319th Field Artillery Regiment

The 319th Field Artillery Regiment, more commonly referred to as the 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment (319th AFAR), is a parent regiment in the U.S. Army Regimental System. Four battalions of the regiment are currently active. Three of these Battalions 1st Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment (1-319th AFAR), 2nd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment (2-319th AFAR), 3rd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment (3-319th AFAR) are in the 82nd Airborne Division and one Battalion 4th Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment (4-319th AFAR) is in the 173rd Airborne Brigade.

319th Field Artillery Regiment
319FARegtCOA
Coat of arms
Active1917–present
CountryUnited States
Branch United States Army
TypeUSA - Army Field Artillery Insignia.svgField artillery
RoleUSARS parent regiment
Sizeregiment
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia
319FARegtDUI
Unit beret flashes for the Regiment, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions
US Army 319th Field Artillery Regiment Flashes

Current Status of Regimental Elements

History

World War I

The regiment was 'constituted'[2] on 5 August 1917 as a National Army unit, the 319th Field Artillery Regiment, and assigned to the 157th Field Artillery Brigade of the 82d Division. It was first physically formed ('organized') on 2 September 1917 at Camp Gordon, near Chamblee, Georgia. As the division's general support battalion, the 319th was organized with three battalions, each composed of two batteries- the six batteries were lettered consecutively through the regiment, so 1st Battalion was composed of Batteries A and B, 2nd Battalion of Batteries C and D, and 3rd Battalion of Batteries E and F. Although supposed to be equipped with 6-in howitzers, the 319th's six firing batteries shared two batteries worth of 3-in guns with the rest of the 157th Field Artillery Brigade, supplementing with replicas "crudely made structures fashioned from the trunks of small trees, tin cans, spools, gas pipes and any available material."[3] During training, the regiment was designated and reorganized as a motorized regiment, but did not receive trucks until after the end of the fighting in 1918.[4]

On 10 May 1918, the regiment departed Camp Gordon, taking trains to Camp Mills, NY, where it arrived on 12 May 1918. On 18 May 1918, the regiment boarded the British passenger liner Lapland. Sailing on 19 May 1918, the regiment arrived in Liverpool, England, on 31 May 1918, took trains to Winchester and spent two days in the Winnal Downs Rest Camp before crossing to France. The regiment arrived at La Courtine, France, on 7 June 1918. At La Courtine, the regiment was issued 155mm howitzers and conducted two months of training, building to a 157th Field Artillery Brigade live fire in early August.[5]

On 15 August 1918, the 319th's 1st Battalion, under the command of Major Henry H. Denhardt, was attached to the 89th Division. On 20 August 1918, at 1510hrs, a gun from Battery A fired the 319th's first rounds at the front

It went overseas with the 82d Division and was present during the St. Mihiel offensive, the Meuse-Argonne, and the Lorraine advance of 1918. During the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, Major John Wallace, commanding 1st Battalion, 319th made the unit's first operational parachute jump when his observation balloon was shot down by a German plane. Returning to the United States, it was demobilized on 18 May 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey.

Reconstituted 24 June 1921 in the Organized Reserves as the 319th Field Artillery and assigned to the 82d Division. Organized in January, 1922 at Decatur, Georgia.

World War II

The regiment was reorganized and redesignated 13 February 1942 as the 319th Field Artillery Battalion. It was then ordered into active military service on 25 March 1942 and reorganized at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana. Reorganized and redesignated 15 August 1942 as the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion (GFAB). During World War II the battalion was present for the Invasion of Sicily, the Naples-Foggia operation, the Normandy landings, where it earned a Presidential Unit Citation at Ste Mere Eglise,[6] the invasion of the Rhineland (for which two operations it was granted an arrowhead distinction), and fighting in the Ardennes-Alsace region. It was also given general campaign credit for Central Europe.

The 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion saw its first combat action in Italy in September 1943 when it was chosen by Col. Darby of the U.S. Rangers to be his only artillery unit to support his Rangers in a seaborne invasion of the Naples coast designed to clear the way for the upcoming Allied invasion of Italy at Anzio. The 319th was the first U.S. airborne artillery unit to fire against and engage the enemy in WWII. Fighting alongside the Rangers and small detached units from the 82nd Airborne, it effectively repelled numerous German counterattacks and kept the roads to Naples through the Chiunzi Pass clear until the US and British forces could gain control of the Sorrento Plateau after fighting their way up the coast from Anzio.

