35th Annual Grammy Awards

The 35th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 24, 1993 and recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year.[3] The nominations were announced on January 7, 1993.[4] The evening's host was the American stand-up comedian Garry Shandling, who hosted the ceremony for the third time.[5] The CBS network broadcast the show live from the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, California.[6]

This particular Grammy live broadcast was the commercially most successful of its kind in the 1990s.[7] As Nielsen Media Research and Billboard magazine stated on January 10, 2004, "the highest-rated Grammy show of the 1990s was the 1993 telecast, which got a 19.9 rating/31 share and 30 million United States viewers" alone.[1] British guitarist and singer Eric Clapton was the night's big winner, winning six awards out of nine nominations including Album, Song and Record of the Year.[8]

Michael Jackson, having been recently interviewed in Oprah Winfrey Show had received the Grammy Legend Award from his sister Janet Jackson, for whom she won Best R&B song for her single That's the Way Loves Go. A small segment of the show was "How to Become a Legend" narrated by Janet.[9]

A total of twelve live performances where held at the ceremony, including the opener "Steam" by Peter Gabriel, "Constant Craving" by k. d. lang, "Give It Away" by the Red Hot Chili Peppers with George Clinton and P-Funk, "Save the Best for Last" by Vanessa Williams, "My Lovin' (You're Never Gonna Get It)" by En Vogue, "The Lady Is a Tramp" by Tony Bennett and Natalie Cole, "The Whiskey Ain't Workin'" by Travis Tritt and Marty Stuart, "People Everyday" by Arrested Development, "Achy Breaky Heart" by Billy Ray Cyrus, "Hallelujah!" by Mervyn Warren and Los Angeles Master Chorale, "Beauty and the Beast" by Celine Dion and Peabo Bryson as well as "Cherokee" by Arturo Sandoval featuring the GRP All-Stars Ensemble and Clapton's "Tears in Heaven".[10]

At the 45th Primetime Emmy Awards in 1993, the production mixers Ed Greene, Rick Himot, Don Worsham, David Hewitt and Paul Sandweiss were nominated for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Sound Mixing for a Variety or Music Series or a Special, losing to Star Trek: The Next Generation.[11]

35th Annual Grammy Awards
Grammy logo 1993 035
Official poster
DateFebruary 24, 1993
LocationShrine Auditorium
Hosted byGarry Shandling
Highlights
Most awardsEric Clapton (6)
Most nominationsEric Clapton (9)
Record YR."Tears in Heaven"
Album YR.Unplugged
Song YR."Tears in Heaven"
New ArtistArrested Development
Person YR.Natalie Cole
Websitewww.grammy.com
Television/radio coverage
NetworkCBS
Runtimecirca 150 minutes
Viewership30.0 million viewers[1]
Produced byMatt Sager · Tzvi Small[2]

Award winners

Alternative

Blues

Children's

Classical

Comedy

Composing and arranging

Country

Folk

Gospel

Historical

Jazz

Latin

Musical show

Music video

New Age

Packaging and notes

Polka

Pop

Production and engineering

R&B

Rap

Reggae

Rock

Spoken

Traditional pop

World

Special merit awards

MusiCares Person of the Year

References

  1. ^ a b Hay, Carla (January 10, 2004). "Grammy Ratings Share" (PDF). Billboard Magazine. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 116 (2): 13. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  2. ^ "35th Annual Grammy Awards Production Credits". The Recording Academy. Direct Upload. Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  3. ^ "35th Annual GRAMMY Awards | GRAMMY.com". Grammy Awards. The Recording Academy. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  4. ^ "1993 Grammy Nominations". The Baltimore Sun. Light For All, LLC. January 8, 1993. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  5. ^ Stedman, Alex (March 24, 2016). "Garry Shandling Dies at 66". Variety.com. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  6. ^ "1993 Grammy Winners". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. February 26, 1993. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  7. ^ "GRAMMY Rewind: 35th Annual GRAMMY Awards". The Grammys. The Recording Academy. 26 January 2012. Retrieved 23 April 2017.
  8. ^ "Clapton awarded 6 Grammys including best song, album". The Milwaukee Sentinel. Google News. February 25, 1993. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  9. ^ "Lifetime Achievement Award | GRAMMY.com". Grammy Awards. The Recording Academy. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  10. ^ Todd Everett (February 24, 1993). "35th Annual Grammy Awards". Variety. Penske Business Media, LLC. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  11. ^ "Nominees/Winners". The Television Academy. The Emmys. Retrieved 23 April 2017.

