30–30 club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 30–30 club is the group of batters who have collected 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases in a single season.[1][2] Ken Williams was the first to achieve this, doing so in 1922.[3][4] He remained the sole member of the club for 34 years until Willie Mays achieved consecutive 30–30 seasons in 1956 and 1957.[4][5] Bobby Bonds became the club's fourth member in 1969 and became the first player in MLB history to reach the 30–30 club on three occasions and ultimately on five occasions,[5][6] subsequently achieving the milestone in 1973, 1975, 1977 and 1978.[4] He remained the only player to accomplish this until 1997, when his son Barry Bonds achieved his fifth 30–30 season.[4] The most recent players to reach the milestone are José Ramírez and Mookie Betts, who achieved the feat during the 2018 season.

In total, 40 players have reached the 30–30 club in MLB history and 13 have done so more than once. Of these 40 players, 27 were right-handed batters, eight were left-handed and five were switch hitters, meaning they could bat from either side of the plate. The Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Indians, Colorado Rockies and New York Mets are the only franchises to have three players reach the milestone. Five players—Hank Aaron, Barry Bonds, Willie Mays, Alex Rodriguez and Sammy Sosa—are also members of the 500 home run club,[7] and Aaron, Mays and Rodriguez are also members of the 3,000 hit club.[8] Dale Murphy, Jose Canseco, Barry Bonds, Larry Walker, Jimmy Rollins, Braun and Betts won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in the same year as their 30–30 season, with Bonds achieving this on two occasions (1990 and 1992).[9] Both Mays and Rollins also reached the 20–20–20 club in the same season.[10][11][12] Four different players accomplished 30–30 seasons in 1987, 1996, 1997 and 2011, the most in a single season.[4]

Due to the rarity of a player excelling in the combination of hitting home runs and stealing bases,[5] Baseball Digest called the 30–30 club "the most celebrated feat that can be achieved by a player who has both power and speed."[2] Of the 22 members eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame, five have been elected and two were elected on the first ballot. Eligibility requires that a player has "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least six months,[13] disqualifying nine active players and six players who have been retired for less than five seasons.

20060825 Barry Bonds follow through
Barry Bonds joined the 30–30 club in five seasons, a record he shares with his father Bobby.

