3000 metres

The 3000 metres or 3000-metre run is a track running event, also commonly known as the 3K or 3K run, where 7.5 laps are completed around an outdoor 400 m track or 15 laps around a 200 m indoor track.

It is debated whether the 3000m should be classified as a middle distance or long distance event.[1] In elite level competition, 3000 m pace is more comparable to the pace found in the longer 5000 metres event, rather than mile pace. The world record performance for 3000 m equates to a pace of 58.76 seconds per 400 m, which is closer to the 60.58 seconds for 5000 m than the 55.46 seconds for the mile. However, the 3000 m does require some anaerobic conditioning and an elite athlete needs to develop a high tolerance to lactic acid, as does the mile runner. Thus, the 3000 m demands a balance of aerobic endurance needed for the 5000 m and lactic acid tolerance needed for the Mile.

In men's athletics, 3000 metres has been an Olympic discipline only as a team race at the 1912, 1920 and 1924 Summer Olympics. It has not been contested at any of the IAAF outdoor championships, but is occasionally hosted at annual elite track and field meetings. It is often featured in indoor track and field programmes and is the longest distance event present at the IAAF World Indoor Championships.

In women's athletics, 3000 metres was a standard event in the Olympic Games (1984 to 1992)[2] and World Championships (1980 to 1993).[3] The event was discontinued at World Championship and Olympic level after the 1993 World Championships in AthleticsQu Yunxia being the final gold medal winner at the event. Starting with the 1995 World Championships in Athletics and the 1996 Olympic Games, it was replaced by 5000 metres, with other IAAF-organized championships following suit.

Skilled runners in this event reach speeds near vVO2max, for which the oxygen requirements of the body cannot continuously be satisfied,[4] requiring some anaerobic effort.

Athletics
3000 metres
Ejigu, Dibaba Birmingham meeting 2010
A women's indoor 3000 m race in Birmingham featuring Sentayehu Ejigu and Tirunesh Dibaba.
Men's records
WorldKenya Daniel Komen 7:20.67 (1996)
Women's records
WorldChina Wang Junxia 8:06.11 (1993)

All-time top 25

The men's world record is 7:20.67 set by Daniel Komen of Kenya in 1996. Komen also holds the world indoor mark with 7:24.90 minutes set in 1998. The women's world record is 8:06.11 set by Wang Junxia of China in 1993. The world indoor women's record is 8:16.60 minutes, set by Ethiopian Genzebe Dibaba in 2014.

Outdoor men

  • Correct as of August 2018.[5]
Pos Time Athlete Date Venue Ref
1 7:20.67  Daniel Komen (KEN) 1 September 1996 Rieti
2 7:23.09  Hicham El Guerrouj (MAR) 3 September 1999 Brussels
3 7:25.02  Ali Saïdi-Sief (ALG) 18 August 2000 Monaco
4 7:25.09  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) 28 August 1998 Brussels
5 7:25.11  Noureddine Morceli (ALG) 2 August 1994 Monaco
6 7:25.79  Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) 7 August 2007 Stockholm
7 7:26.62  Mohammed Mourhit (BEL) 18 August 2000 Monaco
8 7:27.18  Moses Kiptanui (KEN) 25 July 1995 Monaco
9 7:27.26  Yenew Alamirew (ETH) 6 May 2011 Doha
10 7:27.55  Edwin Soi (KEN) 6 May 2011 Doha
11 7:27.59  Luke Kipkosgei (KEN) 8 August 1998 Monaco
12 7:27.66  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) 6 May 2011 Doha
13 7:27.75  Tom Nyariki (KEN) 10 August 1996 Monaco
14 7:28.00  Yomif Kejelcha (ETH) 18 August 2018 Gothenburg [6]
15 7:28.28  James Kwalia (KEN) 3 September 2004 Brussels
16 7:28.41  Paul Bitok (KEN) 10 August 1996 Monaco
17 7:28.45  Assefa Mezegebu (ETH) 8 August 1998 Monaco
18 7:28.67  Benjamin Limo (KEN) 4 August 1999 Monaco
19 7:28.70  Paul Tergat (KEN) 10 August 1996 Monaco
 Tariku Bekele (ETH) 29 August 2010 Rieti
21 7:28.72  Isaac Songok (KEN) 27 August 2006 Rieti
22 7:28.73  Ronald Kwemoi (KEN) 5 May 2017 Doha [7]
23 7:28.76  Augustine Choge (KEN) 6 May 2011 Doha
24 7:28.93  Salah Hissou (MAR) 4 August 1999 Monaco
25 7:28.94  Brahim Lahlafi (MAR) 4 August 1999 Monaco

Notes

Below is a list of other times equal or superior to 7:26.69:

