300 win club

In Major League Baseball, the 300 win club is the group of pitchers who have won 300 or more games. Twenty-four pitchers have reached this milestone. The New York Gothams/Giants/San Francisco Giants are the only franchise to see three players reach the milestone while on their roster: those players are Mickey Welch, Christy Mathewson, and Randy Johnson. Early in the history of professional baseball, many of the rules favored the pitcher over the batter; the distance pitchers threw to home plate was shorter than today, and pitchers were able to use foreign substances to alter the direction of the ball.[1] The first player to win 300 games was Pud Galvin in 1888. Seven pitchers recorded all or the majority of their career wins in the 19th century: Galvin, Cy Young, Kid Nichols, Tim Keefe, John Clarkson, Charley Radbourn, and Mickey Welch.[2] Four more pitchers joined the club in the first quarter of the 20th century: Christy Mathewson, Walter Johnson, Eddie Plank, and Grover Cleveland Alexander.[1] Young is the all-time leader in wins with 511, a mark that is considered unbreakable.[3] If a modern-day pitcher won 20 games per season for 25 seasons, he would still be 11 games short of Young's mark.

Only three pitchers, Lefty Grove, Warren Spahn, and Early Wynn, joined the 300 win club between 1924 and 1982, which may be explained by a number of factors: the abolition of the spitball,[1][a] World War II military service, such as Bob Feller's,[5] and the growing importance of the home run in the game.[1] As the home run became commonplace, the physical and mental demands on pitchers dramatically increased, which led to the use of a four-man starting rotation.[1][2] Between 1982 and 1990, the 300 win club gained six members: Gaylord Perry, Phil Niekro, Steve Carlton, Nolan Ryan, Don Sutton and Tom Seaver.[2] These pitchers benefited from the increased use of specialized relief pitchers, an expanded strike zone, and new stadiums, including Shea Stadium, Dodger Stadium and the Astrodome, that were pitcher's parks, which suppressed offensive production.[2] Also, the increasing sophistication of training methods and sports medicine, such as Tommy John surgery, allowed players to maintain a high competitive level for a longer time.[6] Randy Johnson, for example, won more games in his 40s than he did in his 20s.[7]

Since 1990, only four pitchers have joined the 300 win club: Roger Clemens, Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and Johnson. Changes in the game in the last decade of the 20th century have made attaining 300 career wins difficult, perhaps more so than during the mid 20th century.[8] The four-man starting rotation has given way to a five-man rotation, which gives starting pitchers fewer chances to pick up wins.[2] No pitcher reached 20 wins in a non strike-shortened year for the first time in 2006; this was repeated in 2009 and 2017.[9]

Recording 300 career wins has been seen as a guaranteed admission to the Baseball Hall of Fame.[10][11][12] All pitchers with 300 wins have been elected to the Hall of Fame[13] except for Clemens, who received only half of the vote total needed for induction in his first appearance on the Hall of Fame ballot in 2013[14] and lost votes from that total in 2014.[15] Clemens' future election is seen as uncertain because of his alleged links to use of performance-enhancing drugs.[16] To be eligible for the Hall of Fame, a player must have "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least six months,[17] Many observers expect the club to gain few, if any, members in the foreseeable future.[13][18][19] Ten members of the 300 win club are also members of the 3,000 strikeout club.[20]

Cy Young
Cy Young is the all-time leader in wins.

