3,000 hit club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 3,000 hit club is the group of batters who have collected 3,000 or more regular-season hits in their careers. Cap Anson was the first to join the club on July 18, 1897, although his precise career hit total is unclear.[a] Two players—Nap Lajoie and Honus Wagner—reached 3,000 hits during the 1914 season. Ty Cobb became the club's fourth member in 1921 and became the first player in MLB history to reach 4,000 hits in 1927; he ultimately finished his career with 4,191.[7][b] Pete Rose became the second player to reach 4,000 hits on April 13, 1984 while playing for the Montreal Expos.[11] Cobb, also the major leagues' all-time career batting average leader, remained the MLB hit leader until September 11, 1985, when Rose collected his 4,192nd hit.[12] Rose, the current record holder, finished his career with 4,256 hits. Roberto Clemente's career ended with precisely 3,000 hits, reaching the mark in the last at bat of his career on September 30, 1972.[13][14][c]

In total, 32 players have reached the 3,000 hit mark in MLB history. Of these, 17 were right-handed batters, 13 were left-handed, and two were switch hitters, meaning they could bat from either side of the plate. Ten of these players have played for only one major league team. Six players—Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Eddie Murray, Rafael Palmeiro, Albert Pujols and Alex Rodriguez—are also members of the 500 home run club. At .367, Cobb holds the highest career batting average among club members, while Cal Ripken Jr. holds the lowest at .276. Rodriguez, Derek Jeter, and Wade Boggs are the only players to hit a home run for their 3,000th hit and Paul Molitor and Ichiro Suzuki are the only players to hit a triple for their 3,000th; all others hit a single or double. Craig Biggio was thrown out at second base attempting to stretch his 3,000th hit, a single, into a double.[17] Biggio and Jeter are the only players whose 3,000th hit came in a game where they had five hits; Jeter reached base safely in all of his at bats.[18] The most recent player to join the club is Pujols, who collected his 3,000th hit on May 4, 2018, while playing for the Los Angeles Angels.[19]

Baseball writer Josh Pahigian writes that reaching 3,000 hits has been "long considered the greatest measure of superior bat handling", and it is often described as a guarantee of eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame.[20][21][22][23] All eligible players with 3,000 or more career hits with the exception of Palmeiro, whose career has been tainted by steroid allegations, have been elected to the Hall, and since 1962 all who have been inducted were elected on the first ballot, except for Biggio. Rose is ineligible for the Hall of Fame because he was permanently banned from baseball in 1989.[24][25] After four years on the ballot, Palmeiro failed to be named on 5% of ballots in 2014, and accordingly his name was removed from the Baseball Writers' Association of America ballot for future elections, although it is possible that the Veterans Committee could select him.[26] Twenty-one different teams have had a player reach 3,000 hits.

Pete Rose 2008
Pete Rose is the all-time MLB hits leader with 4,256 hits

Key

Cap anson studio photo
Cap Anson reached 3,000 hits on July 18, 1897, and was the first player to do so.
Ty-Cobb-1913-NPC-detail-1.jpeg
In 1927, Ty Cobb became the first player to collect 4,000 hits.
Paul Molitor white house
Paul Molitor was the first to triple for his 3,000th hit.
Derek Jeter and Dave Winfield
Derek Jeter (left) and Dave Winfield (right) are both members.
Albert Pujols (36564529721) (cropped)
Albert Pujols is the most recent member of the 3,000 hit club.
Player Name of the player
Hits Career hits
Average Career batting average
Date Date of the player's 3,000th hit
Team The batter's team for his 3,000th hit
Seasons The seasons this player played in the major leagues
3,000th hit The type of hit the batter recorded for his 3,000th hit
dagger Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame
double-dagger Player is active