Outdoor women

  • Correct as of May 2019.[8]
Pos Time Athlete Date Venue Ref
1 8:06.11  Wang Junxia (CHN) 13 September 1993 Beijing
2 8:12.18  Qu Yunxia (CHN) 13 September 1993 Beijing
3 8:16.50  Zhang Linli (CHN) 13 September 1993 Beijing
4 8:19.78  Ma Liyan (CHN) 12 September 1993 Beijing
5 8:20.68  Hellen Onsando Obiri (KEN) 9 May 2014 Doha
6 8:21.14  Mercy Cherono (KEN) 9 May 2014 Doha
7 8:21.42  Gabriela Szabo (ROM) 19 July 2002 Monaco
8 8:21.64  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL) 15 July 1994 London
9 8:21.84  Zhang Lirong (CHN) 13 September 1993 Beijing
10 8:22.20  Paula Radcliffe (GBR) 19 July 2002 Monaco
11 8:22.22  Almaz Ayana (ETH) 14 June 2015 Rabat [9]
12 8:22.62  Tatyana Kazankina (URS) 26 August 1984 Leningrad
13 8:23.23  Edith Masai (KEN) 19 July 2002 Monaco
14 8:23.26  Olga Yegorova (RUS) 17 August 2001 Zürich
15 8:23.55  Faith Kipyegon (KEN) 9 May 2014 Doha
16 8:24.41  Viola Kibiwot (KEN) 9 May 2014 Doha
17 8:24.51  Meseret Defar (ETH) 14 September 2007 Brussels
18 8:25.40  Yelena Zadorozhnaya (RUS) 29 June 2001 Rome
19 8:25.56  Tatyana Tomashova (RUS) 29 Jun 2001 Rome
20 8:25.62  Berhane Adere (ETH) 17 August 2001 Zürich
21 8:25.83  Mary Slaney (USA) 7 September 1985 Rome
22 8:25.92  Gelete Burka (ETH) 25 July 2006 Stockholm
23 8:26.20  Genzebe Dibaba (ETH) 3 May 2019 Doha [10]
24 8:26.48  Zahra Ouaziz (MAR) 11 August 1999 Zürich
25 8:26.53  Tatyana Samolenko (URS) 25 September 1988 Seoul

Notes

Below is a list of other times equal or superior to 8:23.74:

  • Genzebe Dibaba 8:16.60, 8:22.50 and 8:24.85; Meseret Defar 8:23.72 and 8:24.46, Meselech Melkamu 8:23.74, Sentayehu Ejigu 8:25.27 and Laura Muir 8:26.41 have run faster than listed above indoors. The shorter indoor tracks would be disadvantageous, but because the indoor tracks are banked, they do not meet the specifications to qualify as equitable marks.

Indoor men

  • Correct as of July 2017.[11]
Pos Time Athlete Venue Date Ref
1 7:24.90  Daniel Komen (KEN) Budapest 6 February 1998
2 7:26.15  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) Karlsruhe 25 January 1998
3 7:27.80  Yenew Alamirew (ETH) Stuttgart 5 February 2011
4 7:28.00  Augustine Choge (KEN) Stuttgart 5 February 2011
5 7:29.37  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) Stuttgart 5 February 2011
6 7:29.94  Edwin Soi (KEN) Karlsruhe 12 February 2012
7 7:30.16  Galen Rupp (USA) Stockholm 21 February 2013
8 7:30.51  Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) Stockholm 20 February 2007
9 7:31.09  Tariku Bekele (ETH) Stuttgart 2 February 2008
10 7:31.66  Caleb Mwangangi Ndiku (KEN) Stockholm 21 February 2013
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25 7:34.81  Thomas Pkemei Longosiwa (KEN)

Indoor women

  • Correct as of February 2018.[12]
Pos Time Athlete Date Venue Ref
1 8:16.60  Genzebe Dibaba (ETH) 6 February 2014 Stockholm
2 8:23.72  Meseret Defar (ETH) 3 February 2007 Stuttgart
3 8:23.74  Meselech Melkamu (ETH) 3 February 2007 Stuttgart
4 8:25.27  Sentayehu Ejigu (ETH) 6 February 2010 Stuttgart
5 8:26.41  Laura Muir (GBR) 4 February 2017 Karlsruhe [13]
6 8:27.86  Liliya Shobukhova (RUS) 17 February 2006 Moscow
7 8:28.49  Anna Alminova (RUS) 7 February 2009 Stuttgart
8 8:29.00  Olesya Syreva (RUS) 17 February 2006 Moscow
9 8:29.15  Berhane Adere (ETH) 3 February 2002 Stuttgart
10 8:29.41  Hellen Obiri (KEN) 18 February 2017 Birmingham [14]
11 8:30.53  Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN) 21 February 2009 Birmingham
12 8:30.76  Sifan Hassan (NED) 18 February 2017 Birmingham [15]
13 8:31.50
14 8:31.94
15 8:32.47  Konstanze Klosterhalfen (GER) 16 February 2019 Leipzig [16]
16 8:32.88
17 8:33.25  Shalane Flanagan (USA) 27 January 2007 Boston
18 8:33.37
19 8:33.82
20 8:34.80
21 8:35.67
22 8:35.86
23 8:36.01  Shelby Houlihan (USA) 3 February 2018 Boston [17]
24 8:36.59
25 8:36.79