Members

Willie Mays cropped
Willie Mays became the first player to achieve multiple 30–30 seasons and accomplish them in back-to-back seasons.[2][5]
Hank Aaron 1960
Hank Aaron is one of five 30–30 club members to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
Baseball barry larkin 2004
Barry Larkin attained 30–30 in 1996.
Alfonso Soriano
Alfonso Soriano reached the 30–30 club in four seasons, second only to Bobby and Barry Bonds.
Ryan Braun 2008-2
Ryan Braun is the most recent player to reach the 30–30 club in multiple seasons (2011 and 2012).
José Ramírez (infielder) vs. Orioles 2017
José Ramírez joined the 30–30 club in 2018.
Mookie Betts hitting the ball (36478781664)
Mookie Betts was the second player to join the 30–30 club in 2018.
Key
Year The year the player's 30–30 season occurred
Player (X) Name of the player and number of 30–30 seasons they had accomplished at that point
Italics Player achieved the 40–40 club that year
Team The player's team for his 30–30 season
HR Number of home runs in that year
SB Number of stolen bases in that year
^ Denotes 40–40 season
Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
Active player Player is active
Members of the 30–30 club
Year Player Team HR SB Ref
1922 Ken Williams St. Louis Browns 39 37 [14]
1956 Willie MaysElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame New York Giants 36 40 [12]
1957 Willie MaysElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame (2) New York Giants 35 38 [12]
1963 Hank AaronElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Milwaukee Braves 44 31 [15]
1969 Bobby Bonds San Francisco Giants 32 45 [16]
1970 Tommy Harper Milwaukee Brewers 31 38 [17]
1973 Bobby Bonds (2) San Francisco Giants 39 43 [16]
1975 Bobby Bonds (3) New York Yankees 32 30 [16]
1977 Bobby Bonds (4) California Angels 37 41 [16]
1978 Bobby Bonds (5) Chicago White Sox
Texas Rangers
31 43 [16]
1983 Dale Murphy Atlanta Braves 36 30 [18]
1987 Joe Carter Cleveland Indians 32 31 [19]
1987 Eric Davis Cincinnati Reds 37 50 [20]
1987 Howard Johnson New York Mets 36 32 [21]
1987 Darryl Strawberry New York Mets 39 36 [22]
1988 Jose Canseco Oakland Athletics 42^ 40^ [23]
1989 Howard Johnson (2) New York Mets 36 41 [21]
1990 Barry Bonds Pittsburgh Pirates 33 52 [24]
1990 Ron Gant Atlanta Braves 32 33 [25]
1991 Ron Gant (2) Atlanta Braves 32 34 [25]
1991 Howard Johnson (3) New York Mets 38 30 [21]
1992 Barry Bonds (2) Pittsburgh Pirates 34 39 [24]
1993 Sammy Sosa Chicago Cubs 33 36 [26]
1995 Barry Bonds (3) San Francisco Giants 33 31 [24]
1995 Sammy Sosa (2) Chicago Cubs 36 34 [26]
1996 Dante Bichette Colorado Rockies 31 31 [27]
1996 Barry Bonds (4) San Francisco Giants 42^ 40^ [24]
1996 Ellis Burks Colorado Rockies 40 32 [28]
1996 Barry LarkinElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Cincinnati Reds 33 36 [29]
1997 Jeff BagwellElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Houston Astros 43 31 [30]
1997 Barry Bonds (5) San Francisco Giants 40 37 [24]
1997 Raúl Mondesí Los Angeles Dodgers 30 32 [31]
1997 Larry Walker Colorado Rockies 49 33 [32]
1998 Shawn Green Toronto Blue Jays 35 35 [33]
1998 Alex Rodriguez Seattle Mariners 42^ 46^ [34]
1999 Jeff Bagwell (2)Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Houston Astros 42 30 [30]
1999 Raúl Mondesí (2) Los Angeles Dodgers 33 36 [31]
2000 Preston Wilson Florida Marlins 31 36 [35]
2001 Bobby Abreu Philadelphia Phillies 31 36 [36]
2001 José Cruz, Jr. Toronto Blue Jays 34 32 [37]
2001 Vladimir GuerreroElected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Montreal Expos 34 37 [38]
2002 Vladimir Guerrero (2)Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame Montreal Expos 39 40 [38]
2002 Alfonso Soriano New York Yankees 39 41 [39]
2003 Alfonso Soriano (2) New York Yankees 38 35 [39]
2004 Bobby Abreu (2) Philadelphia Phillies 30 40 [36]
2004 Carlos Beltrán Kansas City Royals
Houston Astros
38 42 [40]
2005 Alfonso Soriano (3) Texas Rangers 36 30 [39]
2006 Alfonso Soriano (4) Washington Nationals 46^ 41^ [39]
2007 David Wright New York Mets 30 34 [41]
2007 Jimmy Rollins Philadelphia Phillies 30 41 [42]
2007 Brandon PhillipsActive player Cincinnati Reds 30 32 [43]
2008 Grady Sizemore Cleveland Indians 33 38 [44]
2008 Hanley RamírezActive player Florida Marlins 33 35 [45]
2009 Ian KinslerActive player Texas Rangers 31 30 [46]
2011 Matt KempActive player Los Angeles Dodgers 39 40 [47]
2011 Ryan BraunActive player Milwaukee Brewers 33 33 [48]
2011 Jacoby EllsburyActive player Boston Red Sox 32 39 [49]
2011 Ian KinslerActive player (2) Texas Rangers 32 30 [46]
2012 Ryan BraunActive player (2) Milwaukee Brewers 41 30 [48]
2012 Mike TroutActive player Los Angeles Angels 30 49 [50]
2018 José RamírezActive player Cleveland Indians 39 34 [51]
2018 Mookie BettsActive player Boston Red Sox 32 30 [52]

See also

References

General

  • "30–30 Club". Baseball-Almanac.com. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  • "The 30–30 Club – Rare Feats". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved July 4, 2012.

