3,000 strikeout club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 3,000 strikeout club is the group of pitchers who have struck out 3,000 or more batters in their careers. Walter Johnson was the first to reach 3,000, doing so in 1923, and was the only pitcher at this milestone for 50 years until Bob Gibson recorded his 3,000th strikeout in 1974. In total, 17 pitchers have reached 3,000 strikeouts, with CC Sabathia, the most recent club member, joining on April 30, 2019.[1] Sabathia joins Steve Carlton and Randy Johnson as the only left-handed pitchers in this group.[2][3] Randy was the quickest pitcher to 3,000 strikeouts, taking fewer games pitched or innings pitched than any other pitcher.[4] César Gerónimo is the only player struck out by two different pitchers for their 3,000th strikeout, first by Gibson in 1974 and then Nolan Ryan in 1980.[5] The Minnesota Twins were the first of three franchises to see multiple pitchers record their 3,000th strikeout on their roster, first Walter Johnson (while the franchise was called the Washington Senators) in 1923 and then Bert Blyleven in 1986. The Chicago Cubs and New York Yankees are the others with Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux for the Cubs, and Phil Niekro and Sabathia for the Yankees. Ten 3,000 strikeout pitchers are also members of the 300 win club.[6] Seven pitchers from this club were named amongst the one hundred greatest players in MLB history as part of the All-Century Team, four of whom were eventually voted as starters for the team by fan vote.[7][8]

Membership in the 3,000 strikeout club is often described as a guarantee of eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame.[9][10] Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez, and John Smoltz are the most recently elected individuals, all voted in during 2015 balloting.[11] Of the sixteen eligible members of the 3,000 strikeout club, fourteen have been elected to the Hall. The two who have appeared on a Hall of Fame ballot but have not yet been elected, Roger Clemens and Curt Schilling, both made their first appearances on the ballot for the 2013 elections. Each received only about half of the total votes needed for induction, with Schilling earning slightly more votes than Clemens.[12] Clemens' future election is seen as uncertain because of his alleged links to use of performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs).[13] The current and near-future eligibility of many players linked to PED use, combined with voting restrictions in Hall of Fame balloting, has been cited as the source of a "backlog" in future Hall elections.[14][15] Eligibility requires that a player has "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least 6 months.[16]

Nolan Ryan in Atlanta close-up
Nolan Ryan is Major League Baseball's all-time strikeout leader at 5,714.

Key

Player Name of the player
Strikeouts Career strikeouts
IP Career innings pitched
Date Date of the pitcher's 3,000th strikeout
Batter The batter struck out for the pitcher's 3,000th strikeout
Team The pitcher's team for his 3,000th strikeout
Seasons The seasons this player played in the major leagues
dagger Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
double-dagger Player is active