Notes

Below is a list of other times equal or superior to 8:29.99:

Medalists

Women's Olympic medalists

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1984 Los Angeles
Maricica Puică
 Romania
Wendy Smith-Sly
 Great Britain
Lynn Williams
 Canada
1988 Seoul
Tetyana Samolenko
 Soviet Union
Paula Ivan
 Romania
Yvonne Murray
 Great Britain
1992 Barcelona
Yelena Romanova
 Unified Team
Tetyana Dorovskikh
 Unified Team
Angela Chalmers
 Canada

Women's World Championships medalists

Championships Gold Silver Bronze
1980 Sittard
 Birgit Friedmann (FRG)  Karoline Nemetz (SWE)  Ingrid Kristiansen (NOR)
1983 Helsinki
 Mary Decker (USA)  Brigitte Kraus (FRG)  Tatyana Kovalenko-Kazankina (URS)
1987 Rome
 Tetyana Samolenko (URS)  Maricica Puică (ROU)  Ulrike Bruns (GDR)
1991 Tokyo
 Tetyana Dorovskikh (URS)  Yelena Romanova (URS)  Susan Sirma (KEN)
1993 Stuttgart
 Qu Yunxia (CHN)  Zhang Linli (CHN)  Zhang Lirong (CHN)

Men's World Indoor Championships medalists

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1985 Paris[A]  João Campos (POR)  Don Clary (USA)  Ivan Uvizl (TCH)
1987 Indianapolis
 Frank O'Mara (IRL)  Paul Donovan (IRL)  Terry Brahm (USA)
1989 Budapest
 Saïd Aouita (MAR)  José Luis González (ESP)  Dieter Baumann (FRG)
1991 Seville
 Frank O'Mara (IRL)  Hammou Boutayeb (MAR)  Robert Denmark (GBR)
1993 Toronto
 Gennaro Di Napoli (ITA)  Éric Dubus (FRA)  Enrique Molina (ESP)
1995 Barcelona
 Gennaro Di Napoli (ITA)  Anacleto Jiménez (ESP)  Brahim Jabbour (MAR)
1997 Paris
 Haile Gebrselassie (ETH)  Paul Bitok (KEN)  Ismaïl Sghyr (MAR)
1999 Maebashi
 Haile Gebrselassie (ETH)  Paul Bitok (KEN)  Million Wolde (ETH)
2001 Lisbon
 Hicham El Guerrouj (MAR)  Mohammed Mourhit (BEL)  Alberto García (ESP)
2003 Birmingham
 Haile Gebrselassie (ETH)  Alberto García (ESP)  Luke Kipkosgei (KEN)
2004 Budapest
 Bernard Lagat (KEN)  Rui Silva (POR)  Markos Geneti (ETH)
2006 Moscow
 Kenenisa Bekele (ETH)  Saif Saaeed Shaheen (QAT)  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN)
2008 Valencia
 Tariku Bekele (ETH)  Paul Kipsiele Koech (KEN)  Abreham Cherkos (ETH)
2010 Doha
 Bernard Lagat (USA)  Sergio Sánchez (ESP)  Sammy Alex Mutahi (KEN)
2012 Istanbul
 Bernard Lagat (USA)  Augustine Kiprono Choge (KEN)  Edwin Soi (KEN)
2014 Sopot
 Caleb Ndiku (KEN)  Bernard Lagat (USA)  Dejen Gebremeskel (ETH)
2016 Portland
 Yomif Kejelcha (ETH)  Ryan Hill (USA)  Augustine Kiprono Choge (KEN)
2018 Birmingham
 Yomif Kejelcha (ETH)  Selemon Barega (ETH)  Bethwell Birgen (KEN)