The 319th gained distinction as the first Allied unit to enter Naples and formally liberate that city from the retreating German forces. After serving as a "military police" unit to clear rubble, provide aid, food and shelter to the civilian population and also help dispose of German time bombs and other armaments left behind, the 319th was relieved of its civilian police duties and sent to Northern Ireland where it rejoined the rest of the 82nd Airborne to begin training for the D-Day invasion of Normandy. For its conduct in this offensive, the 319th was awarded its first Presidential Unit Citation, making it the first battalion of the 82nd Airborne to win such an honor in WWII. (Note: some smaller-sized units of the 82nd also won the award because they were selected by Col Darby to be part of his Ranger force along with the 319th)

The 319th and its sister GFAB, the 320th, are the only two glider field artillery units to make two glider assaults behind enemy lines during the Second World War; at St. Mere Eglise on D-Day and at Nijmegen in the Netherlands. The 319th lost approximately 40% of its strength due to death, wounds and injuries sustained by glider crashes and enemy fire on the night of 5–6 June 1944 during the Normandy landings.

Because all of their howitzers were damaged by crash landings, the 319th fought as infantrymen for the first few days supporting the paratroop and glider infantry of the 82nd Airborne during the battles to control the Merderet bridgehead. The glider carrying the commander of the battalion, Col Todd, crash-landed behind German lines and he and the survivors had to fight their way back to the original landing zone to rejoin his men.

Once the battles in Normandy had subsided, the 319th was sent back to England to recoup and regroup along with the rest of the 82nd. A few weeks later, they were ordered to begin preparation for Operation Market Garden, a joint US and British assault on the south-eastern Netherlands to secure the Rhine bridges for a planned invasion of the German Rhineland. The 319th's glider landings in September 1944 took place in daylight (as opposed to the night landings during D-Day) and there were fewer casualties although several gliders did land across the border in Germany (most of these men did not survive). The 319th provided artillery support for the 508th and 504th Parachute Infantry Regiments (82nd) during this campaign and aided in the paratroopers' capture of the critical Nijmegen Bridge.

After almost two months of combat, the 319th was then sent to Northern France for R & R in mid-November 1944. However, less than a month later, they were quickly brought to the front near St. Vith (Belgium) to support the American infantry which sustained heavy losses following the German assault in the Ardennes (Battle of the Bulge). During this engagement, the 319th fought close combat action against several SS Panzer units, frequently with little infantry support (the 82nd lines were stretched over a wide area to the south of St. Vith as a holding action until more US troops could be brought to the battlefront to stem the tide of the advancing SS Panzers).

The 319th then fought with other 82nd units through the Huertgen Forest and across the Rhine into Germany and continued to fire high explosive shells against the enemy until April 1945 when they reached the Berlin region and encountered advancing Russian or Red Army troops. The 319th along with other units of the 82nd Airborne served as the U.S. military honor guard in Berlin after the German surrender in May 1945.

Cold War – present

On 15 December 1947, the 319th GFAB was reorganized and redesignated as the 319th Field Artillery Battalion. The 319th FAB was withdrawn from the Organized Reserve Corps and allotted to the Regular Army 15 November 1948, and again reorganized and redesignated 15 December 1948 as the 319th Airborne Field Artillery Battalion.

The 319th AFAB was relieved 1 September 1957 from assignment to the 82d Airborne Division; concurrently reorganized and redesignated as the 319th Artillery, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System. Under the pentomic organization from 1957 to 1963, elements of the regiment were active in the 82nd Airborne Division (Batteries A, B and C- Battery C until 1960), 101st Airborne Division (Batteries D and E), and with the 25th Infantry Division and United States Army Pacific (Battery C, from 1960–1963).[7][8]

Under the Reorganization of the Objective Army Division (ROAD) beginning in 1964, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 319th Artillery served with the 82nd Airborne Division; 2nd Battalion (Airborne), 319th Artillery served with the 101st Airborne Division and 3rd Battalion (Airborne), 319th Artillery served with the 173rd Airborne Brigade.

Post-Vietnam reductions saw inactivation of 2nd Battalion (Airborne), 319th Field Artillery and the reassignment of the 3rd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery from the 173rd Airborne Brigade to the 101st Airborne Division.

Reorganized under the U.S. Army Regimental System beginning in 1986, the 82nd Airborne Division Artillery, which at the time was composed of the three active battalions of the 319th Field Artillery, assumed the heritage of the 319th (although the Army continued to officially recognize the two organizations as separate entities). In 1988, Battery D, 319th Field Artillery was activated for service with the airborne battalion combat team, and later the 173rd Airborne Brigade.