Club members

Randy Johnson 04
Hall of Famer Randy Johnson, second all-time in strikeouts, is one of only three left-handed pitchers with 3,000 strikeouts in MLB history.
John Smoltz 3000 strikeouts
An electronic banner announcing the milestone achievement of John Smoltz recording his 3000th strikeout during a game in April 2008
Player Strikeouts IP K/IP Date Batter Team Seasons Ref
Nolan Ryandagger 5,714 5,386 1.06 July 4, 1980[5] César Gerónimo[5] Houston Astros 1966, 1968–1993 [17]
Randy Johnsondagger 4,875 4,135 13 1.18 September 10, 2000[5] Mike Lowell[5] Arizona Diamondbacks 1988–2009 [3]
Roger Clemens 4,672 4,916 23 0.95 July 5, 1998[5] Randy Winn[5] Toronto Blue Jays 1984–2007 [18]
Steve Carltondagger 4,136 5,217 13 0.79 April 29, 1981[5] Tim Wallach[5] Philadelphia Phillies 1965–1988 [2]
Bert Blylevendagger 3,701 4,970 0.74 August 1, 1986[5] Mike Davis[5] Minnesota Twins 1970–1992 [19]
Tom Seaverdagger 3,640 4,782 23 0.76 April 18, 1981[5] Keith Hernandez[5] Cincinnati Reds 1967–1986 [20]
Don Suttondagger 3,574 5,282 13 0.68 June 24, 1983[5] Alan Bannister[5] Milwaukee Brewers 1966–1988 [21]
Gaylord Perrydagger 3,534 5,350 13 0.66 October 1, 1978[5] Joe Simpson[5] San Diego Padres 1962–1983 [22]
Walter Johnsondagger 3,508 5,914 23 0.59 July 22, 1923 Stan Coveleski Washington Senators 1907–1927 [23]
Greg Madduxdagger 3,371 5,008 13 0.67 July 26, 2005[24] Omar Vizquel[24] Chicago Cubs 1986–2008 [25]
Phil Niekrodagger 3,342 5,404 13 0.62 July 4, 1984[5] Larry Parrish[5] New York Yankees 1964–1987 [26]
Ferguson Jenkinsdagger 3,192 4,500 23 0.71 May 25, 1982[5] Garry Templeton[5] Chicago Cubs 1965–1983 [27]
Pedro Martínezdagger 3,154 2,827 13 1.12 September 3, 2007[9] Aaron Harang[9] New York Mets 1992–2009 [28]
Bob Gibsondagger 3,117 3,884 13 0.80 July 17, 1974[5] César Gerónimo[5] St. Louis Cardinals 1959–1975 [29]
Curt Schilling 3,116 3,261 0.96 August 30, 2006[30] Nick Swisher[30] Boston Red Sox 1988–2007 [31]
John Smoltzdagger 3,084 3,473 0.88 April 22, 2008[32] Felipe López[32] Atlanta Braves 1988–1999, 2001–2009 [33]
CC Sabathiadouble-dagger 3,052 3,533 0.86 April 30, 2019[1] John Ryan Murphy[1] New York Yankees 2001–present [34]

See also

References

General
  • "Career Leaders & Records for Strikeouts". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved April 30, 2019.
Specific
  1. ^ a b c "3K for CC! Lefty 17th to achieve K milestone". MLB.com. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Steve Carlton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 4 January 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  3. ^ a b "Randy Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  4. ^ Luft, Jacob (September 20, 2000). "3k the fast way: Big Unit is quickest to 3,000 strikeouts". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on February 19, 2012. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "Johnson joins 3K club in Arizona's loss to Florida". Sports Illustrated. Associated Press. Archived from the original on February 19, 2012. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  6. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Wins". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  7. ^ "The All-Century Team". MLB.com. Archived from the original on 19 January 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  8. ^ "All-Century Team final voting". ESPN. October 23, 1999. Retrieved January 20, 2010.
  9. ^ a b c Noble, Marty (September 3, 2007). "Pedro records 3,000th strikeout". MLB.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  10. ^ Mitchell, Fred (July 20, 2005). "Maddux on the verge of 3,000 strikeouts". Chicago Tribune.
  11. ^ "Hall of Fame Class of 2015" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. January 6, 2015. Retrieved January 6, 2015.
  12. ^ "2013 Hall of Fame Vote a Shutout" (Press release). National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. January 9, 2013. Retrieved January 9, 2013.
  13. ^ Kurkjian, Tim (January 9, 2012). "Whopper of a list of names await in 2013". ESPN.com. Retrieved May 21, 2012. But Clemens is, after [Barry] Bonds, the next face of the steroid era. He has been charged with lying before Congress about his use of performance-enhancing drugs. He has no chance to make it to Cooperstown next year, or for many, many years to come.
  14. ^ Caple, Jim (December 22, 2010). "The Hall of Fame ballot runneth over". ESPN.com. Page 2. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  15. ^ Caple, Jim (January 4, 2012). "Too many good Hall candidates for limit". Page 2. ESPN. Retrieved July 21, 2013.
  16. ^ "Rules for Election". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on 30 May 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2010.
  17. ^ "Nolan Ryan Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 4 January 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  18. ^ "Roger Clemens Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 4 January 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  19. ^ "Bert Blyleven Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  20. ^ "Tom Seaver Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 4 January 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  21. ^ "Don Sutton Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  22. ^ "Gaylord Perry Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 12 February 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  23. ^ "Walter Johnson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  24. ^ a b Muskat, Carrie (July 26, 2005). "Giant milestone: Maddux fans No. 3,000". MLB.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  25. ^ "Greg Maddux Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  26. ^ "Phil Niekro Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  27. ^ "Fergie Jenkins Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  28. ^ "Pedro Martínez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 4 January 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  29. ^ "Bob Gibson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 4 January 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  30. ^ a b "Schilling reaches 3,000 career strikeouts". ESPN Internet Ventures. Associated Press. August 31, 2006. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  31. ^ "Curt Schilling Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  32. ^ a b Bowman, Mark (April 23, 2008). "Smoltz enters exclusive 3,000 K-Zone". MLB.com. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  33. ^ "John Smoltz Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on 4 January 2010. Retrieved January 18, 2010.
  34. ^ "CC Sabathia Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved April 30, 2019.
1923 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1923 throughout the world.