Women's World Indoor Championships medalists

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1985 Paris[A]  Debbie Scott (CAN)  Agnese Possamai (ITA)  PattiSue Plumer (USA)
1987 Indianapolis
 Tatyana Samolenko (URS)  Olga Bondarenko (URS)  Maricica Puică (ROU)
1989 Budapest
 Elly van Hulst (NED)  Liz McColgan (GBR)  Margareta Keszeg (ROU)
1991 Seville
 Marie-Pierre Duros (FRA)  Margareta Keszeg (ROU)  Lyubov Kremlyova (URS)
1993 Toronto
 Yvonne Murray (GBR)  Margareta Keszeg (ROU)  Lynn Jennings (USA)
1995 Barcelona
 Gabriela Szabo (ROU)  Lynn Jennings (USA)  Joan Nesbit (USA)
1997 Paris
 Gabriela Szabo (ROU)  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL)  Fernanda Ribeiro (POR)
1999 Maebashi
 Gabriela Szabo (ROU)  Zahra Ouaziz (MAR)  Regina Jacobs (USA)
2001 Lisbon
 Olga Yegorova (RUS)  Gabriela Szabo (ROU)  Yelena Zadorozhnaya (RUS)
2003 Birmingham
 Berhane Adere (ETH)  Marta Domínguez (ESP)  Meseret Defar (ETH)
2004 Budapest
 Meseret Defar (ETH)  Berhane Adere (ETH)  Shayne Culpepper (USA)
2006 Moscow
 Meseret Defar (ETH)  Liliya Shobukhova (RUS)  Lidia Chojecka (POL)
2008 Valencia
 Meseret Defar (ETH)  Meselech Melkamu (ETH)  Mariem Alaoui Selsouli (MAR)
2010 Doha
 Meseret Defar (ETH)  Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN)  Sentayehu Ejigu (ETH)
2012 Istanbul
 Hellen Obiri (KEN)  Meseret Defar (ETH)  Gelete Burka (ETH)
2014 Sopot
 Genzebe Dibaba (ETH)  Hellen Obiri (KEN)  Maryam Yusuf Jamal (BHR)
2016 Portland
 Genzebe Dibaba (ETH)  Meseret Defar (ETH)  Shannon Rowbury (USA)
2018 Birmingham
 Genzebe Dibaba (ETH)  Sifan Hassan (NED)  Laura Muir (GBR)
  • A Known as the World Indoor Games

Season's bests

Men (outdoor)

Year Time Athlete Location
1970 7:49.4  Bernd Diessner (GDR) Potsdam
1971 7:39.8  Emiel Puttemans (BEL) Brussels
1972 7:37.6  Emiel Puttemans (BEL) Århus
1973 7:42.0  Brendan Foster (GBR) London
1974 7:35.1  Brendan Foster (GBR) Gateshead
1975 7:45.0  Rod Dixon (NZL) Paris
1976 7:43.46  Rod Dixon (NZL) Cologne
1977 7:41.22  Karl Fleschen (FRG) Cologne
1978 7:32.1  Henry Rono (KEN) Oslo
1979 7:37.70  Rudy Chapa (USA) Eugene
1980 7:37.60  Eamonn Coghlan (IRL) Oslo
1981 7:36.69  Steve Scott (USA) Ingelheim
1982 7:32.79  David Moorcroft (GBR) London
1983 7:35.84  Doug Padilla (USA) Oslo
1984 7:33.3  Saïd Aouita (MAR) Brussels
1985 7:32.94  Saïd Aouita (MAR) Brussels
1986 7:32.23  Saïd Aouita (MAR) Cologne
1987 7:40.25  Dieter Baumann (FRG) Berlin
1988 7:38.79  Sydney Maree (USA) Malmö
1989 7:29.45  Saïd Aouita (MAR) Cologne
1990 7:37.09  Khalid Skah (MAR) Cologne
1991 7:33.91  Dieter Baumann (GER) Cologne
1992 7:28.96  Moses Kiptanui (KEN) Cologne
1993 7:29.24  Noureddine Morceli (ALG) Monaco
1994 7:25.11  Noureddine Morceli (ALG) Monaco
1995 7:27.18  Moses Kiptanui (KEN) Monaco
1996 7:20.67  Daniel Komen (KEN) Rieti
1997 7:26.02  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) Brussels
1998 7:25.09  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) Brussels
1999 7:23.09  Hicham El Guerrouj (MAR) Brussels
2000 7:25.02  Ali Saïdi-Sief (ALG) Monaco
2001 7:30.53  Hailu Mekonnen (ETH) Brussels
2002 7:34.72  Benjamin Limo (KEN) Monaco
2003 7:30.23  Hicham El Guerrouj (MAR) Turin
2004 7:27.72  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) Brussels
2005 7:28.56  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) Doha
2006 7:28.72  Isaac Kiprono Songok (KEN) Rieti
2007 7:25.79  Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) Stockholm
2008 7:31.83  Edwin Cheruiyot Soi (KEN) Rieti
2009 7:28.37  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) Doha
2010 7:28.70  Tariku Bekele (ETH) Rieti
2011 7:27.26  Yenew Alamirew (ETH) Doha
2012 7:30.42  Augustine Choge (KEN) Doha
2013 7:30.36  Hagos Gebrhiwet (ETH) Doha
2014 7:31.66  Caleb Ndiku (KEN) Ostrava
2015 7:38.08  Hagos Gebrhiwet (ETH) Doha
2016 7:28.19  Yomif Kejelcha (ETH) Saint-Denis
2017 7:28.73  Ronald Kwemoi (KEN) Doha
2018 7:28.00  Yomif Kejelcha (ETH) Gothenburg
2019 7:51.63  Harry Summers (AUS) Melbourne