Members

Kid Nichols Baseball
Kid Nichols was the youngest pitcher to win 300 games, achieving the feat at age 30.[21]
Big Unit 2009
Randy Johnson is the most recent member of the 300 win club.
Key
Pitcher Name of the pitcher
Wins Career wins
Date Date of the player's 300th win
Team The pitcher's team for his 300th win
Seasons The seasons this player played in the major leagues
dagger Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
Members of the 300 win club
Pitcher Wins Date Team Seasons Ref
Cy Youngdagger 511 July 3, 1901 Boston Americans 1890–1911 [22]
Walter Johnsondagger 417 May 14, 1920 Washington Senators 1907–1927 [23]
Grover Cleveland Alexanderdagger 373 September 20, 1924 Chicago Cubs 1911–1930 [24]
Christy Mathewsondagger 373 July 5, 1912 New York Giants 1900–1916 [25]
Pud Galvindagger 365 September 4, 1888 Pittsburgh Alleghenys 1875, 1879–1892 [26]
Warren Spahndagger 363 August 11, 1961 Milwaukee Braves 1942, 1946–1965 [27]
Kid Nicholsdagger 362 June 13, 1900 Boston Beaneaters 1890–1901, 1904-1906 [28]
Greg Madduxdagger 355 August 7, 2004 Chicago Cubs 1986–2008 [29]
Roger Clemens 354 June 13, 2003 New York Yankees 1984–2007 [30]
Tim Keefedagger 342 June 4, 1890 New York Giants (PL) 1880–1893 [31]
Steve Carltondagger 329 September 23, 1983 Philadelphia Phillies 1965–1988 [32]
John Clarksondagger 328 September 21, 1892 Cleveland Spiders 1882–1894 [33]
Eddie Plankdagger 326 September 11, 1915 St. Louis Terriers 1901–1917 [34]
Nolan Ryandagger 324 July 31, 1990 Texas Rangers 1966, 1968–1993 [35]
Don Suttondagger 324 June 18, 1986 California Angels 1966–1988 [36]
Phil Niekrodagger 318 October 6, 1985 New York Yankees 1964–1987 [37]
Gaylord Perrydagger 314 May 6, 1982 Seattle Mariners 1962–1983 [38]
Tom Seaverdagger 311 August 4, 1985 Chicago White Sox 1967–1986 [39]
Charles Radbourndagger 309 May 14, 1891 Cincinnati Reds 1880–1891 [40]
Mickey Welchdagger 307 August 11, 1890 New York Giants 1880–1892 [41]
Tom Glavinedagger 305 August 5, 2007 New York Mets 1987–2008 [42]
Randy Johnsondagger 303 June 4, 2009 San Francisco Giants 1988–2009 [43]
Early Wynndagger 300 July 13, 1963 Cleveland Indians 1939–1944, 1946-1963 [44]
Lefty Grovedagger 300 July 25, 1941 Boston Red Sox 1925–1941 [45]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Though it is illegal to doctor the baseball, Don Sutton and Gaylord Perry, members of the 300 win club and Hall of Fame, were widely suspected of this behavior.[4]

References

General

  • "Career Leaders & Records for Wins". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 6, 2010.
  • "300 Wins Club". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Archived from the original on 26 July 2010. Retrieved August 6, 2010.

Specific

  1. ^ a b c d e Amore, Don (June 16, 2003). "Breaking Down The 300 Club". Hartford Courant. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e Barra, Allen (May 26, 2003). "Baseball; 300-Victory Club Becomes Tougher to Join". The New York Times. Retrieved May 9, 2012.
  3. ^ Harkins, Bob (September 27, 2011). "Not all records are made to be broken". NBC Sports.com. Retrieved September 20, 2012.
  4. ^ Chass, Murray (June 26, 1979). "John, Perry, Sutton spitball suspected". Star-News. The New York Times News Service. Retrieved June 27, 2012.
  5. ^ Verducci, Tom (July 18, 2001). "Maddux's march toward history". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved June 27, 2012.
  6. ^ Remington, Alex (April 9, 2010). "Presenting the Tommy John All-Stars". Yahoo! Sports. Yahoo!. Retrieved June 27, 2012.
  7. ^ McCauley, Janie. "Big Unit Approaches Big Number: Next Up, No. 300". Yahoo! Sports. June 1, 2009.
  8. ^ Singer, Tom (June 5, 2009). "Johnson could close out the 300 club". MLB.com. Retrieved September 8, 2012.
  9. ^ Newman, Mark (October 3, 2009). "MLB denied 20-game winner in '09". MLB.com. Retrieved August 3, 2012.
  10. ^ Sessa, Danielle (March 30, 2007). "Mets' Glavine Nears 300 Wins, With Only Johnson, Mussina Close". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on September 25, 2013. Retrieved June 27, 2012.
  11. ^ "Yankees, Henderson continuing talks". Record-Journal. United Press International. December 8, 1984. p. 9. Retrieved June 27, 2012.
  12. ^ Weir, Tom (January 2, 1998). "3,000 hits, 500 HRs, 300 wins just about guarantee Hall entry". USA Today. p. 14.C. Retrieved June 27, 2012. (subscription required)
  13. ^ a b Kurkjian, Tim (August 5, 2007). "Glavine Could be Last to Reach 300 for Years". ESPN The Magazine. Retrieved April 16, 2012.
  14. ^ "2013 Hall of Fame Vote a Shutout" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. January 9, 2013. Retrieved January 9, 2013.
  15. ^ "Maddux, Glavine, Thomas to HOF". ESPN.com. January 8, 2014. Retrieved January 11, 2014.
  16. ^ Kurkjian, Tim (January 9, 2012). "Whopper of a list of names await in 2013". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 11, 2012. But Clemens is, after [Barry] Bonds, the next face of the steroid era. He has been charged with lying before Congress about his use of performance-enhancing drugs. He has no chance to make it to Cooperstown next year, or for many, many years to come.
  17. ^ "Rules for Election". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 30 May 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2010.
  18. ^ Bierman, Fred (May 9, 2009). "Johnson Is Next, and Possibly Last, in Line to Win 300". The New York Times. Retrieved April 16, 2012.
  19. ^ Bishop, Greg (June 2, 2009). "Johnson Quietly Nears a Defining Moment". The New York Times. Retrieved April 16, 2012.
  20. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Strikeouts". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 27, 2012.
  21. ^ O'Malley, John J. "Nichols Youngest to Win 300: "Kid" in More Ways than Won". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved September 20, 2012.
  22. ^ "Cy Young Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  23. ^ "Walter Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  24. ^ "Pete Alexander Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on September 6, 2010. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  25. ^ "Christy Mathewson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  26. ^ "Pud Galvin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  27. ^ "Warren Spahn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  28. ^ "Kid Nichols Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  29. ^ "Greg Maddux Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  30. ^ "Roger Clemens Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  31. ^ "Tim Keefe Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  32. ^ "Steve Carlton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  33. ^ "John Clarkson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  34. ^ "Eddie Plank Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  35. ^ "Nolan Ryan Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  36. ^ "Don Sutton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  37. ^ "Phil Niekro Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  38. ^ "Gaylord Perry Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  39. ^ "Tom Seaver Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  40. ^ "Old Hoss Radbourn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  41. ^ "Mickey Welch Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  42. ^ "Tom Glavine Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  43. ^ "Randy Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  44. ^ "Early Wynn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
  45. ^ "Lefty Grove Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 7, 2010.
1985 in sports