Further Operational Service by Regimental Elements

Dominican Republic

In April 1965, 1-319 AFAR deployed with the 82nd Airborne Division's 3rd Brigade to the Dominican Republic during Operation Power Pack, and earned Armed Forces Expedition credit for the Dominican Republic.[9]

Vietnam

During the Vietnam War, 2-319 AFAR deployed with the 101st Airborne Division from November 1967 to December 1971 and 3-319 AFAR deployed with the 173rd Airborne Brigade from May 1965 to July 1971.[10]

Grenada

In 1983, the 1-319 AFAR took part in Operation Urgent Fury.

Panama

In December 1989, 3-319 AFAR along with fire support personnel from 1-319 AFAR and 2-319 AFAR participated in Operation Just Case, gaining Armed Forces Expedition credit with arrowhead for participating in the airborne assault.[11][12][13]

Gulf War

The 82nd Airborne Division Artillery, consisting of Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1-319 AFAR, 2-319 AFAR and 3-319 AFAR deployed to Saudi Arabia in August 1990 for Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, participating in the Defense of Saudi Arabia, the *Liberation and Defense of Kuwait and Cease-Fire campaigns.

Following the March 1991 cease fire, Battery D, 319 AFAR deployed with the 3d Battalion (Airborne), 325th Infantry to Turkey and northern Iraq for Operation Provide Comfort.[14]

Kosovo

Batteries from both 1-319 AFAR and 3-319 AFAR participated in peace-keeping operations in Kosovo in 1999.

Global War on Terror

Since the 9-11 terror attacks, 1-319 AFAR has deployed to Afghanistan once (Operation Enduring Freedom II) and to Iraq four times (Operation Iraqi Freedom I, 2006-2007, 2008-2009, and Operation Inherent Resolve 2015).

The 2-319 AFAR has deployed to Iraq three times, in addition to sending batteries on short notice deployments with infantry battalion task forces on several occasions.

The 3-319 AFAR has deployed to three times to Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom III, 2005-2006, and 2012) and twice to Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom 2007-2008 and 2009-2010), with fire support personnel making an additional deployment to Iraq with 1st Brigade, 2-504 PIR, 3-504 PIR and 2-505 PIR in 2004 for Operation Iraqi Freedom I.

Battery D, 319 AFAR participated in Operation Iraqi Freedom I and Operation Enduring Freedom VI.

The 4-319 AFAR has made three combat deployments to Afghanistan.

Disaster relief

In addition to deploying to the GWOT, elements of the 319th have deployed to disaster relief, both within the United States (1-319 AFAR to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina in 2005) and overseas (2-319 AFAR to Haiti in 2010)

Operation Atlantic Resolve

The 4-319 AFAR has been active in training with NATO forces in Poland, Romania, Latvia, Lithuania, and Estonia as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve.

Current Status of Regimental Elements

Since the inactivation of the 82nd Airborne Division Artillery in 2006, the separate battalions of the 319th Field Artillery have been assigned to their respective brigade combat teams. The 319th Field Artillery Regiment currently has four active components:

Lineage & honors

Lineage

  • Constituted 5 August 1917 in the National Army as the 319th Field Artillery and assigned to the 82d Division.
  • Organized 2 September 1917 at Camp Gordon, Georgia.
  • Demobilized 18 May 1919 at Camp Dix, New Jersey.
  • Reconstituted 24 June 1921 in the Organized Reserves as the 319th Field Artillery and assigned to the 82d Division (later redesignated as the 82d Airborne Division).
  • Organized in January 1922 at Decatur, Georgia.
  • Reorganized and redesignated 13 February 1942 as the 319th Field Artillery Battalion.
  • Ordered into active military service 25 March 1942 and reorganized at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana.
  • Reorganized and redesignated 15 August 1942 as the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion.
  • Reorganized and redesignated 15 December 1947 as the 319th Field Artillery Battalion. (Organized Reserves redesignated 25 March 1948 as the Organized Reserve Corps.)
  • Withdrawn 15 November 1948 from the Organized Reserve Corps and allotted to the Regular Army.
  • Reorganized and redesignated 15 December 1948 as the 319th Airborne Field Artillery Battalion.
  • Relieved 1 September 1957 from assignment to the 82d Airborne Division; concurrently, reorganized and redesignated as the 319th Artillery, a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System.
  • Redesignated 1 September 1971 as the 319th Field Artillery.
  • Withdrawn 2 October 1986 from the Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System.[15]