Specific

  1. ^ Dorfman, John (April 17, 2011). "His 30–30 club has 5 stocks as stars". Omaha.com (Bloomberg News). Archived from the original on January 31, 2013. Retrieved June 24, 2012. In baseball, the club is for ballplayers who belt 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in the same season.
  2. ^ a b c Deane, Bill (May 1987). "Here Are Top Candidates To Join Elite '30–30' Club". Baseball Digest. Evanston, Illinois: Century Publishing. 46 (5): 34. ISSN 0005-609X. Retrieved July 8, 2012.
  3. ^ Vass, George (July 2004). "Baseball's Forgotten Stars". Baseball Digest. Evanston, Illinois: Century Publishing. 63 (7): 31. ISSN 0005-609X. Retrieved July 9, 2012.
  4. ^ a b c d e Newman, Mark (August 30, 2011). "Versatile crop of players could join 30–30 club". MLB.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  5. ^ a b c d Stewart, Wayne (May 1990). "Blend of Power and Speed: A Major League Rarity". Baseball Digest. Evanston, Illinois: Century Publishing. 49 (5): 34–35. ISSN 0005-609X. Retrieved July 8, 2012.
  6. ^ Dorfman, John (April 12, 2010). "Three Stocks Take Top Honors In Elite 30–30 Club". Bloomberg. Retrieved June 25, 2012. Bobby Bonds and his son Barry Bonds each did it five times.
  7. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Home Runs". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  8. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Hits". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  9. ^ "Most Valuable Player MVP Awards & Cy Young Awards Winners". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 24, 2012.
  10. ^ "Rollins gets 20th triple and joins rare 20–20–20–20 club". ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures. Associated Press. September 30, 2007. Retrieved July 21, 2012.
  11. ^ Tsao, Bryan; Bolado, Carolina; Distelheim, Joe (November 30, 2007). The Hardball Times Baseball Annual 2008. ACTA Publications. p. 26. Retrieved July 8, 2012. Wasn't Jimmy Rollins...the key to this offense? Thirty home runs, more than 200 hits, the fourth 20–20–20–20 (doubles, triples, home runs and stolen bases) player in the history of the game.
  12. ^ a b c "Willie Mays Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 8, 2012.
  13. ^ "Rules for Election". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 4, 2012.
  14. ^ "Ken Williams Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  15. ^ "Hank Aaron Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  16. ^ a b c d e "Bobby Bonds Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  17. ^ "Tommy Harper Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  18. ^ "Dale Murphy Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  19. ^ "Joe Carter Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  20. ^ "Eric Davis Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  21. ^ a b c "Howard Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  22. ^ "Darryl Strawberry Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  23. ^ "Jose Canseco Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  24. ^ a b c d e "Barry Bonds Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  25. ^ a b "Ron Gant Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  26. ^ a b "Sammy Sosa Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  27. ^ "Dante Bichette Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  28. ^ "Ellis Burks Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  29. ^ "Barry Larkin Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  30. ^ a b "Jeff Bagwell Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  31. ^ a b "Raúl Mondesí Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  32. ^ "Larry Walker Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  33. ^ "Shawn Green Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  34. ^ "Alex Rodriguez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  35. ^ "Preston Wilson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  36. ^ a b "Bobby Abreu Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  37. ^ "José Cruz Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  38. ^ a b "Vladimir Guerrero Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  39. ^ a b c d "Alfonso Soriano Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  40. ^ "Carlos Beltrán Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  41. ^ "David Wright Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  42. ^ "Jimmy Rollins Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved May 8, 2012.
  43. ^ "Brandon Phillips Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  44. ^ "Grady Sizemore Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  45. ^ "Hanley Ramírez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  46. ^ a b "Ian Kinsler Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  47. ^ "Matt Kemp Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  48. ^ a b "Ryan Braun Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  49. ^ "Jacoby Ellsbury Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  50. ^ "Mike Trout Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 30, 2012.
  51. ^ "Jose Ramirez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 9, 2018.
  52. ^ "Mookie Betts Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 26, 2018.
1987 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 1987 season was the 26th regular season for the Mets. They went 92-70 and finished 2nd in the NL East. They were managed by Davey Johnson. The team played home games at Shea Stadium.