External links

1993 in Latin music

This is a list of notable events in Latin music (i.e. Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking music from Latin America, Europe, and the United States) that took place in 1993.

Agua Nueva

Agua Nueva (English: New water) is the debut album by Mexican pop singer, Cristian Castro, It was released on June 30, 1992. It was nominated for Grammy Award for Best Latin Pop Album in 1993.Following Fonovisa's purchase by the Universal Music Group, the album was re-released in 1998 with a different track listing.

Bobby (Bobby Brown album)

Bobby is the third studio album by American R&B singer Bobby Brown, released in 1992 by MCA Records.

The album continued the R&B/new-jack sound of its successful predecessor, Don't Be Cruel. Babyface, L.A. Reid, and Daryl Simmons returned as songwriters and producers, however Brown also worked with new producers, most notably Teddy Riley, who was considered a pioneer of the new jack swing genre. Riley also co-wrote and produced the majority of the album. Brown also had more creative input and control of the album, becoming an executive producer and co-writing seven of the album's thirteen tracks.

Bobby peaked at #2 on the US Billboard 200 album chart, and spawned two Top 10 Billboard Hot 100 singles: "Humpin' Around" (#3) and "Good Enough" (#7). The album also peaked at #1 on the Billboard R&B Albums chart and reached #2 in Australia.

The album included Brown's first duet with wife Whitney Houston on "Something in Common", which was also released as a single.

Bobby generally received positive reviews from music critics. Brown received his second Grammy nomination for Best Male R&B Vocal Performance at the 35th Annual Grammy Awards for "Humpin' Around".

The album has been certified 2x Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for shipments of over two million units in the United States.

Celine Dion (album)

Celine Dion is the eleventh studio album by Canadian singer Celine Dion, and her second English-language album. It was originally released by Columbia Records on 30 March 1992, and features the Grammy and Academy Award-winning song "Beauty and the Beast", and other hits like "If You Asked Me To" and "Love Can Move Mountains". The album reached number one in Quebec, number three in Canada and was certified Diamond by the Canadian Recording Industry Association, denoting shipments of over one million copies in this country. At the 35th Annual Grammy Awards, Celine Dion was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Female Pop Vocal Performance. The album has sold over five million copies worldwide.

Chris LeDoux

Chris LeDoux (October 2, 1948 – March 9, 2005) was an American country music singer-songwriter, bronze sculptor, and hall of fame rodeo champion. During his career LeDoux recorded 36 albums (many self-released) which have sold more than six million units in the United States as of January 2007. He was awarded two gold and one platinum album certifications from the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), was nominated for a Grammy Award, and was honored with the Academy of Country Music Music Cliffie Stone Pioneer Award. LeDoux is also the only person ever to both participate and perform at the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo.

D. L. Menard

Doris Leon "D. L." Menard (April 14, 1932 – July 27, 2017) was an American songwriter, performer, and recording artist in contemporary Cajun music. He was called the "Cajun Hank Williams".

Doo-Bop

Doo-Bop is the last studio album by American jazz trumpeter Miles Davis. It was recorded with hip hop producer Easy Mo Bee and released posthumously on June 30, 1992, by Warner Bros. Records. The album was received unfavorably by most critics, although it won a Grammy Award for Best R&B Instrumental Performance the following year.

Grammy Award for Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella

The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement (and its subsequent name changes) has been awarded since 1963. The award is presented to the arranger(s) of the music. Only songs or tracks are eligible, no longer works (e.g. albums). The performing artist does not receive a Grammy, except if he/she is also the arranger.

There have been several minor changes to the name of the award:

From 1963 to 1981 the award was known as Best Instrumental Arrangement

From 1982 to 1983 it was awarded as Best Arrangement on an Instrumental Recording

From 1984 to 1994 it was awarded as Best Arrangement on an Instrumental

From 1995 to 2014 it was again awarded as Best Instrumental Arrangement

From 2015 it has been awarded as Best Arrangement, Instrumental Or A Cappella, which also includes vocal arrangements for a cappella performances.Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year.

Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition

The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition (including its previous names) has been awarded since 1960. The award is presented to the composer of an original piece of music (not an adaptation), first released during the eligibility year. In theory, any style of music is eligible for this category, but winning compositions are usually in the jazz or film score genres.

The Grammy is awarded to the composer(s) of the music, not to the performing artist, except if the artist is also the composer. There have been several minor changes to the name of the award:

In 1958 it was awarded as Best Musical Composition First Recorded and Released in 1958 (over 5 minutes duration)

In 1960 it was awarded as Best Musical Composition First Recorded and Released in 1959 (more than 5 minutes duration)

In 1962 it was awarded as Best Instrumental Theme or Instrumental Version of Song

From 1963 to 1964 and from 1967 to 1970 it was awarded as Best Instrumental Theme

In 1965 it was awarded as Best Instrumental Composition (other than jazz)

From 1971 to the present it has been awarded as Best Instrumental CompositionYears reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year.

Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group

The Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group was awarded between 1991 and 2011, alongside the Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance. Previously a single award was presented for Best Rap Performance.

The award was discontinued in 2012. All solo and duo/group rap performances have since been shifted to the revived Best Rap Performance category.

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for music released from October a year and a half prior to September the previous year. And O T Kennix win many

Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance

The Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance was awarded from 1991 to 2011, alongside the Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group. Previously, a single award was presented for Best Rap Performance.

In 2003, this award was split into separate awards for Best Female Rap Solo Performance and Best Male Rap Solo Performance. In 2005, it was again presented as a single award.

As of 2012, The award was permanently discontinued due to a major overhaul of Grammy categories. Since 2012, all solo and duo/group rap performances has been shifted to the revived Best Rap Performance category.

Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released from October a year and a half prior to September the previous year.

Here's to Life

Here's to Life is a 1992 studio album by Shirley Horn, arranged by Johnny Mandel (also the composer of three of the songs on the album), who received a Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement Accompanying Vocal(s) on this album.

The title track "Here's to Life" became Horn's signature song. The music was written by Artie Butler and the poignant lyrics were written by Phyllis Molinary. The lyric is known, world-wide, as one of her finest works and the song is considered a "modern day jazz standard."

"If You Love Me" is her interpretation of the passionate "Hymne à l'amour", made famous by Edith Piaf.

Summer is the first English version of the Italian standard "Estate". Horn ordered English lyrics after hearing Joao Gilberto's version, which spread the song's worldwide fame.

I Belong to You (Whitney Houston song)

"I Belong to You" is a song performed by American singer Whitney Houston from her third studio album I'm Your Baby Tonight (1990). It was written by Derek Bramble and Franne Golde, produced by Narada Michael Walden, and released on October 18, 1991 as the album's fifth single. "I Belong to You" was a Top 10 hit on the US Billboard R&B chart, and also charted in the UK and the Netherlands. The song garnered Houston a nomination for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance at the 35th Grammy Awards (1992).

Into the Void (Black Sabbath song)

"Into the Void" is a song by Black Sabbath, released in 1971 on their album, Master of Reality. An early version of "Into the Void" called "Spanish Sid" was released on the deluxe edition of Master of Reality. It is written in the key of C# minor.

Various artists have covered the song, including Soundgarden, Kyuss, Monster Magnet, Melvins, Sleep, Dr. Know, Cavity, Exhorder, Lumsk, Dimmi Argus and Orange Goblin.In Soundgarden's version, the original lyrics are replaced by words of protest by Chief Seattle, which fit the metre of the song. At the 35th Annual Grammy Awards, the appropriately renamed "Into the Void (Sealth)" received a nomination for Best Metal Performance.

It's Probably Me

"It's Probably Me" is a song that was originally released in 1992 as an all-star collaboration by Sting featuring Eric Clapton, Michael Kamen and David Sanborn.

List of Grammy Award ceremony locations

The Grammy Awards have been held in many prestigious locations. In 1971 the Grammy Awards had its first live telecast and therefore had its own sole venue each year for the telecast. From 1963 to 1970 the Academy aired a TV special annually called "The Best On Record" which highlighted the awards dinners. Since 2000, the Grammy Awards have been held in the Staples Center located in Downtown Los Angeles.

Rush (soundtrack)

Rush is the soundtrack album for the 1991 film of the same name. Written and performed by Eric Clapton, the soundtrack album includes the song "Tears in Heaven," which won three Grammy awards in 1993.In a review of the album, AllMusic Guide wrote: "This album has far more impact than you might expect from the score to a movie — there's a sense of the music here working something out in Clapton's heart, a sense given a lot of power thanks to the intense, heart-rending passion invoked by some of the turns taken here. At its best, Clapton's music can speak of the pain he feels — and Clapton has rarely been better than he is here."

Unplugged (Eric Clapton album)

Unplugged is a 1992 album by Eric Clapton, recorded at Bray Studios, England in front of an audience for the MTV Unplugged. It includes a version of the successful 1991 single "Tears in Heaven" and an acoustic version of "Layla". It won six Grammy awards at the 35th Annual Grammy Awards in 1993 and became the bestselling live album of all time and Clapton's bestselling album, selling 26 million copies worldwide.

Special awards
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