Members

Statistics are updated through October 1, 2018.
Player Hits Average Date Team Seasons 3,000th hit Ref
Pete Rose 4,256 .303 May 5, 1978 Cincinnati Reds 1963–1986 Single [27]
Ty Cobbdagger 4,191[b] .367 August 19, 1921 Detroit Tigers 1905–1928 [10]
Hank Aarondagger 3,771 .305 May 17, 1970 Atlanta Braves 1954–1976 [28]
Stan Musialdagger 3,630 .331 May 13, 1958 St. Louis Cardinals 1941–1944, 1946–1963 Double [29]
Tris Speakerdagger 3,514 .345 May 17, 1925 Cleveland Indians 1907–1928 Single [30]
Derek Jeter 3,465 .310 July 9, 2011 New York Yankees 1995–2014 Home run [31]
Honus Wagnerdagger 3,430 .329 June 9, 1914 Pittsburgh Pirates 1897–1917 Double [32]
Carl Yastrzemskidagger 3,419 .285 September 12, 1979 Boston Red Sox 1961–1983 Single [33]
Paul Molitordagger 3,319 .306 September 16, 1996 Minnesota Twins 1978–1998 Triple [34]
Eddie Collinsdagger 3,314 .333 June 3, 1925 Chicago White Sox 1906–1930 Single [35]
Willie Maysdagger 3,283 .302 July 18, 1970 San Francisco Giants 1951–1952, 1954–1973 [36]
Eddie Murraydagger 3,255 .287 June 30, 1995 Cleveland Indians 1977–1997 [37]
Nap Lajoiedagger 3,252[d] .339 September 27, 1914 Cleveland Naps 1896–1916 Double [39]
Cal Ripken Jr.dagger 3,184 .276 April 15, 2000 Baltimore Orioles 1981–2001 Single [41]
Adrián Beltré 3,166 .286 July 30, 2017 Texas Rangers 1998–2018 Double [42]
George Brettdagger 3,154 .305 September 30, 1992 Kansas City Royals 1973–1993 Single [43]
Paul Wanerdagger 3,152 .333 June 19, 1942 Boston Braves 1926–1945 [44]
Robin Yountdagger 3,142 .285 September 9, 1992 Milwaukee Brewers 1974–1993 [45]
Tony Gwynndagger 3,141 .338 August 6, 1999 San Diego Padres 1982–2001 [46]
Alex Rodriguez 3,115 .295 June 19, 2015 New York Yankees 1994–2013, 2015–2016 Home run [47]
Dave Winfielddagger 3,110 .283 September 16, 1993 Minnesota Twins 1973–1995 Single [48]
Ichiro Suzukidouble-dagger 3,089 .311 August 7, 2016 Miami Marlins 2001–present Triple [49]
Albert Pujolsdouble-dagger 3,082 .302 May 4, 2018 Los Angeles Angels 2001–present Single [50]
Craig Biggiodagger 3,060 .281 June 28, 2007 Houston Astros 1988–2007 [51]
Rickey Hendersondagger 3,055 .279 October 7, 2001 San Diego Padres 1979–2003 Double [52]
Rod Carewdagger 3,053 .328 August 4, 1985 California Angels 1967–1985 Single [53]
Lou Brockdagger 3,023 .293 August 13, 1979 St. Louis Cardinals 1961–1979 [54]
Rafael Palmeiro 3,020 .288 July 15, 2005 Baltimore Orioles 1986–2005 Double [55]
Cap Ansondagger 3,011[a] .331 July 18, 1897[a] Chicago Colts 1871–1897 Single [6]
Wade Boggsdagger 3,010 .328 August 7, 1999 Tampa Bay Devil Rays 1982–1999 Home run [56]
Al Kalinedagger 3,007 .297 September 24, 1974 Detroit Tigers 1953–1974 Double [57]
Roberto Clementedagger 3,000 .317 September 30, 1972 Pittsburgh Pirates 1955–1972 [58]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c Two major factors have confused Anson's precise hit total. First, a rule which existed for only the 1887 MLB season counted walks as hits.[1] Additionally, Anson played five seasons in the National Association (NA), which is not always recognized as an official "major league".[1][2] MLB.com credits Anson with 3,011 career hits, not including his time in the NA or his walks in 1887.[3] Baseball-Reference credits him with 3,435 hits, including his time in the NA, not including his walks in 1887, and differing with MLB.com over his hit total in 1894.[4] The Hall of Fame shows 3,081 hits for Anson, including his walks in 1887 (for a total of 224 hits that season) but not including NA playing time.[5] Elias Sports Bureau also credits him with 3,081 hits.[6] The date listed comes from MLB.com, using their hit totals for Anson.
  2. ^ a b MLB.com and the Hall of Fame credit Cobb with 4,191 hits,[8][9] while Baseball-Reference lists 4,189.[10]
  3. ^ This was not Clemente's last game, however, as he entered his next and final game as a defensive substitution and did not bat.[13][15] Clemente died during the following offseason on December 31, 1972.[16]
  4. ^ MLB.com credits Lajoie with 3,252 hits,[38] while Baseball-Reference and the 3,000 hit club page on MLB.com list 3,243 and 3,242, respectively.[39][40]