2019 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 2019 throughout the world.

300 win club

In Major League Baseball, the 300 win club is the group of pitchers who have won 300 or more games. Twenty-four pitchers have reached this milestone. The New York Gothams/Giants/San Francisco Giants are the only franchise to see three players reach the milestone while on their roster: those players are Mickey Welch, Christy Mathewson, and Randy Johnson. Early in the history of professional baseball, many of the rules favored the pitcher over the batter; the distance pitchers threw to home plate was shorter than today, and pitchers were able to use foreign substances to alter the direction of the ball. The first player to win 300 games was Pud Galvin in 1888. Seven pitchers recorded all or the majority of their career wins in the 19th century: Galvin, Cy Young, Kid Nichols, Tim Keefe, John Clarkson, Charley Radbourn, and Mickey Welch. Four more pitchers joined the club in the first quarter of the 20th century: Christy Mathewson, Walter Johnson, Eddie Plank, and Grover Cleveland Alexander. Young is the all-time leader in wins with 511, a mark that is considered unbreakable. If a modern-day pitcher won 20 games per season for 25 seasons, he would still be 11 games short of Young's mark.

Only three pitchers, Lefty Grove, Warren Spahn, and Early Wynn, joined the 300 win club between 1924 and 1982, which may be explained by a number of factors: the abolition of the spitball, World War II military service, such as Bob Feller's, and the growing importance of the home run in the game. As the home run became commonplace, the physical and mental demands on pitchers dramatically increased, which led to the use of a four-man starting rotation. Between 1982 and 1990, the 300 win club gained six members: Gaylord Perry, Phil Niekro, Steve Carlton, Nolan Ryan, Don Sutton and Tom Seaver. These pitchers benefited from the increased use of specialized relief pitchers, an expanded strike zone, and new stadiums, including Shea Stadium, Dodger Stadium and the Astrodome, that were pitcher's parks, which suppressed offensive production. Also, the increasing sophistication of training methods and sports medicine, such as Tommy John surgery, allowed players to maintain a high competitive level for a longer time. Randy Johnson, for example, won more games in his 40s than he did in his 20s.Since 1990, only four pitchers have joined the 300 win club: Roger Clemens, Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, and Johnson. Changes in the game in the last decade of the 20th century have made attaining 300 career wins difficult, perhaps more so than during the mid 20th century. The four-man starting rotation has given way to a five-man rotation, which gives starting pitchers fewer chances to pick up wins. No pitcher reached 20 wins in a non strike-shortened year for the first time in 2006; this was repeated in 2009 and 2017.Recording 300 career wins has been seen as a guaranteed admission to the Baseball Hall of Fame. All pitchers with 300 wins have been elected to the Hall of Fame except for Clemens, who received only half of the vote total needed for induction in his first appearance on the Hall of Fame ballot in 2013 and lost votes from that total in 2014. Clemens' future election is seen as uncertain because of his alleged links to use of performance-enhancing drugs. To be eligible for the Hall of Fame, a player must have "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least six months, Many observers expect the club to gain few, if any, members in the foreseeable future. Ten members of the 300 win club are also members of the 3,000 strikeout club.