1985 in sports describes the year's events in world sport.

3,000 strikeout club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 3,000 strikeout club is the group of pitchers who have struck out 3,000 or more batters in their careers. Walter Johnson was the first to reach 3,000, doing so in 1923, and was the only pitcher at this milestone for 50 years until Bob Gibson recorded his 3,000th strikeout in 1974. In total, 17 pitchers have reached 3,000 strikeouts, with CC Sabathia, the most recent club member, joining on April 30, 2019. Sabathia joins Steve Carlton and Randy Johnson as the only left-handed pitchers in this group. Randy was the quickest pitcher to 3,000 strikeouts, taking fewer games pitched or innings pitched than any other pitcher. César Gerónimo is the only player struck out by two different pitchers for their 3,000th strikeout, first by Gibson in 1974 and then Nolan Ryan in 1980. The Minnesota Twins were the first of three franchises to see multiple pitchers record their 3,000th strikeout on their roster, first Walter Johnson (while the franchise was called the Washington Senators) in 1923 and then Bert Blyleven in 1986. The Chicago Cubs and New York Yankees are the others with Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux for the Cubs, and Phil Niekro and Sabathia for the Yankees. Ten 3,000 strikeout pitchers are also members of the 300 win club. Seven pitchers from this club were named amongst the one hundred greatest players in MLB history as part of the All-Century Team, four of whom were eventually voted as starters for the team by fan vote.Membership in the 3,000 strikeout club is often described as a guarantee of eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez, and John Smoltz are the most recently elected individuals, all voted in during 2015 balloting. Of the sixteen eligible members of the 3,000 strikeout club, fourteen have been elected to the Hall. The two who have appeared on a Hall of Fame ballot but have not yet been elected, Roger Clemens and Curt Schilling, both made their first appearances on the ballot for the 2013 elections. Each received only about half of the total votes needed for induction, with Schilling earning slightly more votes than Clemens. Clemens' future election is seen as uncertain because of his alleged links to use of performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs). The current and near-future eligibility of many players linked to PED use, combined with voting restrictions in Hall of Fame balloting, has been cited as the source of a "backlog" in future Hall elections. Eligibility requires that a player has "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least 6 months.

Aptronym

An aptronym, aptonym or euonym is a personal name aptly or peculiarly suited to its owner.

Charles Radbourn

Charles Gardner Radbourn (December 11, 1854 – February 5, 1897), nicknamed "Old Hoss", was an American professional baseball pitcher who played 12 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the Buffalo Bisons (1880), Providence Grays (1881–1885), Boston Beaneaters (1886–1889), Boston Reds (1890), and Cincinnati Reds (1891).

Born in New York and raised in Illinois, Radbourn played semi-professional and minor league baseball before making his major league debut for the Buffalo Bisons in 1880. After a one-year stint with the club, Radbourn joined the Providence Grays. During the 1884 season, Radbourn won 60 games, setting an MLB single-season record that has never been broken. He also led the National League (NL) in earned run average (ERA) and strikeouts to win the Triple Crown, and the Grays won the league championship. After the regular season, he helped the Grays win the 1884 World Series, pitching every inning of the three games.