Campaign participation credit

  • World War I: St. Mihiel; Meuse‑Argonne; Lorraine 1918
  • World War II: Sicily; Naples‑Foggia; Normandy (with arrowhead); Rhineland (with arrowhead); Ardennes‑Alsace; Central Europe
  • Vietnam: Defense; Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase II; Counteroffensive, Phase III; Tet Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase IV; Counteroffensive, Phase V; Counteroffensive, Phase VI; Tet 69/Counteroffensive; Summer–Fall 1969; Winter–Spring 1970; Sanctuary Counteroffensive; Counteroffensive, Phase VII; Consolidation I; Consolidation II
  • Armed forces expeditions: Dominican Republic; Grenada; Panama (with arrowhead)
  • Southwest Asia: Defense of Saudi Arabia; Liberation and Defense of Kuwait; Cease-Fire[15]
  • War on Terror:
    • Afghanistan: Consolidation I, Consolidation II, Consolidation III, Transition I
    • Iraq: Liberation of Iraq, Transition of Iraq, National Resolution, Iraqi Surge, Iraqi Sovereignty, New Dawn[16]

Note: The published US Army lineage lists "Campaigns to be determined" as of 2007. Comparison of the deployment dates by regimental battalions with War on Terrorism campaigns shows that the 319th is entitled to the campaigns listed.

Decorations

  • U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Presidential Unit Citation ribbon.svg Presidential Unit Citation (Army), Streamer embroidered CHIUNZI PASS (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; WD GO 41, 1947)
  • U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Presidential Unit Citation ribbon.svg Presidential Unit Citation (Army), Streamer embroidered STE. MERE EGLISE (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; WD GO 83, 1944)
  • U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Presidential Unit Citation ribbon.svg Presidential Unit Citation (Army), Streamer embroidered DAK TO (3d Battalion, 319th Artillery, cited; DA GO 42, 1969)
  • U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Presidential Unit Citation ribbon.svg Presidential Unit Citation (Army), Streamer embroidered DONG AP BIA MOUNTAIN (2d Battalion, 319th Artillery, cited; DA GO 15, 1972)
  • Valorous Unit Award ribbon.svg Valorous Unit Award, Streamer embroidered DEFENSE OF SAIGON (2d Battalion, 319th Artillery, cited; DA GO 52, 1974)
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation ribbon.svg Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1965 1967 (3d Battalion, 319th Artillery, cited; DA GO 48, 1968)
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation ribbon.svg Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1968 (2d Battalion, 319th Artillery, cited; DA GO 22, 1976)
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation ribbon.svg Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered SOUTHWEST ASIA (1st and 2d Battalions, 319th Field Artillery, cited; DA GO 1, 1996. 3d Battalion, 319th Field Artillery cited; letter, TAPC-PDA [600-8-22], to Commander, XVIII Airborne Corps and Fort Bragg, Subj: Meritorious Unit Commendation [MUC], 26 August 1998)
  • Army Superior Unit Award, Streamer embroidered 1983 (3d Battalion, 319th Field Artillery, cited; DA GO 9, 1987)
  • Army Superior Unit Award, Streamer embroidered 1994 (1st Battalion, 319th Field Artillery, cited; DA GO 15, 1997)
  • French Croix de Guerre with Palm, World War II, Streamer embroidered STE. MERE EGLISE (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)
  • French Croix de Guerre with Palm, World War II, Streamer embroidered COTENTIN (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)
  • French Croix de Guerre, World War II, Fourragere (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)
  • Military Order of William (Degree of the Knight of the Fourth Class), Streamer embroidered NIJMEGEN 1944 (319th Glider Field Artillery Bat¬talion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)
  • Netherlands Orange Lanyard (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)
  • Belgian Fourragere 1940 (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)
  • Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action at St. Vith (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)
  • Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in the Ardennes (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)
  • Cited in the Order of the Day of the Belgian Army for action in Belgium and Germany (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; DA GO 43, 1950)[15]

Heraldry

Distinctive Unit Insignia

319FARegtDUI

319FARegtDUI
  • Description/Blazon: A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, on a bend Or three fleurs-de-lis, in sinister chief three columns and arch (from the Georgia State seal) of the second. Attached below the shield is a Gold scroll inscribed "LOYALTY" in Black letters.
  • Symbolism: Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The three fleurs-de-lis represent the three major engagements in which the Regiment participated in France; the three columns and arch are taken from the State Seal of Georgia, the birthplace of the unit and where it received its early training.
  • Background: The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 319th Field Artillery Regiment, Organized Reserves on 25 July 1925. It was redesignated for the 319th Field Artillery Battalion on 22 April 1942. The insignia was redesignated for the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion on 21 October 1942. It was redesignated for the 319th Artillery Regiment on 25 August 1958. On 1 September 1971, the insignia was redesignated for the 319th Field Artillery Regiment. It was amended to change the motto from the French to the English version on 21 January 1972.[17]