Bert Blyleven

Bert Blyleven (born Rik Aalbert Blijleven, April 6, 1951) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who played from 1970 to 1992. A renowned curveball pitcher, Blyleven was a two-time All-Star and World Series champion. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2011. Currently, he is the color commentator for the Minnesota Twins on Fox Sports North.

CC Sabathia

Carsten Charles Sabathia Jr. (born July 21, 1980), commonly known as CC Sabathia, is an American professional baseball pitcher for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Cleveland Indians and Milwaukee Brewers. Sabathia bats and throws left-handed.

Sabathia made his major league debut with the Indians in 2001 and placed second in the 2001 AL Rookie of the Year voting behind 2001 AL MVP Ichiro Suzuki. Sabathia played the first seven-and-a-half seasons of his career with the Indians, with whom he won the 2007 Cy Young Award. He led the Indians to the 2007 AL Central Division title and their first postseason berth since his rookie year. Following a trade, Sabathia played the second half of the 2008 MLB season with the Milwaukee Brewers, helping them make the playoffs for the first time in 26 years.

In the 2008 offseason, Sabathia signed with the New York Yankees for seven years and $161 million; at the time, this was the largest contract ever signed by a pitcher. With the Yankees, Sabathia led all of Major League Baseball in wins in both 2009 and 2010 and won a World Series ring in 2009. He was also voted the 2009 American League Championship Series Most Valuable Player. After mid-career struggles attributed to lost fastball velocity, chronic knee injuries, and alcoholism, Sabathia again found success in the late 2010s after reinventing himself as a control pitcher. In February 2019, he announced that 2019 would be his final season as a professional baseball player.

During his career, Sabathia has been named an All-Star six times and has won the Warren Spahn Award three times. In August 2017, Sabathia became the all-time American League leader in strikeouts by a left-handed pitcher. As of June 2019, he leads all active Major League players in career wins, career innings pitched and career strikeouts. On April 30, 2019, he became the seventeenth pitcher in MLB history to reach 3,000 strikeouts and the third left-hander to do so (joining Randy Johnson and Steve Carlton).

Control pitcher

In baseball, a control pitcher, also known as a finesse pitcher, is a pitcher who succeeds mostly by using accurate pitches, as opposed to a power pitcher who relies on velocity. By issuing a below average number of bases on balls he exhibits good control of his pitches. Pitchers with good control are said to be able to throw all the pitches in their repertoire for strikes in different locations regardless of the batter, count and score. According to Curt Schilling, "Control is the ability to throw strikes, and command is the ability to throw quality strikes." Another definition of control is "The ability to deliver the ball to the plate with accuracy." The best control pitchers will walk as few as one batter per game. Control is also key to getting ahead in the count, and thus gaining the advantage over batters to keep them off base. Statistics used to measure control include:

Walks per nine innings

Strikeout-to-walk ratioControl pitchers, who succeed by avoiding surrendering walks, are different from power pitchers who succeed by striking out batters and keeping the ball out of play.

Three of the most famous examples of control pitchers in the history of baseball are Christy Mathewson, Ferguson Jenkins, and Greg Maddux, though Maddux and Jenkins have also had significant strikeout totals (they are members of the 3,000 strikeout club) because of their ability to change speeds and the deceptive nature of their pitches.

