL MORI (To Conquer Or Die).

    • Symbolism
  • Shield

The shield is green, the color of the Armored Force. The armadillo, being characterized by the qualities of invulnerability, ferociousness, protection, and cunning endurance, alludes to the elements which are vital if the organization is to pursue successfully its duties.

  • Crest

The palm is for military victory. The fleur-de-lis commemorates World War II service in France.

  • Background

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 35th Armored Regiment on 30 May 1942. It was redesignated for the 35th Tank Battalion on 12 November 1943. The insignia was redesignated for the 35th Constabulary Squadron on 26 November 1946. It was redesignated for the 35th Tank Battalion and amended by the addition of a crest on 20 August 1956. It was amended to change the blazon on 14 March 1957. The insignia was redesignated for the 35th Armor Regiment on 22 September 1958.

Current configuration

  • 1st Battalion 35th Armored Regiment (United States)[1]
  • 2nd Battalion 35th Armored Regiment (United States)
  • 3rd Battalion 35th Armored Regiment (United States)
  • 4th Battalion 35th Armored Regiment (United States)

See also

References

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Institute of Heraldry document "35th Armor Regiment".

  • Historical register and dictionary of the United States Army, from ..., Volume 1 By Francis Bernard Heitman [2]
  • Encyclopedia of United States Army insignia and uniforms By William K. Emerson (page 51).[3]

External links

4th Armored Division (United States)

The 4th Armored Division of the United States Army was an Armored Division that earned distinction while spearheading General Patton's Third Army in the European theater of World War II.

The 4th Armored Division, unlike most other U.S. armored divisions during World War II, didn't officially adopt a nickname for the division during the war. However, their unofficial nickname "Name Enough" came into use postwar; the division commander having said, "Fourth Armored Division was name enough"; "They shall be known by their deeds alone." The 4th was named the "Breakthrough" division in 1954, but that name was eventually discontinued.

Armor Branch

The Armor Branch of the United States Army is an active combat arms branch.

It was created provisionally in 1940 as Armored Force under Chief of the Armored Force, Brigadier General Adna R. Chaffee, Jr. and took control of all tank units in infantry and cavalry units.

Brigade Modernization Command

The U.S. Army Joint Modernization Command, or JMC, was formerly the Brigade Modernization Command (BMC). The BMC was previously the Future Force Integration Directorate (FFID). It is subordinate to The U.S. Army's Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) and is part of the Army Capabilities Integration Center (ARCIC). The change reflects the Army’s commitment to its Incremental Brigade Modernization strategy and its effort to make BMC and the 2nd Brigade, 1st Armored Division the centerpiece of integrated network evaluations at Fort Bliss and White Sands Missile Range.

JMC conducts the integration and evaluations of the Army's network, capability packages and other capabilities to provide Doctrine, Organization, Training, Materiel, Leadership and Education, Personnel and Facilities recommendations to the Army. JMC gets capability solutions into the hands of soldiers faster than traditional channels by utilizing support from combat, training, and material developers and engineers early on in the development lifecycle.

JMC's commanding general is Brig. Gen. Johnny K. Davis, who took command on June 14, 2018, succeeding BG Joel K. Tyler. Davis was formerly 80th commander of 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard); Tyler assumed command of U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command.

List of United States Armed Forces unit mottoes

Many units of the United States Armed Forces have distinctive mottoes. Such mottoes are used in order to "reflect and reinforce" each unit's values and traditions. Mottoes are used by both military branches and smaller units. While some mottoes are official, others are unofficial. Some mottoes appear on unit patches, such as the U.S. Army's distinctive unit insignia.The use of mottoes is old as the U.S. military itself. A general order issued by George Washington on February 20, 1776, when he was commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, directed that "it is necessary that every Regiment should be furnished with Colours" and the "Number of the Regiment is to be mark'd on the Colours, and such a Motto, as the Colonel may choose, in fixing upon which, the General advises a Consultation amongst them."

Order of battle of the Gulf War ground campaign

This is the order of battle for the ground campaign in the Gulf War between Coalition Forces and Iraqi Forces between 24–28 February 1991. The order that they are listed in are from west to east. Iraqi units that were not in the Kuwaiti Theater of Operations are excluded from this list. Some Iraqi divisions remained un-identified by American intelligence and a number of the details of the Iraqi order of battle are in dispute among various authoritative sources.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.