Men (indoor)

Year Time Athlete Location
1970 7:46.85  Richard Wilde (GBR) Vienna
1971 7:53.6  Peter Stewart (GBR) Sofia
1972 7:50.0  Ian Stewart (GBR) Cosford
1973 7:44.6  Emiel Puttemans (BEL) Rotterdam
1974 7:48.48  Emiel Puttemans (BEL) Gothenburg
1975 7:50.2  Boris Kuznetsov (URS) Sverdlovsk
1976 7:50.2  Emiel Puttemans (BEL) Paris
1977 7:47.9  Suleiman Nyambui (TAN) Louisville
1978 7:48.6  Nick Rose (GBR) Long Beach
1979 7:44.43  Markus Ryffel (SUI) Vienna
1980 7:45.2  Steve Scott (USA) Long Beach
1981 7:48.8  Lubomír Tesáček (TCH) Prague
1982 7:46.2  Doug Padilla (USA) Daly City
1983 7:49.1  Doug Padilla (USA) Daly City
1984 7:46.87  Doug Padilla (USA) East Rutherford
1985 7:42.97  Christoph Herle (FRG) Dortmund
1986 7:46.46  Stefano Mei (ITA) Budapest
1987 7:47.95  Paul Donovan (IRL) East Rutherford
1988 7:41.57  Brian Abshire (USA) East Rutherford
1989 7:39.71  Saïd Aouita (MAR) East Rutherford
1990 7:43.69  Doug Padilla (USA) East Rutherford
1991 7:41.14  Frank O'Mara (IRL) Seville
1992 7:36.66  Saïd Aouita (MAR) Piraeus
1993 7:38.46  Moses Kiptanui (KEN) Stockholm
1994 7:40.94  Moses Kiptanui (KEN) Lievin
1995 7:35.15  Moses Kiptanui (KEN) Ghent
1996 7:30.72  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) Stuttgart
1997 7:31.27  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) Karlsruhe
1998 7:24.90  Daniel Komen (KEN) Budapest
1999 7:26.80  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) Karlsruhe
2000 7:35.84  Million Wolde (ETH) Stuttgart
2001 7:37.74  Hicham El Guerrouj (MAR) Lisbon
2002 7:37.13  Alberto García (ESP) Seville
2003 7:28.29  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) Karlsruhe
2004 7:29.34  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH) Karlsruhe
2005 7:39.89  Alistair Cragg (IRL) Roxbury
2006 7:33.07  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) Karlsruhe
2007 7:30.51  Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) Karlsruhe
2008 7:31.09  Tariku Bekele (ETH) Stuttgart
2009 7:32.80  Paul Kipsiele Koech (KEN) Stockholm
2010 7:31.75  Augustine Kiprono Choge (KEN) Stockholm
2010 7:27.80  Yenew Alamirew (ETH) Stuttgart
2012 7:29.94  Augustine Choge (KEN) Karlsruhe
2013 7:30.16  Galen Rupp (USA) Stockholm
2014 7:34.13  Hagos Gebrhiwet (ETH) Boston
2015 7:33.1+ h  Mo Farah (GBR) Birmingham
2016 7:38.03  Dejen Gebremeskel (ETH) Boston
2017 7:40.80 +  Ryan Hill (USA) New York City
2018 7:36.64  Selemon Barega (ETH) Liévin
2019 7:37.41  Hagos Gebrhiwet (ETH) Boston

Women (outdoor)