Curt Schilling

Curtis Montague Schilling (born November 14, 1966) is an American former Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher and currently a commentator for Blaze TV. He helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies to the World Series in 1993, and won championships in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks and in 2004 and 2007 with the Boston Red Sox. Schilling retired with a career postseason record of 11–2, and his .846 postseason winning percentage is a major-league record among pitchers with at least ten decisions. He is a member of the 3,000-strikeout club and has the highest strikeout-to-walk ratio of any of its members. He is tied for third for the most 300-strikeout seasons. Of post 19th century pitchers, Schilling has the second highest JAWS of any pitcher not in the Hall of Fame (behind only Roger Clemens).After retiring, he founded Green Monster Games, which was renamed 38 Studios. The company released Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning in February 2012. Three months later, they laid off their entire staff amid severe financial troubles.

As a radio-personality Schilling was signed by the Howie Carr radio network to do a Saturday morning politics and sports show. An outspoken conservative, Schilling joined Breitbart in 2016.

Ferguson Jenkins

Ferguson Arthur "Fergie" Jenkins CM (born December 13, 1942) is a Canadian former professional baseball pitcher and coach, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, Texas Rangers, and Boston Red Sox (1965–1983).

Jenkins played the majority of his career for the Cubs. He was a National League (NL) and Cubs All-Star for three seasons, and in 1971, he was the first Canadian and Cubs pitcher to win a Cy Young Award. He was a 20-game winner for seven seasons, including six consecutive seasons for the Cubs. He was the NL leader in wins, in 1971, and the American League (AL) leader in wins, in 1974. He was also the NL leader in complete games in 1967, 1970, and 1971, and the AL leader in complete games in 1974. He led the NL in strikeouts in 1969 and had over 3,000 strikeouts during his career.

Jenkins also played basketball in the off-season for the Harlem Globetrotters from 1967 to 1969, and pitched two seasons in Canada for the minor league London Majors following his major league career. In 1991, Jenkins became the first Canadian to be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Greg Maddux

Gregory Alan Maddux (born April 14, 1966) is an American former Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher. Maddux is best known for his accomplishments while playing for the Atlanta Braves and the Chicago Cubs. With the Braves, he won the 1995 World Series over the Cleveland Indians. The first to achieve a number of feats and records, he was the first pitcher in major league history to win the Cy Young Award for four consecutive years (1992–1995), matched by only one other pitcher, Randy Johnson. During those four seasons, Maddux had a 75–29 record with a 1.98 earned run average (ERA), while allowing less than one baserunner per inning.Maddux is the only pitcher in MLB history to win at least 15 games for 17 straight seasons. In addition, he holds the record for most Gold Gloves with 18. A superb control pitcher, Maddux won more games during the 1990s than any other pitcher and is 8th on the all-time career wins list with 355. Since the start of the post-1920 live-ball era, only Warren Spahn (363) recorded more career wins than Maddux. He is one of only 10 pitchers ever to achieve both 300 wins and 3,000 strikeouts, and is the only pitcher to record more than 300 wins, more than 3,000 strikeouts, and fewer than 1,000 walks.Since his retirement as a player, Maddux has also served as a special assistant to the general manager for both the Cubs and Texas Rangers. On January 8, 2014, he was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, in his first year of eligibility, receiving 97.2 percent of the votes.

List of Major League Baseball career strikeout leaders

In baseball, a strikeout occurs when the batter receives three strikes during his time at bat. Strikeouts are associated with dominance on the part of the pitcher and failure on the part of the batter.

Nolan Ryan has the most career strikeouts in Major League Baseball. During a record 27-year career, he struck out 5,714 batters.

The parentheses adjacent to an active player denote the number of strikeouts in the current season.

List of Major League Baseball pitchers who have thrown an immaculate inning

In baseball, a strikeout occurs when a pitcher throws three strikes to a batter during his time at bat. An immaculate inning occurs when a pitcher strikes out all three batters he faces in one inning, using the minimum possible number of pitches—nine. There have been 91 different pitchers that have struck out three batters on nine consecutive pitches in a half-inning of a Major League Baseball (MLB) game as of July 2019, a total of 98 times, the most recent being Stephen Strasburg of the Washington Nationals on July 3, 2019.