Coat of Arms

319FARegtCOA

319FARegtCOA
  • Description/Blazon
Shield: Gules, on a bend Or three fleurs-de-lis, in sinister chief three columns and arch (from the Georgia State seal) of the second.
Crest: On a wreath of the colors, Or and Gules, in front of two arrows in saltire points up of the first flighted Azure a pair of wings conjoined of the first, feathers shafted of the second, charged at center with a torteau and supporting a fleur-de-lis with center petal of the last and outer petals Vert fimbriated Gold surmounted by a lion's face affronté of the like.
Motto: LOYALTY.
  • Symbolism
Shield: Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery. The three fleurs-de-lis represent the three major engagements in which the Regiment participated in France; the three columns and arch are taken from the State Seal of Georgia, the birthplace of the unit and where it received its early training.
Crest: The wings signify the airborne heritage of the unit, the feathers with red shafts referring to participation in fourteen campaigns in Vietnam; the red disc at center alludes to the scarlet streamer of the Meritorious Unit Commendation awarded also for Vietnamese service. The arrows denote two assault landings in World War II; the feathers are blue in reference to four Presidential Unit Citations, two for World War II service and two for Vietnam. The fleur-de-lis in red and green alludes to the colors of the French Croix de Guerre, awarded three times for service in France, and the lion's face is suggested by the gold lions in the arms of Belgium and of the Netherlands, denoting awards of the Belgian Fourragere, Military Order of William and Netherlands Orange Lanyard for service in World War II.
  • Background: The coat of arms was originally approved for the 319th Field Artillery Regiment, Organized Reserves on 25 July 1925. It was redesignated for the 319th Field Artillery Battalion on 22 April 1942. The insignia was redesignated for the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion on 21 October 1942. It was redesignated for the 319th Airborne Field Artillery Battalion and amended to remove the crest for the Organized Reserves on 19 January 1950. It was redesignated for the 319th Artillery Regiment on 25 August 1958. On 1 September 1971, the insignia was redesignated for the 319th Field Artillery Regiment. It was amended to change the motto from the French to the English version on 21 January 1972. The coat of arms was amended to add a crest on 26 January 1973.[17]

References

  1. ^ McKenney, Janice E. (2010). "Battery E, 320th Field Artillery". Field Artillery Part 2 (PDF). Army Lineage Series. United States Army Center of Military History. p. 1314.
  2. ^ "Organizational History". History.army.mil. 1918-09-12. Retrieved 2014-06-04.
  3. ^ Pennypacker, Captain J. G. “The Artillery of the 82nd Division,” in Official History of 82nd Division American Expeditionary Forces (Indianapolis, The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1920), <https://archive.org/details/officialhistoryo19171919unit>, 226.
  4. ^ Pennypacker, Captain J. G. “The Artillery of the 82nd Division,” in Official History of 82nd Division American Expeditionary Forces (Indianapolis, The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1920), https://archive.org/details/officialhistoryo19171919unit, 227.
  5. ^ Pennypacker, Captain J. G. “The Artillery of the 82nd Division,” in Official History of 82nd Division American Expeditionary Forces (Indianapolis, The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1920), https://archive.org/details/officialhistoryo19171919unit, 227.
  6. ^ Streamer embroidered STE. MERE EGLISE (319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion cited; WD GO 83, 1944
  7. ^ http://cdm16635.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getfile/collection/p16635coll14/id/49008/filename/48758.pdfpage
  8. ^ http://cdm16635.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getfile/collection/p16635coll14/id/51216/filename/50935.pdfpage
  9. ^ U.S. Army Center of Military History (CMH). "1st BATTALION, 319th FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT | Lineage and Honors | U.S. Army Center of Military History (CMH)". History.army.mil. Retrieved 2014-06-04.
  10. ^ "319 Detailed". Skysoldier17.com. Retrieved 2014-06-04.
  11. ^ "OPERATION JUST CAUSE: List of Participating Units". History.army.mil. Retrieved 2014-06-04.
  12. ^ http://sill-www.army.mil/firesbulletin/archives/1990/DEC_1990/DEC_1990_FULL_EDITION.pdf
  13. ^ http://armypubs.army.mil/epubs/pdf/go9231.pdf
  14. ^ "SETAF". Desertstorm1991.com. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 4 June 2014.
  15. ^ a b c McKenney, Janice E. (2010). "319th Field Artillery". Field Artillery Part 2 (PDF). Army Lineage Series. United States Army Center of Military History. pp. 1301–1315. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  16. ^ "Afghanistan Campaign Medal or Iraq Campaign Medal." The Adjutant General Directorate (TAGD). United States Army Human Resources Command. 6 August 2015. Web, accessed 12 October 2015. <https://www.hrc.army.mil/TAGD/Afghanistan%20Campaign%20Medal%20or%20Iraq%20Campaign%20Medal> Archived 11 September 2015 at the Wayback Machine.
  17. ^ a b "319th Field Artillery Regiment". The Institute of Heraldry, The Pentagon. Retrieved 17 October 2017. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.