References

General
  • "Career Leaders & Records for Hits". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  • "3,000 Hits Club – Milestones". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Archived from the original on June 24, 2010. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  • "The 3,000 Hit Club". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on March 25, 2010. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
Specific
  1. ^ a b Fleitz, David L. (2005). Cap Anson: The Grand Old Man of Baseball. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. p. 346. ISBN 0-7864-2238-6.
  2. ^ "Complete Baseball Team and Baseball Team Encyclopedias". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Archived from the original on August 8, 2010. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  3. ^ "Cap Anson – Historical Player Stats". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  4. ^ "Cap Anson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  5. ^ "Anson, Cap". baseballhall.org. Baseball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on June 22, 2010. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  6. ^ a b "The 3,000 Hit Club: Cap Anson". Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved November 24, 2016.
  7. ^ "Progressive Leaders & Records for Hits". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  8. ^ "Ty Cobb Stats, Bio, Photos, Highlights". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  9. ^ "Cobb, Ty". baseballhall.org. Baseball Hall of Fame. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  10. ^ a b "Ty Cobb Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  11. ^ Constantino, Rocco (2016). 50 Moments That Defined Major League Baseball. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 27–28. ISBN 978-1-4422-6055-9.
  12. ^ Boswell, Thomas (September 12, 1985). "'Charlie Hustle' gets hit 4,192 to surpass Cobb, then another". The Washington Post.
  13. ^ a b "Roberto Clemente 1972 Batting Gamelogs". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  14. ^ "September 30, 1972 New York Mets at Pittsburgh Pirates Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  15. ^ "October 3, 1972 St. Louis Cardinals at Pittsburgh Pirates Play by Play and Box Score". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  16. ^ Schwartz, Larry. "Clemente quietly grew in stature". ESPN.com. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  17. ^ "Houston's Biggio lashes 3,000th: 'Tonight is the best'". USA Today. Associated Press. June 29, 2007. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  18. ^ Marchand, Andrew (July 9, 2011). "Derek Jeter gets 3,000th hit". ESPN.com. Retrieved July 9, 2011.
  19. ^ Guardado, Maria (May 4, 2018). "Breaking: Pujols joins 3,000-hit club". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved May 4, 2018.
  20. ^ Pahigian, Josh (2010). The Seventh Inning Stretch: Baseball's Most Essential and Inane Debates. Guilford, Connecticut: Globe Pequot Press. p. 80. ISBN 978-1-59921-805-2.
  21. ^ Bloom, Barry M. (April 27, 2005). "Hoffman definitely Hall of Fame caliber". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media, L.P. Archived from the original on April 21, 2011. There are milestones in other areas that always have been instant Hall of Fame qualifiers: 3,000 hits, 500 homers and 300 wins.
  22. ^ Haudricourt, Tom (November 1999). "Hall of Fame File". Baseball Digest: 75.
  23. ^ Chass, Murray (April 16, 2000). "Baseball; Ripken Gets One More Big Number: 3,000 hits". The New York Times. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  24. ^ "Rules for Election". National Baseball Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on May 30, 2010. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  25. ^ Erardi, John (August 23, 2009). "What is Pete Rose's true legacy?". The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  26. ^ "2014 Hall of Fame Voting". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved February 17, 2014.
  27. ^ "Pete Rose Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  28. ^ "Hank Aaron Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  29. ^ "Stan Musial Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  30. ^ "Tris Speaker Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 14, 2010.
  31. ^ "Derek Jeter Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Archived from the original on June 29, 2011. Retrieved July 9, 2011.
  32. ^ "Honus Wagner Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  33. ^ "Carl Yastrzemski Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  34. ^ "Paul Molitor Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  35. ^ "Eddie Collins Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  36. ^ "Willie Mays Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  37. ^ "Eddie Murray Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  38. ^ "Nap Lajoie Stats, Bio, Photos, Highlights". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 23, 2012.
  39. ^ a b "Nap Lajoie Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  40. ^ "3,000 Hits Club – Milestones". MLB.com. Major League Baseball. Archived from the original on June 24, 2010. Retrieved October 5, 2012.
  41. ^ "Cal Ripken Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  42. ^ "Adrian Beltre Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved September 29, 2018.
  43. ^ "George Brett Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  44. ^ "Paul Waner Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  45. ^ "Robin Yount Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  46. ^ "Tony Gwynn Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  47. ^ "Alex Rodriguez Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved June 19, 2015.
  48. ^ "Dave Winfield Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  49. ^ "Ichiro Suzuki Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved August 7, 2016.
  50. ^ "Albert Pujols Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved May 5, 2018.
  51. ^ "Craig Biggio Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  52. ^ "Rickey Henderson Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  53. ^ "Rod Carew Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  54. ^ "Lou Brock Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  55. ^ "Rafael Palmeiro Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  56. ^ "Wade Boggs Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  57. ^ "Al Kaline Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 4, 2010.
  58. ^ "Roberto Clemente Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 30, 2017.
1974 Detroit Tigers season