Six players have accomplished the feat more than once in their career, and no player has ever struck out four batters on twelve pitches in an inning. John Clarkson was the first player to strike out three batters on nine pitches, doing so in the third inning for the Boston Beaneaters against the Philadelphia Quakers on June 4, 1889..

Out of the 91 pitchers who have accomplished the feat, 69 were right-handed and 22 pitched left-handed. Eight of these players (including five active pitchers) have played for only one major league team. Four pitchers—Bob Gibson, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez and Nolan Ryan—are also members of the 3,000 strikeout club. Sloppy Thurston, Ryan, Wade Miley, and Thomas Pannone are the only rookies to have attained the milestone. Ryan struck out three batters on nine pitches in the American League and National League, becoming the only player to achieve the feat in both leagues of MLB. Danny Jackson is the sole player to pitch an immaculate inning in the World Series. Lefty Grove (1928) and Chris Sale (2019) are the only pitchers to record two immaculate innings in the same season. No pitcher has recorded three immaculate innings in a single year.

Of the 23 players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame who pitched an immaculate inning, thirteen have been elected and five were elected on the first ballot. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 major league seasons, and have either been retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months. These requirements leave 26 players ineligible who are active, four who are living and have played in the past five seasons, and eight who did not play in 10 major league seasons.

List of Major League Baseball single-game strikeout leaders

In baseball, a strikeout occurs when a pitcher throws three strikes to a batter during his time at bat. Twenty different pitchers have struck out at least 18 batters in a single nine-inning Major League Baseball (MLB) game as of 2016, the most recent being Max Scherzer of the Washington Nationals on May 11, 2016. Four players have accomplished the feat more than once in their career; no player has ever struck out more than 20 batters in a nine-inning game. Charlie Sweeney was the first player to strike out 18 batters in a single game, doing so for the Providence Grays against the Boston Beaneaters on June 7, 1884. In spite of this, Bob Feller is viewed as the first pitcher to accomplish the feat, since his then-record 18 strikeouts was the first to occur during the 20th century and the live-ball era.Out of the twenty pitchers who have accomplished the feat, fifteen were right-handed and five pitched left-handed. Five of these players have played for only one major league team. Five pitchers—Steve Carlton, Roger Clemens, Randy Johnson, Nolan Ryan and Tom Seaver—are also members of the 3,000 strikeout club. Sweeney has the fewest career strikeouts in the group with 505, while Nolan Ryan, with 5,714, struck out more batters than any other pitcher in major league history. Bill Gullickson and Kerry Wood are the only rookies to have achieved the feat. Tom Seaver concluded his milestone game by striking out the final ten batters he faced, setting a new major league record for most consecutive strikeouts.Of the eleven players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame who have struck out 18 batters in a game, six have been elected; all six were elected on the first ballot. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 major league seasons, and have either been retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months. These requirements leave two players ineligible who are active, two players ineligible who are living and have played in the past five seasons, and five who did not play in 10 major league seasons.

List of Major League Baseball single-inning strikeout leaders

In baseball, a strikeout occurs when a pitcher throws three strikes to a batter during his time at bat. Under Rules 6.05 and 6.09 of the Official Rules of Major League Baseball, a batter becomes a runner when a third strike is not caught by the catcher with no runner on first base or when there are two outs. The strikeout is recorded, but the batter-runner must be tagged or forced out in order for the defensive team to register the out. Thus, it is possible for a pitcher to record more than three strikeouts in an inning. As a result of this rule, 88 different pitchers have struck out four batters in a half-inning of a Major League Baseball (MLB) game as of June 1, 2019, the most recent being Luke Bard of the Los Angeles Angels on April 22, 2019. Four players — Chuck Finley, A. J. Burnett, Zack Greinke, and Craig Kimbrel — have accomplished the feat more than once in their career; no player has ever struck out more than four batters in an inning. Ed Crane was the first player to strike out four batters in one inning, doing so in the fifth inning for the New York Giants against the Chicago White Stockings on October 4, 1888.Out of the 88 pitchers who have accomplished the feat, 62 were right-handed and 20 were left-handed. Twenty-four of these players (including fifteen active pitchers) have played for only one major league team. Three pitchers—Bob Gibson, Walter Johnson and Phil Niekro—are also members of the 3,000 strikeout club. Finley is the only pitcher to achieve the feat on three separate occasions, as well as twice in a single season. Pete Richert struck out four batters in the third inning of his first major league game, becoming the only player to attain the milestone in his debut. Orval Overall is the sole player to strike out four batters in one inning in the World Series.Of the 26 players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame who have struck out four batters in an inning, four have been elected and two were elected on the first ballot. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 major league seasons, and have either been retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months. These requirements leave 26 players ineligible who are active, four who are living and have played in the past five seasons, and fourteen who did not play in 10 major league seasons.