Year Time Athlete Location
1971 9:23.4  Joyce Smith (GBR) London
1972 8:53.0  Lyudmila Bragina (URS) Moscow
1973 8:56.6  Paola Pigni (ITA) Formia
1974 8:52.74  Lyudmila Bragina (URS) Durham
1975 8:46.6  Grete Waitz (NOR) Oslo
1976 8:27.12  Lyudmila Bragina (URS) College Park
1977 8:36.8  Grete Waitz (NOR) Oslo
1978 8:32.1  Grete Waitz (NOR) Oslo
1979 8:31.75  Grete Waitz (NOR) Oslo
1980 8:33.53  Yelena Sipatova (URS) Moscow
1981 8:34.30  Maricica Puică (ROU) Bucharest
1982 8:26.78  Svetlana Ulmasova (URS) Kiev
1983 8:32.08  Tatyana Kazankina (URS) Saint Petersburg
1984 8:22.62  Tatyana Kazankina (URS) Saint Petersburg
1985 8:25.83  Mary Slaney (USA) Rome
1986 8:33.99  Olga Bondarenko (URS) Stuttgart
1987 8:38.1  Ulrike Bruns (GDR) Potsdam
1988 8:26.53  Tatyana Samolenko (URS) Seoul
1989 8:38.48  Paula Ivan (ROU) Gateshead
1990 8:38.38  Angela Chalmers (CAN) Auckland
1991 8:32.00  Elana Meyer (RSA) Durban
1992 8:33.72  Yelena Romanova (RUS) Cologne
1993 8:06.11  Wang Junxia (CHN) Beijing
1994 8:21.64  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL) London
1995 8:27.57  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL) Zurich
1996 8:35.42  Sonia O'Sullivan (IRL) Nice
1997 8:27.78  Gabriela Szabo (ROU) Zurich
1998 8:24.31  Gabriela Szabo (ROU) Paris
1999 8:25.03  Gabriela Szabo (ROU) Zurich
2000 8:26.35  Gabriela Szabo (ROU) Zurich
2001 8:23.26  Olga Yegorova (RUS) Zurich
2002 8:21.42  Gabriela Szabo (ROU) Monte Carlo
2003 8:33.95  Gabriela Szabo (ROU) Zurich
2004 8:31.32  Isabella Ochichi (KEN) Paris
2005 8:28.87  Maryam Yusuf Jamal (BHR) Oslo
2006 8:24.66  Meseret Defar (ETH) Stockholm
2007 8:24.81  Meseret Defar (ETH) Brussels
2008 8:33.66  Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN) Gateshead
2009 8:30.15  Meseret Defar (ETH) Thessaloniki
2010 8:28.41  Sentayehu Ejigu (ETH) Monaco
2011 8:46.84  Viola Jelagat Kibiwot (KEN) Rabat
2012 8:34.47  Mariem Alaoui Selsouli (MAR) Eugene
2013 8:30.29  Meseret Defar (ETH) Stockholm
2014 8:20.68  Hellen Onsando Obiri (KEN) Doha
2015 8:22.22  Almaz Ayana (ETH) Rabat
2016 8:23.11  Almaz Ayana (ETH) Doha
2017 8:23.14  Hellen Obiri (KEN) Monaco
2018 8:27.50  Sifan Hassan (NED) Ostrava
2019 8:56.55  Lonah Chemtai Salpeter (ISR) Tel Aviv

Women (indoor)

Year Time Athlete Location
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997 8:45.75  Gabriela Szabo (ROM) Paris
1998 8:43.99  Fernanda Ribeiro (POR) Genoa
1999 8:34.09  Gabriela Szabo (ROM) Liévin
2000 8:35.42  Gabriela Szabo (ROM) Birmingham
2001 8:32.88  Gabriela Szabo (ROM) Birmingham
2002 8:29.15  Berhane Adere (ETH) Stuttgart
2003 8:31.73  Berhane Adere (ETH) Stuttgart
2004 8:33.05  Berhane Adere (ETH) Dortmund
2005 8:30.05  Meseret Defar (ETH) Boston
2006 8:27.86  Liliya Shobukhova (RUS) Moscow
2007 8:23.72  Meseret Defar (ETH) Stuttgart
2008 8:27.93  Meseret Defar (ETH) Stuttgart
2009 8:26.99  Meseret Defar (ETH) Stuttgart
2010 8:24.46  Meseret Defar (ETH) Stuttgart
2011 8:30.26  Sentayehu Ejigu (ETH) Birmingham
2012 8:31.56  Meseret Defar (ETH) Birmingham
2013 8:26.95  Genzebe Dibaba (ETH) Stockholm
2014 8:16.60  Genzebe Dibaba (ETH) Stockholm
2015 8:37.22+  Genzebe Dibaba (ETH) Stockholm
2016 8:22.50  Genzebe Dibaba (ETH) Sabadell
2017 8:26.41  Laura Muir (GBR) Karlsruhe
2018 8:31.23  Genzebe Dibaba (ETH) Sabadell
2019 8:30.61  Laura Muir (GBR) Glasgow