The 1974 Detroit Tigers compiled a record of 72–90. They finished in last place in the American League East, 19 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. They were outscored by their opponents 768 to 620.

1979 Boston Red Sox season

The 1979 Boston Red Sox season was the 79th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League East with a record of 91 wins and 69 losses, 11½ games behind the Baltimore Orioles.

20–20–20 club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 20–20–20 club is the group of batters who have collected 20 doubles, 20 triples and 20 home runs in a single season. Frank Schulte was the first to achieve this, doing so in 1911. The last players to reach the milestone—Curtis Granderson and Jimmy Rollins—attained 20–20–20 during the 2007 season. This marked the first time that two players accomplished the achievement in the same season.

In total, only seven players are members of the 20–20–20 club. Of these, five were left-handed batters, one was right-handed and one was a switch hitter, meaning he could bat from either side of the plate. Two players—George Brett and Willie Mays—are also members of the 3,000 hit club, and Mays is also a member of the 500 home run club. Schulte, Rollins, and Jim Bottomley won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in the same year as their 20–20–20 season. Both Mays and Rollins joined the club while also hitting 30 home runs and stealing 30 bases that same season to join the 30–30 club. Brett and Rollins collected more than 200 hits alongside achieving 20–20–20. Furthermore, four players amassed 20 or more stolen bases during their 20–20–20 season. These players are collectively referred to as the 20–20–20–20 club.Historically, there have been numerous players who have hit 20 doubles and 20 home runs in a year. It is the component of triples, however, that makes the 20–20–20 club so difficult to achieve. This is because hitting triples often comes under a similar hit placement as doubles, but may require impressive speed on the part of the runner. This would pose a challenge for both a slugger, who may be slower at running the bases and have the tendency to hit line drives and fly balls out of the park for a home run, as well as a speedster, who may be more swift around the bases but may not supply much power to drive the ball far.

Due to the rare occurrence and low membership of the 20–20–20 club, Baseball Digest called it "the most exclusive club in the Majors" in 1979, when there were only four members. Of the five members eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame, three have been elected and two were elected on the first ballot.

3000

3000 most often refers to:

3000 (number), the number three thousand

3000 (year), the last year of the 30th century

3000 (dinghy), a racing sailing dinghy

3,000 hit club, Major League Baseball batters with 3,000 hits

3000 metres, a track running event

André 3000, American singer and actor

30–30 club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 30–30 club is the group of batters who have collected 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases in a single season. Ken Williams was the first to achieve this, doing so in 1922. He remained the sole member of the club for 34 years until Willie Mays achieved consecutive 30–30 seasons in 1956 and 1957. Bobby Bonds became the club's fourth member in 1969 and became the first player in MLB history to reach the 30–30 club on three occasions and ultimately on five occasions, subsequently achieving the milestone in 1973, 1975, 1977 and 1978. He remained the only player to accomplish this until 1997, when his son Barry Bonds achieved his fifth 30–30 season. The most recent players to reach the milestone are José Ramírez and Mookie Betts, who achieved the feat during the 2018 season.