20–20–20 club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 20–20–20 club is the group of batters who have collected 20 doubles, 20 triples and 20 home runs in a single season. Frank Schulte was the first to achieve this, doing so in 1911. The last players to reach the milestone—Curtis Granderson and Jimmy Rollins—attained 20–20–20 during the 2007 season. This marked the first time that two players accomplished the achievement in the same season.

In total, only seven players are members of the 20–20–20 club. Of these, five were left-handed batters, one was right-handed and one was a switch hitter, meaning he could bat from either side of the plate. Two players—George Brett and Willie Mays—are also members of the 3,000 hit club, and Mays is also a member of the 500 home run club. Schulte, Rollins, and Jim Bottomley won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in the same year as their 20–20–20 season. Both Mays and Rollins joined the club while also hitting 30 home runs and stealing 30 bases that same season to join the 30–30 club. Brett and Rollins collected more than 200 hits alongside achieving 20–20–20. Furthermore, four players amassed 20 or more stolen bases during their 20–20–20 season. These players are collectively referred to as the 20–20–20–20 club.Historically, there have been numerous players who have hit 20 doubles and 20 home runs in a year. It is the component of triples, however, that makes the 20–20–20 club so difficult to achieve. This is because hitting triples often comes under a similar hit placement as doubles, but may require impressive speed on the part of the runner. This would pose a challenge for both a slugger, who may be slower at running the bases and have the tendency to hit line drives and fly balls out of the park for a home run, as well as a speedster, who may be more swift around the bases but may not supply much power to drive the ball far.

Due to the rare occurrence and low membership of the 20–20–20 club, Baseball Digest called it "the most exclusive club in the Majors" in 1979, when there were only four members. Of the five members eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame, three have been elected and two were elected on the first ballot.

Barry Larkin

Barry Louis Larkin (born April 28, 1964) is a retired Major League Baseball (MLB) player who played shortstop for the Cincinnati Reds from 1986 to 2004.

Born and raised in Cincinnati, Larkin attended the University of Michigan, where he played college baseball. He briefly played in the minor leagues before making his MLB debut in 1986. He quickly won the starting shortstop role for the Reds and enjoyed a long run of strong seasons with the team. Larkin struggled with a string of injuries between 1997 and 2003, limiting his playing time in several seasons.

Larkin retired after the 2004 season and worked in a front office position for the Washington Nationals for several years until he joined ESPN as a baseball analyst. He served as a coach for the American team in the 2009 World Baseball Classic and managed the Brazilian national team in the qualifiers for the same event in 2013.

Larkin is considered one of the top players of his era, winning nine Silver Slugger awards, three Gold Glove awards, and the 1995 National League Most Valuable Player Award. He was selected to the Major League All-Star Game twelve times, and was one of the pivotal players on the 1990 Reds' World Series championship team. Larkin was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in January 2012 and was inducted on July 22, 2012.

Dante Bichette

Alphonse Dante Bichette Sr. (; born November 18, 1963) is a former professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball as an outfielder for the California Angels (1988–1990), Milwaukee Brewers (1991–1992), Colorado Rockies (1993–1999), Cincinnati Reds (2000), and Boston Red Sox (2000–2001). He was also the hitting coach for the Rockies in 2013. He batted and threw right-handed.

Bichette was a four-time All-Star as a member of the Rockies, and was a member of the 1993 inaugural team. In 1995, he won the Silver Slugger Award and finished second in the Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) voting while leading the National League in home runs, runs batted in, slugging percentage, total bases and hits. The next year, he joined the 30–30 club with 31 home runs and 31 stolen bases, and in 1998, again led the league in hits with 219. Each year from 1993−1998 he batted over .300, and in each year from 1995−1999, drove in at least 100 runs.

David Wright

David Allen Wright (born December 20, 1982) is an American former professional baseball third baseman who played his entire 14-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career for the New York Mets. He was drafted by the Mets in 2001 and made his major league debut on July 21, 2004 at Shea Stadium. Wright was nicknamed "Captain America" after his performance in the 2013 World Baseball Classic.Wright is a seven-time All-Star, a two-time Gold Glove Award winner, a two-time Silver Slugger Award winner, and a member of the 30–30 club. He holds Mets franchise records for most career runs batted in (RBIs), doubles, total bases, runs scored, walks, sacrifice flies, times on base, extra base hits, strikeouts, double plays, and hits. He was named captain of the Mets in 2013, becoming the fourth captain in the team's history.