McKenny, Janice E. (2010). "319th Field Artillery Division". Field Artillery Part 2. Army Lineage Series. pp. 1301–1315. CMH Pub 60-11 (Part 2).

External links

101st Airborne Division Artillery

The 101st Airborne Division Artillery (DIVARTY) is the force fires headquarters for the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. The DIVARTY has served with the division in World War II, Vietnam, Operations Desert Shield and Storm, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and in peacetime at Camp Breckinridge and Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and Fort Jackson, South Carolina. The DIVARTY was inactivated in 2005 as part of transformation to modular brigade combat teams, but was reactivated on 16 October 2014 to provide fire support coordination and mission command for the training and readiness of field artillery units across the division.

173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team

The 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team (173rd ABCT) ("Sky Soldiers") is an airborne infantry brigade combat team of the United States Army based in Vicenza, Italy. It is the United States European Command's conventional airborne strategic response force for Europe.

Activated in 1915, as the 173rd Infantry Brigade, the unit saw service in World War II but is best known for its actions during the Vietnam War. The brigade was the first major United States Army ground formation deployed in Vietnam, serving there from 1965 to 1971 and losing almost 1,800 soldiers. Noted for its roles in Operation Hump and Operation Junction City, the 173d is best known for the Battle of Dak To, where it suffered heavy casualties in close combat with North Vietnamese forces. Brigade members received over 7,700 decorations, including more than 6,000 Purple Hearts. The brigade returned to the United States in 1972, where the 1st and 2d Battalion, 503d Infantry, were absorbed into the 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile), and the 3d Battalion, 319th Field Artillery was reassigned to Division Artillery in the 101st. The remaining units of the 173d were inactivated.

Since its reactivation in 2000, the brigade served five tours in the Middle East in support of the War on Terror. The 173d participated in the initial invasion of Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom in 2003, and had four tours in Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in 2005–06, 2007–08, 2009–10, and 2012–13. The brigade returned most recently from a deployment stretching from late 2013 to late 2014.

The 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team has received 21 campaign streamers and several unit awards, including the Presidential Unit Citation for its actions during the Battle of Dak To during the Vietnam War.

1st Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment

The 1st Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment ("1-319 AFAR") is the field artillery battalion assigned to the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. Nicknamed "Loyalty", 1–319 AFAR has deployed to conduct combat operations in the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Kuwait, Afghanistan and three separate deployments to Iraq. Most recently, the battalion deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

2003 invasion of Iraq order of battle

This is the order of battle for Invasion of Iraq in the Iraq War between coalition forces and Iraqi regular forces supported by Fedayeen Saddam irregulars and others between March 19 and May 1, 2003.

2nd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment

The 2nd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment ("2-319 AFAR") is the field artillery battalion that is assigned to the 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. Nicknamed "Black Falcons", 2–319 AFAR has participated in battles from World War I to the current day.

3rd Battalion

3rd Battalion may refer to:

3rd Battalion, 6th Field Artillery, a field artillery battalion of the United States Army

3rd Battalion, 16th Field Artillery, a field artillery battalion of the United States Army

3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery, a unit of the 3rd Brigade Combat Team

3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, a United States Army combined arms battalion

3rd Battalion, 126th Aviation Regiment, an aviation battalion of the United States Army Massachusetts National Guard

3rd Battalion, 153rd Infantry Regiment, a United States infantry battalion

3rd Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment, an aviation battalion of the United States Army

3rd Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, an infantry battalion of the United States Army

3rd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment, a field artillery battalion of the United States Army

3rd Battalion, CEF, a battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force

3rd Battalion, Royal Anglian Regiment, the Territorial Army unit of the Royal Anglian Regiment

3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, a parachute infantry battalion

3rd Battalion, Parachute Regiment, a battalion-sized formation of the British Army's Parachute Regiment

3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, a regular force infantry battalion

3rd Battalion, Ulster Defence Regiment, a battalion of the British Army

3rd Battalion (Australia), an infantry battalion of the Australian Army

3rd Battalion 1st Marines, an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 2nd Marines, an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 3rd Marines, an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 4th Marines, an infantry battalion of the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 5th Marines, an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 6th Marines, an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 7th Marines, an infantry battalion of the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 8th Marines, an infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 9th Marines, an infantry battalion of the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 10th Marines, an artillery battalion of the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 11th Marines, an artillery battalion of the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 12th Marines, an artillery battalion of the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 14th Marines, a reserve artillery battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 23rd Marines, a reserve infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 24th Marines, a reserve infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 25th Marines, a reserve infantry battalion in the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion 28th Marines, an inactive infantry battalion of the United States Marine Corps