In total, 40 players have reached the 30–30 club in MLB history and 13 have done so more than once. Of these 40 players, 27 were right-handed batters, eight were left-handed and five were switch hitters, meaning they could bat from either side of the plate. The Cincinnati Reds, Cleveland Indians, Colorado Rockies and New York Mets are the only franchises to have three players reach the milestone. Five players—Hank Aaron, Barry Bonds, Willie Mays, Alex Rodriguez and Sammy Sosa—are also members of the 500 home run club, and Aaron, Mays and Rodriguez are also members of the 3,000 hit club. Dale Murphy, Jose Canseco, Barry Bonds, Larry Walker, Jimmy Rollins, Braun and Betts won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in the same year as their 30–30 season, with Bonds achieving this on two occasions (1990 and 1992). Both Mays and Rollins also reached the 20–20–20 club in the same season. Four different players accomplished 30–30 seasons in 1987, 1996, 1997 and 2011, the most in a single season.Due to the rarity of a player excelling in the combination of hitting home runs and stealing bases, Baseball Digest called the 30–30 club "the most celebrated feat that can be achieved by a player who has both power and speed." Of the 22 members eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame, five have been elected and two were elected on the first ballot. Eligibility requires that a player has "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least six months, disqualifying nine active players and six players who have been retired for less than five seasons.

500 home run club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 500 home run club is a group of batters who have hit 500 or more regular-season home runs in their careers. On August 11, 1929, Babe Ruth became the first member of the club. Ruth ended his career with 714 home runs, a record which stood from 1935 until Hank Aaron surpassed it in 1974. Aaron's ultimate career total, 755, remained the record until Barry Bonds set the current mark of 762 during the 2007 season. Twenty-seven players are members of the 500 home run club. Ted Williams (.344) holds the highest batting average among the club members while Harmon Killebrew (.256) holds the lowest.

Of these 27 players, 14 were right-handed batters, 11 were left-handed, and 2 were switch hitters. The San Francisco Giants and Boston Red Sox are the only franchises to see four players reach the milestone while on their roster: for the Giants, Mel Ott while the team was in New York, Willie Mays, Willie McCovey, and most recently Bonds, and, for the Red Sox, Jimmie Foxx, Williams, and more recently Manny Ramirez and David Ortiz. Six 500 home run club members—Aaron, Mays, Eddie Murray, Rafael Palmeiro, Albert Pujols, and Alex Rodriguez—are also members of the 3,000 hit club. Gary Sheffield's 500th home run was his first career home run with the New York Mets, the first time that a player's 500th home run was also his first with his franchise. Rodriguez, at 32 years and 8 days, was the youngest player to reach the milestone while Williams, at 41 years and 291 days, was the oldest. The most recent player to reach 500 home runs is Ortiz, who hit his 500th home run on September 12, 2015. As of the end of the 2018 season, Albert Pujols is the only active member of the 500 home run club.Membership in the 500 home run club is sometimes described as a guarantee of eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame, although some believe the milestone has become less meaningful in recent years. Five eligible club members—Bonds, Mark McGwire, Palmeiro, Sheffield and Sammy Sosa—have not been elected to the Hall. Bonds and Sosa made their first appearance on the Hall of Fame ballot in 2013; Bonds received only 36.2% and Sosa 12.5% of the total votes, with 75% required for induction. Eligibility requires that a player has "been retired five seasons" or be deceased for at least six months. Some believe the milestone has become less important with the large number of new members; 10 players joined the club from 1999 to 2009. Additionally, several of these recent members have had ties to performance-enhancing drugs. Some believe that by not electing McGwire to the Hall the voters were establishing a "referendum" on how they would treat players from the "Steroid Era". On January 8, 2014, Palmeiro became the first member of the 500 Home Run Club to be removed from the BBWAA Hall of Fame ballot. As the BBWAA announced the selections for the Baseball Hall of Fame Class of 2014, Palmeiro appeared on just 4.4% of the ballots. Players must be named on at least of 5.0% of ballots to remain on future ballots.