Throughout the latter half of Wright's career, he was plagued by injuries, most notably spinal stenosis, as well as additional ailments in his neck and shoulder. After missing significant time from 2015 to 2018 and receiving word from doctors that his spinal stenosis would not improve, Wright announced that 2018 would be his final season as an active player. Wright finished his major league career with a .296 career batting average, 242 home runs, and 970 runs batted in. Upon completion of his playing career, Wright was named a special advisor in the Mets front office.

Eric Davis (baseball)

Eric Keith Davis (born May 29, 1962) is an American former center fielder for several Major League Baseball (MLB) teams, most notably the Cincinnati Reds, to which he owes his nickname Eric the Red. Davis was 21 years old when he made his major league debut with the Reds on May 19, 1984. Davis spent eight seasons with the Reds and later played for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Detroit Tigers, Baltimore Orioles, St. Louis Cardinals, and San Francisco Giants. A right-handed batter and fielder, Davis was blessed with a mesmerizing combination of athletic ability, including excellent foot and bat speed, tremendous power, and superlative defensive acumen. He became one of baseball's most exciting players during his peak, achieving a number of rare feats. In 1987, he became the first player in major league history to hit three grand slams in one month and the first to achieve at least 30 home runs and 50 stolen bases in the same season.

A native of Los Angeles, California, the Reds selected Davis in the eighth round of the 1980 amateur draft from John C. Fremont High School in South Los Angeles, where he was a heavily recruited college basketball prospect. In his major league career, he often sustained injuries while winning two MLB All-Star Game selections, three Rawlings Gold Glove Awards and two Silver Slugger Awards. Over a 162-game period spanning June 11, 1986, to July 4, 1987, he batted .308, .406 on-base percentage, .622 slugging percentage with 47 home runs, 149 runs scored, 123 runs batted in (RBI) and 98 stolen bases. In 1990, he became a World Series champion in the Reds' upset and four-game sweep of the Oakland Athletics.

A series of injuries derailed what seemed to be an even more promising career as he moved to the Dodgers and then the Tigers, and he retired in 1994. In 1996, Davis successfully restarted his baseball career with the Reds and was named the comeback player of the year. He moved to the Orioles and, despite fighting colon cancer, he had one of his best statistical seasons in 1998. Injuries again slowed Davis over the next few seasons, and he retired for good in 2001.

Along with other business interests, Davis currently works as a roving instructor in the Reds organization.

Howard Johnson (baseball)

Howard Michael Johnson (born November 29, 1960), nicknamed HoJo (the nickname of the otherwise unrelated Howard Johnson's company), is a former Major League Baseball third baseman. He played for the Detroit Tigers, New York Mets, Colorado Rockies and Chicago Cubs from 1982 to 1995. He is third on the Mets' all-time lists for home runs, runs batted in, doubles, and stolen bases. He also played for the Rockland Boulders of the Canadian-American Association of Professional Baseball. On July 13, 2007, he was promoted from his position as the Mets' first base coach to their hitting coach which he held until the end of the 2010 season. From 2014 to June 2015, he was the hitting coach of the Seattle Mariners after starting 2013 as the batting instructor for the Tacoma Rainiers, the Mariners' Triple-A affiliate.

Ian Kinsler

Ian Michael Kinsler (born June 22, 1982) is an American professional baseball second baseman for the San Diego Padres of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Texas Rangers, Detroit Tigers, Los Angeles Angels, and Boston Red Sox. With the Red Sox, he won the 2018 World Series over the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Despite having been drafted in only the 17th round out of college, Kinsler has risen to become a four-time All-Star, and a member of the Sporting News' 2009 list of the 50 greatest current players in baseball. He is known as a five-tool player, hitting for average and power, and excelling in baserunning, throwing, and fielding.Kinsler has twice hit 30 home runs and stolen 30 bases in the same season (2009 and 2011), and is one of 12 ballplayers in major league history who have had multiple 30–30 club seasons. In 2011, he also joined the 20–20 club for the third time, one season shy of the major league record for a second baseman. He hit for the cycle in a game in 2009, while getting hits in all six of his at bats.

