30th meridian west

The meridian 30° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Greenland, the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 30th meridian west forms a great circle with the 150th meridian east, and it is the reference meridian for the time zone UTC-2.

Line across the Earth
30°
30th meridian west

From Pole to Pole

Starting at the North Pole and heading south to the South Pole, the 30th meridian west passes through:

Co-ordinates Country, territory or sea Notes
90°0′N 30°0′W / 90.000°N 30.000°W Arctic Ocean
83°35′N 30°0′W / 83.583°N 30.000°W  Greenland Northern Peary Land
83°10′N 30°0′W / 83.167°N 30.000°W Frederick E. Hyde Fjord
83°8′N 30°0′W / 83.133°N 30.000°W  Greenland Southern Peary Land
82°10′N 30°0′W / 82.167°N 30.000°W Independence Fjord
81°55′N 30°0′W / 81.917°N 30.000°W  Greenland Mainland and Sokongen Island
68°10′N 30°0′W / 68.167°N 30.000°W Atlantic Ocean
60°0′S 30°0′W / 60.000°S 30.000°W Southern Ocean
76°35′S 30°0′W / 76.583°S 30.000°W Antarctica Claimed by both  Argentina (Argentine Antarctica) and  United Kingdom (British Antarctic Territory)

See also

150th meridian east

The meridian 150° east of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Asia, the Pacific Ocean, Australasia, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 150th meridian east forms a great circle with the 30th meridian west.

This is the exact middle of the Australian Eastern Standard Time Zone, where the sun rises at 6am and sets at 6pm precisely every equinox.

29th meridian west

The meridian 29° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Greenland, the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 29th meridian west forms a great circle with the 151st meridian east.

30th meridian

30th meridian may refer to:

30th meridian east, a line of longitude east of the Greenwich Meridian

30th meridian west, a line of longitude west of the Greenwich Meridian

31st meridian west

The meridian 31° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, Greenland, the Atlantic Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

The 31st meridian west forms a great circle with the 149th meridian east.

Beyond Thirty

Beyond Thirty is a short science fiction novel by American writer Edgar Rice Burroughs. It was written in 1915 and first published in All Around Magazine in February 1916, but did not appear in book form in Burroughs' lifetime. The first book edition was issued by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach's Fantasy Press fanzine in 1955; it then appeared in the collection Beyond Thirty and The Man-Eater, published by Science-Fiction & Fantasy Publications in 1957. The work was retitled The Lost Continent for the first mass-market paperback edition, published by Ace Books in October 1963; all subsequent editions bore the new title until the Bison Books edition of March 2001, which restored the original title.

Beyond Thirty and The Man-Eater

Beyond Thirty and The Man-Eater is a collection of two short novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Both were written in 1915; The Man-Eater, a jungle adventure, was first published as a serial in the New York Evening World newspaper from November 15–20, 1915, while Beyond Thirty, a science fiction story, was first published in All Around Magazine in February 1916. Neither work appeared in book form in Burroughs' lifetime. The first book versions were limited editions were issued by Lloyd Arthur Eshbach's Fantasy Press fanzine in 1955; the two works were then published in a combined edition under the present title by Science-Fiction & Fantasy Publications in 1957, through which they first reached a wide readership. Both works have since been published separately.

Bremen (aircraft)

The Bremen is a German Junkers W 33 aircraft that made the first successful transatlantic aeroplane flight from east to west on April 12 and 13, 1928.

After weather delays lasting 17 days, the Bremen left Baldonnel Aerodrome, Ireland, on April 12 and flew to Greenly Island, Canada, arriving on April 13, after a flight fraught with difficult conditions and compass problems.

The crew was to be all-German. Ehrenfried Günther Freiherr von Hünefeld, a wealthy German aristocrat, and pilot Captain Hermann Köhl had made an attempted crossing together in 1927, but had to abandon it due to bad weather. For this new attempt, they enlisted as the navigator, Major James Fitzmaurice, of Ireland. Fitzmaurice had also attempted a previous crossing as co-pilot of the Princess Xenia with Robert McIntosh, but they had to abandon the attempt due to high headwinds in September 1927.

Tropical cyclone effects in Europe

The effects of tropical cyclones in Europe and their extra-tropical remnants include strong winds, heavy rainfall, and in rare instances, tornadoes. There is only one modern tropical cyclone officially regarded as directly impacting Europe—Hurricane Vince in 2005, which struck southwestern Spain—having made landfall in the European mainland while still fully tropical. Hurricane Debbie in 1961 might have still been tropical when it made landfall in northwestern Ireland, but this is disputed.Atlantic hurricanes generally do not form east of the 30th meridian west, and those that do typically continue to the west. Storms can move around the Bermuda high and turn to the northeast and affect Europe. There have been several extratropical cyclones that struck Europe and were colloquially called hurricanes, and some of these European windstorms had hurricane-force winds of over 119 km/h (74 mph). Those storms are not included in this list.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.