List of Major League Baseball statistical clubs

In Major League Baseball (MLB), a player joins a statistical club when he attains a certain milestone number in a specific statistical category. For milestones that encompass an entire career, batters must achieve 3,000 hits or 500 home runs; pitchers must amass 300 wins or 3,000 strikeouts. A fifth club exists for relief pitchers that have recorded 300 saves over a career. In addition, milestones achieved in a single season include hitting 50 home runs, while three other single-season statistical clubs—the 20–20–20 club, 30–30 club and 40–40 club — include achievements from multiple statistical categories.

Reaching any one of the four career milestone clubs is often described as a guarantee of eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Randy Johnson

Randall David Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed "The Big Unit", is an American former professional baseball pitcher who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB), from 1988 to 2009, for six teams. He played primarily for the Seattle Mariners and Arizona Diamondbacks. His 303 career victories rank as the fifth-most by a left-hander in MLB history, while his 4,875 strikeouts place him second all-time behind Nolan Ryan and are the most by a left-hander. He holds five of the seven highest single-season strikeout totals by a left-hander in modern history. Johnson won the Cy Young Award five times, second only to Roger Clemens' seven, and he is one of only two pitchers (the other being Greg Maddux) to win the award in four consecutive seasons (1999–2002). In 1999, he joined Pedro Martínez and Gaylord Perry in the rare feat of winning the award in both the American and National Leagues (a feat since accomplished by Clemens, Roy Halladay, and Max Scherzer). He is also one of five pitchers to pitch no-hitters in both leagues. On May 18, 2004, at the age of forty, Johnson became the oldest pitcher in major league history to throw a perfect game, and is one of seven pitchers who have thrown both a perfect game and a no-hitter in their careers. He is also one of eighteen pitchers in history to record a win against all 30 MLB franchises. On May 8th 2001, Johnson achieved the feat of striking out 20 batters in one game, doing so against the Reds.

One of the tallest players in major league history at 6 feet 10 inches (2.08 m), and a ten-time All-Star, Johnson was celebrated for having one of the most dominant fastballs in the game. He regularly approached – and occasionally exceeded – 100 miles per hour (160 km/h), during his prime. Johnson also threw a hard, biting slider. After struggling early in his career (having won only 64 games by his 30th birthday), he went on to lead his league in strikeouts nine times, and in earned run average, winning percentage, and complete games four times each. Johnson was named one of two (along with Curt Schilling) World Series Most Valuable Players in 2001, with three pitching victories, leading the Diamondbacks to a world championship over the New York Yankees in only Arizona’s fourth year of play. He won the pitching Triple Crown in 2002.

Johnson's .646 career winning percentage ranks sixth among lefthanders with at least 200 decisions; among southpaws, he ranks eighth in games started (603) and ninth in innings pitched (​4,135 1⁄3). Johnson’s career elite rankings also include: first in strikeouts per nine innings pitched (10.67), third in hit batsmen (188), and tenth in fewest hits allowed per nine innings pitched (7.24). He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2015, his first year of eligibility, and is the first member of the Hall to be depicted in a Diamondbacks uniform on his plaque.