Through 2013, Kinsler led the Texas Rangers, all-time, career-wise, in stolen bases and power-speed number. In November 2013, he was traded to the Detroit Tigers for Prince Fielder. He has been awarded both a Fielding Bible Award (2015) and two Gold Glove Awards (2016 and 2018). Through 2018, on defense Kinsler had the best career range factor of any active second baseman in MLB, while on offense among all active players he was third in power–speed number, fourth in career runs scored, and eighth in career doubles.

Jacoby Ellsbury

Jacoby McCabe Ellsbury ( jə-KOH-bee; born September 11, 1983) is an American professional baseball center fielder for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He played in MLB for the Boston Red Sox from 2007 through 2013, and joined the Yankees before the 2014 season.

Ellsbury was first drafted by the Tampa Bay Devil Rays in the 23rd round of the 2002 MLB draft, but did not sign. He was drafted next as 23rd overall by the Red Sox in the 2005, after playing college baseball for three years at Oregon State University. Ellsbury was the first Red Sox player in history to be a member of the 30–30 club. In 2011, Ellsbury also won the Gold Glove Award, the Silver Slugger Award, and was the American League MVP runner-up to Justin Verlander. After the 2013 season, Ellsbury signed a 7-year, $153 million contract with the Yankees in free agency.

Ellsbury is an enrolled member of the Colorado River Indian Tribes; Ellsbury's mother, Margie, is full-blooded Navajo and his father is of English and German descent. Ellsbury is the first Native American of Navajo descent to reach the major leagues. In 2008, he was one of three active non-Hispanic Native American players in Major League Baseball, along with Kyle Lohse and Joba Chamberlain.

Jeff Bagwell

Jeffrey Robert Bagwell (born May 27, 1968) is an American former professional first baseman and coach who spent his entire 15-year Major League Baseball (MLB) playing career with the Houston Astros. Originally a Boston Red Sox fourth-round selection from the University of Hartford as a third baseman in the 1989 amateur draft, he was then traded to the Astros in 1990. The National League (NL) Rookie of the Year in 1991, Bagwell then won the NL Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1994, was a four-time MLB All-Star, three-time Silver Slugger winner and a Gold Glove recipient. Forming a core part of Astros lineups with Craig Biggio and Lance Berkman given the epithet "Killer B's", Houston finished in first or second place in the National League Central division in 11 of 12 seasons from 1994 to 2005. They qualified for the playoffs six times, culminating in Bagwell's lone World Series appearance in 2005. He was elected to the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 2005, and to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2017.

Bagwell was part of the trade that sent relief pitcher Larry Andersen to the Red Sox, now regarded as one of the most lopsided trades in sports history. Andersen pitched just 22 innings for Boston while Bagwell hit 449 home runs for the Astros, the most in club history, among setting numerous other franchise career and single-season records. He excelled at every major aspect of the game, including hitting, on-base ability, running, defense, and throwing. One of the most consistent players of his generation, in each of his first 11 seasons, he produced no fewer than 4.7 wins above replacement (WAR) per Baseball-Reference.com. His 1994 season was perhaps his finest. As the fourth unanimous NL MVP in history, he set the record for fewest plate appearances to reach both 100 runs scored and 100 runs batted in, produced a .750 slugging percentage − the highest in the NL since 1925 − while batting a career-high .368. In 1999, he finished second in the MVP voting, producing his second career 30–30 season.

The only player in MLB history to have six consecutive seasons (1996–2001) with 30 home runs, 100 RBI, 100 runs scored, and 100 walks. Bagwell is just the fifth to achieve 300 home runs, 1,000 RBI, and 1,000 runs scored in his first 10 seasons. He is one of 12 players in history to hit 400 home runs and record an on-base percentage (OBP) of .400, and the only first baseman with at least 400 home runs and 200 stolen bases. Overall, Bagwell batted over .300 six times, had a career OBP of .408 (39th all-time) and a slugging percentage of .540 (32nd all-time). He is the only first baseman to achieve the 30–30 club more than once. His 79.6 career WAR per Baseball-Reference.com ranks sixth all-time among first basemen.