In 1885, when the Grays team folded, the roster was transferred to NL control, and Radbourn was claimed by the Boston Beaneaters. He spent the next four seasons with the club, spent one year with the Boston Reds, and finished his MLB career with the Cincinnati Reds. Radbourn was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

Don Sutton

Donald Howard Sutton (born April 2, 1945) is an American former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a right-handed pitcher. He played for 23 total major league seasons as a member of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Houston Astros, Milwaukee Brewers, Oakland Athletics, and California Angels. He won a total of 324 games, 58 of them shutouts and five of them one-hitters, and he is seventh on baseball's all-time strikeout list with 3,574.

Sutton was born in Clio, Alabama. He attended high school and community college in Florida before entering professional baseball. After a year in the minor leagues, Sutton joined the Dodgers. Beginning in 1966, he was in the team's starting pitching rotation with Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale and Claude Osteen. Sixteen of Sutton's 23 MLB seasons were spent with the Dodgers. He registered only one 20-win season, but he earned double-digit wins in almost all of his seasons.

Sutton entered broadcasting after his retirement as a player. He has worked in this capacity for several teams, the majority being with the Atlanta Braves. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1998.

Eddie Plank

Edward Stewart Plank (August 31, 1875 – February 24, 1926), nicknamed "Gettysburg Eddie", was an American professional baseball player. A pitcher, Plank played in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 through 1914, the St. Louis Terriers in 1915, and the St. Louis Browns in 1916 and 1917.

Plank was the first left-handed pitcher to win 200 games and then 300 games, and now ranks third in all-time wins among left-handers with 326 career victories (eleventh all time) and first all-time in career shutouts by a left-handed pitcher with 66. Philadelphia went to the World Series five times while Plank played there, but he sat out the 1910 World Series due to an injury. Plank had only a 1.32 earned run average (ERA) in his World Series career, but he was unlucky, with a 2–5 win–loss record in those games.

Plank died of a stroke in 1926. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1946.

Gaylord Perry

Gaylord Jackson Perry (born September 15, 1938) is a former Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. He pitched from 1962 to 1983 for eight different teams. During a 22-year baseball career, Perry compiled 314 wins, 3,534 strikeouts, and a 3.11 earned run average. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1991.

Perry, a five-time All-Star, was the first pitcher to win the Cy Young Award in each league, winning it in the American League in 1972 with the Cleveland Indians and in the National League in 1978 with the San Diego Padres. He is also distinguished, along with his brother Jim Perry, for being part of the second-winningest brother combination in baseball history—second only to the knuckleball throwing brothers, Phil Niekro and Joe Niekro. While pitching for the Seattle Mariners in 1982, Perry became the fifteenth member of the 300 win club.

Despite Perry's notoriety for doctoring baseballs (e.g. throwing a spitball), and perhaps even more so for making batters think he was throwing them on a regular basis – he even went so far as to title his 1974 autobiography Me and the Spitter – he was not ejected for the illegal practice until August 23, 1982, in his 21st season in the majors.

Grover Cleveland Alexander

Grover Cleveland Alexander (February 26, 1887 – November 4, 1950), nicknamed "Old Pete", was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He played from 1911 through 1930 for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, and St. Louis Cardinals. He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1938.

John Clarkson

John Gibson Clarkson (July 1, 1861 – February 4, 1909) was a Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. He played from 1882 to 1894. Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Clarkson played for the Worcester Ruby Legs (1882), Chicago White Stockings (1884–1887), Boston Beaneaters (1888–1892), and Cleveland Spiders (1892–1894).

He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1963.

Kid Nichols

Charles Augustus "Kid" Nichols (September 14, 1869 – April 11, 1953) was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher who played for the Boston Beaneaters, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies from 1890 to 1906. A switch hitter who threw right-handed, he was listed at 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) and 175 pounds (79 kg). He is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Nichols played minor league baseball for three teams until 1889, when he signed with the Boston Beaneaters. After making his debut the following season and spending 12 seasons with the Beaneaters, Nichols spent a two-year sojourn in the minor leagues. He was dealt to the St. Louis Cardinals in 1904 and subsequently played for the Philadelphia Phillies, with whom he finished his career in 1906. He is famous for being the youngest pitcher to join the 300 win club.