3rd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment

The 3rd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment ("3–319th AFAR") is the field artillery battalion that directly supports the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division. Known as the "Gun Devils", 3–319th AFAR has participated in battles from World War I to the current day, and is one of the most highly decorated field artillery units in the United States Army. The battalion's mission is "3-319th AFAR stands ready to deploy worldwide within 18 hours of notification, execute a parachute assault and conduct full-spectrum operations. Specifically, the battalion will provide responsive lethal and nonlethal fires in support of forcible entry and airfield seizure, and integrate and synchronize the effects of fires to achieve the 1BCT commander's intent."

4th Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment

The 4th Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment (4-319th FAR) is the field artillery battalion assigned to the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team. Nicknamed "The King of the Herd", 4–319th AFAR has participated in battles from World War I to current operations around the globe. The battalion’s mission is to provide direct supporting fires to the brigade. The unit is skilled in both the art of integrating and synchronizing all available fire support assets and in the science of delivering accurate and timely lethal and non-lethal fires. “King of the Herd” Paratroopers in the 173rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne) are able to accomplish both of these tasks and other assigned missions after rapidly deploying via parachute assault.

82nd Airborne Division

The 82nd Airborne Division is an airborne infantry division of the United States Army, specializing in parachute assault operations into denied areas with a U.S. Department of Defense requirement to "respond to crisis contingencies anywhere in the world within 18 hours." Based at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, the 82nd Airborne Division is part of the XVIII Airborne Corps. The 82nd Airborne Division is the U.S. Army's most strategically mobile division. Some journalists have reported that the 82nd Airborne is the best trained light infantry division in the world. More recently, the 82nd Airborne has been conducting operations in Iraq, advising and assisting Iraqi Security Forces.The All American division was constituted, originally as the 82nd Division, in the National Army on 5 August 1917, shortly after the American entry into World War I. It was organized on 25 August 1917, at Camp Gordon, Georgia and later served with distinction on the Western Front in the final months of World War I. Since its initial members came from all 48 states, the division acquired the nickname All-American, which is the basis for its famed "AA" shoulder patch. The division later served in World War II where, in August 1942, it was reconstituted as the first airborne division of the U.S. Army and fought in numerous campaigns during the war.

Famous soldiers of the division include: Sergeant Alvin C. York; General James M. Gavin; General of the Army Omar Bradley; Senator Strom Thurmond (325th Glider Infantry Regiment in World War II); Senator Jack Reed; R&B singer Lou Rawls; actor William Windom; country music singer Craig Morgan; Renown Independent Baptist Minister Jack Hyles; former Syracuse University football coach Ben Schwartzwalder; fashion critic/choreographer Bruce Darnell; The Honorable Patrick Murphy (Under Secretary of the Army); Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards; General "Henry" Hugh Shelton (Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 1997 to 2001); and Colonel Chris Gibson, former commander of the 2d Battalion, 325th Infantry Regiment, and later commander of the division's 2d Brigade Combat Team, now a New York Congressman.

Benjamin King (author)

Benjamin King (also B. D. King) (born 1944) is an American author, military historian and noted war gamer. He served as a Field Artillery officer during the Vietnam War and later served as an historian for the US Army. He is best known for his historical novels A Bullet for Stonewall and A Bullet for Lincoln.

Division Daguet

The Division Daguet was a French Army division formed in September 1990 in Saudi Arabia as part of France's contribution to Operation Desert Shield. The French military contribution to the allied cause to liberate Kuwait from Iraqi occupation was named Opération Daguet and its ground part was subsequently named Division Daguet. In French "Daguet" is a young brocket deer.

In 1991 the division participated in Operation Desert Storm guarding the left flank of the allied advance. After Iraq surrendered the division's units returned to France and the division itself was disbanded on 30 April 1991.

Glider Badge

The Glider Badge was a qualification badge of the United States Army. According to the U.S. Army Institute of Heraldry, the badge was awarded to personnel who had "been assigned or attached to a glider or airborne unit or to the Airborne Department of the Infantry School; satisfactorily completed a course of instruction, or participated in at least one combat glider mission into enemy-held territory. The badge was authorized on 22 July 1944 A cloth circle with a glider similar to the parachute cap insignia was worn on the overseas cap.