Since his playing career ended, Bagwell has served in sporadic instructor assignments with the Astros, including as hitting coach in 2010.

Ken Williams (baseball)

Kenneth Roy Williams (June 28, 1890 – January 22, 1959) was an American professional baseball player. He played as an outfielder in Major League Baseball from 1915 to 1929. Williams began his major league career with the Cincinnati Reds before spending the majority of his playing days with the St. Louis Browns, and finally ended his career playing for the Boston Red Sox. He batted left-handed and threw right-handed. Williams was the first member of Major League Baseball's 30–30 club, for players who have reached the 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases plateaus in the same season.

Kim Dae-eui

Kim Dae-Eui (Korean: 김대의; born 30 May 1974) is a South Korean football player who plays for Home United FC as a winger and attacker.

He started his career as a professional footballer at Seongnam Ilhwa Chunma. In Seongnam, he won the MVP award of the K-League's 2002 season. Before he joined Seongnam, he was a member of Korea U-20 team in 1992 and Universiade team in 1997.

In 2004, he joined another Korean club side Suwon Samsung Bluewings and helped the team to become the Korean champions in the same year.

He is member of 30–30 Club since 16 June 2007.He is a close friend with fellow footballer Choi Sung-Yong, who played with him in the national team and at the Bluewings.

Kim Eun-jung (footballer)

Kim Eun-jung (Hangul: 김은중; born 8 April 1979) is a South Korean retired footballer who played as a striker. He is currently a coach at Tubize after joining the team in 2015 as a youth scout.He played in the South Korea national team at 1998 Asian Games in Bangkok and 2004 AFC Asian Cup in China. He was also a member of South Korea under-23 team at 2002 Asian Games in Busan.

He was a member of 30–30 Club since 3 May 2008 at K League. He is now a member of 50–50 club members.

List of K League 30-30 club members

K League 30-30 club are K-League footballers who have more than 30 goals and more than 30 assists in the K-League.

Preston Wilson

Preston James Richard Wilson (born July 19, 1974) is a former professional baseball center fielder. He played all or part of ten seasons in Major League Baseball from 1998 to 2007. He is both the nephew and stepson of former New York Mets outfielder Mookie Wilson. (Mookie married Preston's mother after his brother fathered Preston.)

Raúl Mondesí

Raúl Ramón Mondesí Avelino (born March 12, 1971) is a Dominican former politician who was the mayor of San Cristóbal, Dominican Republic, and a former professional baseball right fielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for 13 seasons, primarily for the Los Angeles Dodgers, and made his MLB debut with them in 1993. He was the National League (NL) Rookie of the Year in 1994, an MLB All-Star, and a two-time Rawlings Gold Glove Award winner. Known for his combination of power and speed, Mondesí twice achieved the 30–30 club. Also noted for his strong throwing arm, he led right fielders in his league in assists three times while registering over 100 in his career.

After baseball, Mondesí began a career in politics, gaining election to the Dominican Chamber of Deputies in 2006. In 2010, he became mayor of San Cristóbal for a six-year term. On September 20, 2017, Mondesí was sentenced to eight years in prison on corruption charges.

Ron Gant

Ronald Edwin Gant (born March 2, 1965) is an American television news anchor and former baseball player who played for the Atlanta Braves (1987–1993), Cincinnati Reds (1995), St. Louis Cardinals (1996–1998), Philadelphia Phillies (1999–2000), Anaheim Angels (2000), Colorado Rockies (2001), Oakland Athletics (2001), San Diego Padres (2002), and again the Athletics briefly in 2003. Gant is currently a co-host on WAGA-TV's morning news program Good Day Atlanta.

He joined the 30–30 club (at least 30 stolen bases and at least 30 home runs in the same season) in 1990 and 1991 with the Braves. He is right-handed.

Tommy Harper

Tommy Harper (born October 14, 1940 in Oak Grove, Louisiana) is an American former Major League Baseball outfielder and third baseman. He played with the Cincinnati Reds (1962–67), Cleveland Indians (1968), Seattle Pilots (1969), Milwaukee Brewers (1970–71), Boston Red Sox (1972–74), California Angels (1975), Oakland Athletics (1975), and the Baltimore Orioles (1976).

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