Steve Carlton

Steven Norman Carlton (born December 22, 1944), nicknamed "Lefty", is a former Major League Baseball left-handed pitcher. He pitched from 1965 to 1988 for six different teams in his career, but it is his time with the Philadelphia Phillies where he received his greatest acclaim as a professional and won four Cy Young Awards. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1994.

Carlton has the second-most lifetime strikeouts of any left-handed pitcher (4th overall), and the second-most lifetime wins of any left-handed pitcher (11th overall). He was the first pitcher to win four Cy Young Awards in a career. He held the lifetime strikeout record several times between 1982 and 1984, before his contemporary Nolan Ryan passed him. One of his most remarkable records was accounting for nearly half (46%) of his team's wins, when he won 27 games for the last-place (59-97) 1972 Phillies. He is the last National League pitcher to win 25 or more games in one season, as well as the last pitcher from any team to throw more than 300 innings in a season. He also holds the record with the most career balks of any pitcher, with 90 (double the second on the all-time list, Bob Welch).

Strikeout

In baseball or softball, a strikeout (or strike-out) occurs when a batter racks up three strikes during a time at bat. It usually means the batter is out. A strikeout is a statistic recorded for both pitchers and batters, and is denoted by K. A strikeout looking is denoted by a ꓘ.Although a strikeout suggests that the pitcher dominated the batter, the free-swinging style that generates home runs also leaves batters susceptible to striking out. Some of the greatest home run hitters of all time – such as Alex Rodriguez, Reggie Jackson, and Sammy Sosa – were notorious for striking out.

Tom Seaver

George Thomas Seaver (born November 17, 1944), nicknamed Tom Terrific and The Franchise, is a retired American professional baseball pitcher. He pitched in Major League Baseball (MLB) from 1967 to 1986 for the New York Mets, Cincinnati Reds, Chicago White Sox, and Boston Red Sox. He played a role in the Mets' victory in the 1969 World Series.

With the Mets, Seaver won the National League (NL)'s Rookie of the Year Award in 1967, and won three NL Cy Young Awards as the league's best pitcher. He is a 12-time All-Star. Seaver is the Mets' all-time leader in wins, and he threw a no-hitter in 1978. During a 20-year MLB career, Seaver compiled 311 wins, 3,640 strikeouts, 61 shutouts and a 2.86 earned run average.

In 1992, Seaver was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame by the highest percentage of votes ever recorded at the time. He is one of two players wearing a New York Mets hat on his plaque in the Hall of Fame. He is also a member of the New York Mets Hall of Fame and the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. In 2019, the Mets renamed 126th Street in front of Citi Field to Seaver Way. The stadium's address is now 41 Seaver Way, a tribute to the No. 41 that Seaver wore during his career.

Walter Johnson

Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887 – December 10, 1946), nicknamed "Barney" and "The Big Train", was a Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. He played his entire 21-year baseball career for the Washington Senators (1907–1927). He later served as manager of the Senators from 1929 through 1932 and of the Cleveland Indians from 1933 through 1935.Often thought of as one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history, Johnson established several pitching records, some of which remain unbroken nine decades after he retired from baseball. He remains by far the all-time career leader in shutouts with 110, second in wins with 417, and fourth in complete games with 531. He held the career record in strikeouts for nearly 56 years, with 3,508, from the end of his career in 1927 until the 1983 season, when three players (Steve Carlton, Nolan Ryan and Gaylord Perry) finally passed the mark. Johnson was the only player in the 3,000 strikeout club (achieved 22 July 1923) for 51 years (less 5 days) until Bob Gibson recorded his 3,000th strikeout on 17 July 1974. Johnson led the league in strikeouts a Major League record twelve times—one more than current strikeout leader Nolan Ryan—including a record eight consecutive seasons. He is the only pitcher in major league history to record over 400 wins and strikeout over 3,500 batters.

In 1936, Johnson was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members. His gentle nature was legendary, and to this day he is held up as an example of good sportsmanship, while his name has become synonymous with friendly competition.

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