Following the close of the Second World War, the Glider Badge was authorized to any service member who had completed glider unit training at the Airborne School.

Glider-borne soldiers wore a wing trimming (a.k.a. oval) behind their Glider Badges to signify assignment to glider units. The color pattern of the trimming varied depending upon the unit. (Note: During World War II the term "Airborne" included parachute, glider, and air-landing units. With the elimination of glider and air-landing units from the force structure in the post-war years, Airborne became synonymous with parachute units only.)

In the post-World War II years, the US Army converted its remaining glider units to parachute. For example, the 325th Glider Infantry Regiment of the 82d Airborne Division was reorganized and redesignated on 15 December 1947 as the 325th Infantry Regiment (no longer glider infantry), and then reorganized and redesignated again on 15 December 1948 as the 325th Airborne Infantry. Likewise, the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, also part of the 82d Airborne Division, was reorganized and redesignated on 15 December 1947 as the 319th Field Artillery Battalion, and then reorganized and redesignated on 15 December 1948 as the 319th Airborne Field Artillery Battalion. Although glider units had ceased to exist, the badge was not formally rescinded until 3 May 1961; however, it remained authorized for wear by those who earned it.Glider training was included in the United States Army's basic Airborne course until 1949, which at that time lasted five weeks. The first week of the course covered air transportability training, which included glider training. During late summer of that year, a glider crashed, killing many of those on board, and glider training came to an end.

Jay W. Hood

Jay W. Hood is a retired United States Army Major General. His final assignment was as Chief Of Staff of the United States Central Command. His previous assignments include Commander of First Army, Division East, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland Commanding General of Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO), Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; Assistant Division Commander (Forward), 24th Infantry Division and Deputy Commanding General (South), First Army, Fort Gillem, Georgia; Commander, 82nd Airborne Division Artillery and Commander, 3rd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment, 82nd Airborne, Fort Bragg, North Carolina; Commander, Battery D, 4th Battalion (Airborne), 325th Infantry (Battalion Combat Team), U.S. Army Southern European Task Force; and Commander, Battery A, 2nd Battalion, 321st Field Artillery Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. General Hood is a graduate of Pittsburg (KS) State University

List of United States Armed Forces unit mottoes

Many units of the United States Armed Forces have distinctive mottoes. Such mottoes are used in order to "reflect and reinforce" each unit's values and traditions. Mottoes are used by both military branches and smaller units. While some mottoes are official, others are unofficial. Some mottoes appear on unit patches, such as the U.S. Army's distinctive unit insignia.The use of mottoes is old as the U.S. military itself. A general order issued by George Washington on February 20, 1776, when he was commander-in-chief of the Continental Army, directed that "it is necessary that every Regiment should be furnished with Colours" and the "Number of the Regiment is to be mark'd on the Colours, and such a Motto, as the Colonel may choose, in fixing upon which, the General advises a Consultation amongst them."

List of paratrooper forces

Several countries around the world maintain military units that are trained as paratroopers. These include special forces units that are parachute-trained, as well as non-special forces units.

Order of battle of the Gulf War ground campaign

This is the order of battle for the ground campaign in the Gulf War between Coalition Forces and Iraqi Forces between 24–28 February 1991. The order that they are listed in are from west to east. Iraqi units that were not in the Kuwaiti Theater of Operations are excluded from this list. Some Iraqi divisions remained un-identified by American intelligence and a number of the details of the Iraqi order of battle are in dispute among various authoritative sources.

Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery

The Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery is the artillery regiment of the New Zealand Army. It is effectively a military administrative corps, and can comprise multiple component regiments. This nomenclature stems from its heritage as an offshoot of the British Army's Royal Artillery. In its current form it was founded in 1947 with the amalgamation of the regular and volunteer corps of artillery in New Zealand. In 1958 in recognition of services rendered it was given the title the Royal Regiment of New Zealand Artillery.

Ryan M. Pitts

Ryan Pitts (born October 1, 1985) is a former United States Army soldier, and is the ninth living recipient of the Medal of Honor from the War in Afghanistan.

U.S. Army Garrison Bavaria

U.S. Army Garrison Bavaria (USAG Bavaria) is a Garrison headquartered in Grafenwoehr, Germany, with four locations, which includes Grafenwoehr (Tower Barracks), Vilseck (Rose Barracks), Hohenfels (Hohenfels Training Area) and Garmisch (George C. Marshall Center and NATO School), along with Grafenwoehr Training Area Camps.

319th Field Artillery (1917-1919)
Parent unit
Components
319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion (1942-1945)
Parent unit
Components
Artillery formations of the United States
Misc. formations
Air Defense Artillery
Coast Artillery
Field Artillery

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