External links

Notes and references

  1. ^ Middle-distance running. Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved on 2014-06-02.
  2. ^ Women's 3000 metres at the Olympic Games. Sport Reference. Retrieved on 2014-01-18.
  3. ^ World Championships in Athletics. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2014-01-18.
  4. ^ Billat, Véronique L.; J. Pierre Koralsztein (August 1996). "Significance of the Velocity at VO2max and Time to Exhaustion at this Velocity" (PDF). Sports Med. 2: 90–108. Archived from the original (PDF) on 21 March 2012. Retrieved 27 March 2011.
  5. ^ "All-time men's best 3000m". alltime-athletics.com. 18 July 2017. Retrieved 21 July 2017.
  6. ^ "3000m Results". SF. 18 August 2018. Retrieved 21 August 2018.
  7. ^ "3000m Results" (PDF). sportresult.com. 5 May 2017. Retrieved 5 May 2017.
  8. ^ "All-time women's best 3000m". alltime-athletics.com. 18 July 2017. Retrieved 21 July 2017.
  9. ^ "3000m Results". IAAF. 14 June 2015. Retrieved 14 June 2015.
  10. ^ "3000m Results" (PDF). sportresult.com. 3 May 2019. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  11. ^ "All-time men's best 3000m indoor". IAAF. 21 July 2017. Retrieved 21 July 2017.
  12. ^ "All-time women's best 3000m indoor". IAAF. 21 July 2017. Retrieved 21 July 2017.
  13. ^ "Laura Muir smashes European 3000m record in Karlsruhe". athleticsweekly.com. 4 February 2017. Retrieved 4 February 2017.
  14. ^ "3000m Results" (PDF). British Athletics. 18 February 2017. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 March 2017. Retrieved 18 February 2017.
  15. ^ "3000m Results" (PDF). British Athletics. 18 February 2017. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 March 2017. Retrieved 18 February 2017.
  16. ^ Bob Ramsak (17 February 2019). "Indoor round-up: Ndama tallies 4672 pentathlon world lead in Miramas, world leads for Klosterhalfen and Schwanitz in Leipzig". IAAF. Retrieved 22 February 2019.
  17. ^ John Mulkeen (5 February 2018). "Taplin and Oduduru climb world all-time sprint lists – indoor round-up". IAAF. Retrieved 5 February 2018.
1990 European Athletics Championships – Women's 3000 metres

These are the official results of the Women's 3000 metres event at the 1990 European Championships in Split, Yugoslavia, held at Stadion Poljud on 27 and 29 August 1990.

1994 European Athletics Championships – Women's 3000 metres

These are the official results of the Women's 3,000 metres event at the 1994 European Championships in Helsinki, Finland, held at Helsinki Olympic Stadium on 7 and 10 August 1994.

2008 World Junior Championships in Athletics – Women's 3000 metres

The women's 3000 metres event at the 2008 World Junior Championships in Athletics was held in Bydgoszcz, Poland, at Zawisza Stadium on 12 July.

2011 European Athletics Indoor Championships – Women's 3000 metres

The women's 3000 metres event at the 2011 European Athletics Indoor Championships was held on March 5–6 with the final being held on March 6 at 15:15 local time.

2015 European Athletics Indoor Championships – Men's 3000 metres

The men's 3000 metres event at the 2015 European Athletics Indoor Championships was held on 6 March at 18:00 (heats) and on 7 March at 19:45 (final) local time.

2018 IAAF World U20 Championships – Women's 3000 metres

The women's 3000 metres at the 2018 IAAF World U20 Championships was held at Ratina Stadium on 11 July.

3000 metres race walk

The 3000 metres race walk is a racewalking event. The event is competed as a track race and was part of the athletics programme for women at the IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics until 1993. Athletes must always keep in contact with the ground and the supporting leg must remain straight until the raised leg passes it. 3000 meters is 1.86 miles.

3000 metres steeplechase

The 3000 metres steeplechase or 3000-meter steeplechase is the most common distance for the steeplechase in track and field. It is an obstacle race over the distance of the 3000 metres, which derives its name from the horse racing steeplechase.

Athletics at the 1972 Summer Olympics – Men's 3000 metres steeplechase

These are the official results of the men's 3000 metres steeplechase event at the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich. The competition was held on 1 and 4 September.

Athletics at the 1988 Summer Olympics – Women's 3000 metres

The women's 3000 metres at the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea had an entrylist of 35 competitors, with two qualifying heats (35) before the final (15) took place on Sunday September 25, 1988.

Athletics at the 1992 Summer Olympics – Women's 3000 metres

These are the official results of the women's 3000 metres event at the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. There were a total of 34 participating athletes, with three qualifying heats.

Athletics at the 2008 Summer Olympics – Men's 3000 metres steeplechase

The Men's 3000 metres steeplechase at the 2008 Olympic Games took place on 16–18 August at the Beijing Olympic Stadium.The qualifying standards were 8:24.60 (A standard) and 8:32.00 (B standard).Brimin Kipruto, who won the silver medal at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, became the seventh Kenyan runner in a row to win this event at the Olympics. In total Kenya won nine gold medals in the 3000m steeplechase since 1968, but none of those medalists was ever able to defend his title.