Lefty Grove

Robert Moses "Lefty" Grove (March 6, 1900 – May 22, 1975) was an American professional baseball pitcher. After having success in the minor leagues during the early 1920s, Grove became a star in Major League Baseball with the American League's Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox. One of the greatest pitchers in history, Grove led the American League in wins in four separate seasons, in strikeouts seven years in a row, and had the league's lowest earned run average a record nine times. Over the course of the three years from 1929 to 1931 he twice won the pitcher's Triple Crown, leading the league in wins, strikeouts, and ERA, while amassing a 79-15 record and leading the Athletics to three straight AL championships. Overall, Grove won 300 games in his 17-year MLB career. He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947.

List of Major League Baseball career runs batted in leaders

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 runs batted in (RBIs) milestone. RBIs are usually accumulated by a batter in baseball by successfully allowing a runner on base to score as a result of making contact at-bat (except in certain situations, such as when an error is made on the play or during a double play), though a batter is credited with an RBI if a run scores as a result of his reaching first base with the bases loaded as a result of either a base on balls (walk), or being hit by a pitch, or interference. Albert Pujols is the only active top five RBI player in 2019.

List of Major League Baseball career runs scored leaders

Listed are all Major League Baseball (MLB) players with 1,000 or more career runs scored. Players in bold face are active as of the 2018 Major League Baseball season.

List of Major League Baseball career wins leaders

This is a list of Major League Baseball (MLB) pitchers with 200 or more career wins. In the sport of baseball, a win is a statistic credited to the pitcher for the winning team who was in the game when his team last took the lead. A starting pitcher must complete five innings to earn a win; if this does not happen, the official scorer awards the win based on guidelines set forth in the official rules.

Cy Young holds the MLB win record with 511; Walter Johnson is second with 417. Young and Johnson are the only players to earn 400 or more wins. Among pitchers whose entire careers were in the post-1920 live-ball era, Warren Spahn has the most wins with 363. Only 24 pitchers have accumulated 300 or more wins in their careers. Roger Clemens is the only pitcher with 300 wins or more not elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

MLB officially only keeps statistics from the National League and the American League. This table includes statistics from other major leagues as well which are defunct now, including the American Association (AA), the National Association of Base Ball Players and the National Association of Professional Baseball Players.

List of Major League Baseball statistical clubs

In Major League Baseball (MLB), a player joins a statistical club when he attains a certain milestone number in a specific statistical category. For milestones that encompass an entire career, batters must achieve 3,000 hits or 500 home runs; pitchers must amass 300 wins or 3,000 strikeouts. A fifth club exists for relief pitchers that have recorded 300 saves over a career. In addition, milestones achieved in a single season include hitting 50 home runs, while three other single-season statistical clubs—the 20–20–20 club, 30–30 club and 40–40 club — include achievements from multiple statistical categories.

Reaching any one of the four career milestone clubs is often described as a guarantee of eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Phil Niekro

Philip Henry Niekro (pronounced NEE-kro) (born April 1, 1939), nicknamed "Knucksie", is a former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. He played 24 seasons in the majors, 20 of them with the Milwaukee / Atlanta Braves. Niekro's 318 career victories are the most by a knuckleball pitcher and ranks 16th on the overall all-time wins list. He won the National League (NL) Gold Glove Award five times, was selected for five All-Star teams, and led the league in victories twice and earned run average once. Niekro was also a key to the only two division titles Atlanta won before 1991.

Phil and his brother Joe Niekro amassed 539 wins between them, the most combined wins by brothers in baseball history, and Phil's 121 career victories after the age of 40 is a major league record. His longevity is attributed to the knuckleball, which is a difficult pitch to master but is easy on the arm and often baffles hitters due to its unpredictable trajectory.

Niekro was the last MLB pitcher to have both won and lost 20 or more games in the same season. With the 1979 Braves, Niekro finished with 21 wins and 20 losses. This was his third and final 20-win season and his second and final 20-loss season. That season, Phil and Joe Niekro were National League co-leaders in wins.

Pud Galvin

James Francis "Pud" Galvin (December 25, 1856 – March 7, 1902) was an American Major League Baseball pitcher in the 19th century. He was MLB's first 300-game winner and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1965.

Tim Keefe

Timothy John Keefe (January 1, 1857 – April 23, 1933), nicknamed "Smiling Tim" and "Sir Timothy", was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. He stood 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall and weighed 185 pounds (84 kg). He was one of the most dominating pitchers of the 19th century and posted impressive statistics in one category or another for almost every season he pitched. He was the second MLB pitcher to record 300 wins. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964.

Keefe's career spanned much of baseball's formative stages. His first season was the last in which pitchers threw from 45 feet, so for most of his career he pitched from 50 feet. His final season was the first season in which pitchers hurled from the modern distance of 60 feet, 6 inches.

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