Athletics at the 2008 Summer Olympics – Women's 3000 metres steeplechase

The women's 3000 metres steeplechase at the 2008 Summer Olympics occurred on 15–17 August at the Beijing National Stadium, the first time this event had ever been held at the Olympics.

The qualifying standards were 9:46.00 (A standard) and 9:55.00 (B standard).In the final, Gulnara Samitova-Galkina of Russia won with an Olympic record.

Yekaterina Volkova of Russia tested positive for dehydrochlormethyltestosterone (turinabol) and was disqualified.

Athletics at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Men's 3000 metres steeplechase

The Men's 3000 metres steeplechase competition at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom. The event was held at the Olympic Stadium on 3–5 August.The steeplechase has become a national event of Kenya. Their team tactics dominate major championship races. For the first 5 laps, they let others dominate the lead, primarily led by Americans Donald Cabral and Evan Jager. Then the Kenyans decided to move as a team, leaving the field to chase. With less than 800 metres to go, Ugandan Benjamin Kiplagat got tangled up on a barrier and fell flat on his face, the runners behind him having to scramble. 200 metres later, Kenyan Brimin Kipruto fell. Though he quickly scrambled to his feet, that effectively ruined the chances for a Kenyan sweep. Still the other two led through the final lap. Former gold medalist and multiple world champion Ezekiel Kemboi pulled away off the front. As Abel Mutai began to falter, Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad sprinted past to repeat his silver medal. Kemboi's lead was secure and after clearing the final barrier, he began to celebrate, drifting out to lane 8 by the time he crossed the finish line.

After the finish, Kemboi did the victory dance he has become known for. He and Mekhissi-Benabbad exchanged jerseys and the diminutive Kemboi leaped into the much larger Mekhissi-Benabbad's arms.

Athletics at the 2012 Summer Olympics – Women's 3000 metres steeplechase

The Women's 3000 metres steeplechase at the 2012 Summer Olympics took place on 4–6 August at the Olympic Stadium.From the gun in the final, reigning world champion Yuliya Zaripova sprinted out to the lead and dictated the pace. But rather than continuing to accelerate, she slowed, with the rest of the field bunching behind with nobody willing to go around. The pack slowly disintegrated by attrition. With 3 laps to go a group of seven had separated, including all three Ethiopians, plus Milcah Chemos Cheywa, Mercy Wanjiku Njoroge and Habiba Ghribi, all still behind Zaripova. On the 6th lap, defending champion and World Record holder Gulnara Galkina, already off the back, made a right turn and stepped off the track. The pace quickened, losing Etenesh Diro and Njoroge at the water jump. Zaripova just continued to accelerate. On the back stretch Ghribi looked to be clear of the other three but almost put her hand out so as not to pass Zaripova. From that point, Zaripova just extended her lead with Ghribi clearly in second place. Sofia Assefa broke away from her teammate Hiwot Ayalew. Down the home stretch Cheywa made a late run but Assefa held on for the bronze medal.Compared to the previous year's world championships, the first two medalists were the same, Zaripova a second faster for her personal record, Ghribi was 3 seconds faster for her Tunisian national record, and Assefa 19 seconds faster to push Cheywa off the podium.On 24 March 2016 the Court of Arbitration for Sport disqualified Yuliya Zaripova's results from 20 July 2011 to 25 July 2013 for doping, which included the Olympics. On 4 June 2016, Tunisian Habiba Ghribi was awarded with the olympic gold medal in a ceremony in Rades, Tunisia, presented by IOC Vice-President Nawal El Moutawakel.

Athletics at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Men's 3000 metres steeplechase

The men's 3000 metres steeplechase competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil was held at the Olympic Stadium between 15–17 August.

Athletics at the 2016 Summer Olympics – Women's 3000 metres steeplechase

The Women's 3000 metres steeplechase competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics took place between 13–15 August at the Olympic Stadium.

Middle-distance running

Middle-distance running events are track races longer than sprints, up to 3000 metres. The standard middle distances are the 800 metres, 1500 metres and mile run, although the 3000 metres may also be classified as a middle-distance event. The 1500 m came about as a result of running ​3 3⁄4 laps of a 400 m outdoor track or ​7 1⁄2 laps of a 200 m indoor track, which were commonplace in continental Europe in the 20th century.

Steeplechase (athletics)

The steeplechase is an obstacle race in athletics, which derives its name from the steeplechase in horse racing. The foremost version of the event is the 3000 metres steeplechase. The 2000 metres steeplechase is the next most common distance. The 1900 Olympics featured a 2500 metres steeplechase and a 4000 metres steeplechase, and a 2590 metres steeplechase was held at the 1904 Olympics. A 1000 metres steeplechase is occasionally used in youth athletics.

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Field
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