50 home run club

In Major League Baseball (MLB), the 50 home run club is the group of batters who have hit 50 or more home runs in a single season. Babe Ruth was the first to achieve this, doing so in 1920. By reaching the milestone, he also became the first player to hit 30 and then 40 home runs in a single-season, breaking his own record of 29 from the 1919 season. Ruth subsequently became the first player to reach the 50 home run club on four occasions, repeating the achievement in 1921, 1927 and 1928. He remained the only player to accomplish this until Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa matched his feat in 1999 and 2001, respectively, thus becoming the only players to achieve four consecutive 50 home run seasons. Barry Bonds hit the most home runs to join the club, collecting 73 in 2001. The most recent players to reach the milestone are Giancarlo Stanton and Aaron Judge, achieving the feat during the 2017 season.In total, 29 players have reached the 50 home run club in MLB history and nine have done so more than once. Of these, seventeen were right-handed batters, eleven were left-handed, and one was a switch hitter, meaning he could bat from either side of the plate. Four of these players (including two active members of the 50 home run club) have played for only one major league team. The New York Yankees are the only franchise to have five players reach the milestone while on their roster: Ruth, Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, Alex Rodriguez, and Judge. Ten players are also members of the 500 home run club and two of them (Willie Mays and Rodriguez) are also members of the 3,000 hit club. Ten players won the Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in the same year as their 50 home run season. Mantle is the only player to have earned the Major League Triple Crown alongside achieving 50 home runs, leading both leagues in batting average, home runs and runs batted in (RBI). Mantle and Maris—collectively known as the M&M Boys—are the only teammates to reach the 50 home run club in the same season, hitting a combined 115 home runs in 1961 and breaking the single-season record for home runs by a pair of teammates. Albert Belle is the only player to amass 50 or more doubles in addition to attaining 50 home runs. Prince Fielder, at 23 years and 139 days, was the youngest player to reach the milestone while Bonds, at age 37, was the oldest.Due to the infrequent addition of members into the 50 home run club, Baseball Digest called it "a restrictive fraternity comprising slugging elite" in 1954, when there were only six members. Of the seventeen members eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame, eight have been elected and three were elected on the first ballot. Eligibility requires that a player has "been retired five seasons" or deceased for at least six months, disqualifying four active players and five players who have been retired for less than five seasons. Some believe the milestone has become less important with the large number of new members; fifteen players joined the club on a total of 24 occasions from 1995 to 2010. Additionally, several of these recent members have had ties to performance-enhancing drugs.

Carl Yastrzemski

Carl Michael Yastrzemski (; nicknamed "Yaz"; born August 22, 1939) is an American former Major League Baseball player. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1989. Yastrzemski played his entire 23-year Major League career with the Boston Red Sox (1961–1983). He was primarily a left fielder, but also played 33 games as a third baseman and mostly was a first baseman and designated hitter later in his career. Yastrzemski is an 18-time All-Star, the possessor of seven Gold Gloves, a member of the 3,000 hit club, and the first American League player in that club to also accumulate over 400 home runs. He is second on the all-time list for games played, and third for total at-bats. He is the Red Sox' all-time leader in career RBIs, runs, hits, singles, doubles, total bases, and games played, and is third on the team's list for home runs behind Ted Williams and David Ortiz.In 1967 Yastrzemski achieved a peak in his career, leading the Red Sox to the American League pennant for the first time in over two decades and being voted the 1967 American League MVP. Yastrzemski also won the Triple Crown that year, a milestone which was not accomplished again in the Major Leagues until Miguel Cabrera achieved the feat 45 years later in 2012.

Craig Biggio

Craig Alan Biggio (; born December 14, 1965) is an American former second baseman, outfielder and catcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career from 1988 through 2007 for the Houston Astros. A seven-time National League (NL) All-Star often regarded as the greatest all-around player in Astros history, he is the only player ever to be named an All-Star at both catcher and second base. With longtime teammates Jeff Bagwell and Lance Berkman, he formed the core of the "Killer B's" who led Houston to six playoff appearances from 1997 to 2005, culminating in the franchise's first World Series appearance in 2005. At the end of his career he ranked sixth in NL history in games played (2,850), fifth in at bats (10,876), eighth in hits (3,060) and seventh in runs scored (1,844). His 668 career doubles ranked fifth in major league history, and are the most ever by a right-handed hitter; his 56 doubles in 1999 were the most in the major leagues in 63 years.

Biggio, who batted .300 four times and scored 100 runs eight times, holds Astros franchise records for most career games, at bats, hits, runs scored, doubles, total bases (4,711) and extra base hits (1,014), and ranks second in runs batted in (1,175), walks (1,160) and stolen bases (414). He also holds the NL record for most times leading off a game with a home run (53), and is one of only five players with 250 home runs and 400 steals. A four-time Gold Glove Award winner who led NL second basemen in assists six times and putouts five times, he retired ranking fourth in NL history in games at second base (1,989), sixth in assists (5,448) and fielding percentage (.984), seventh in putouts (3,992) and double plays (1,153), and eighth in total chances (9,596). He was the ninth player in the 3,000 hit club to collect all his hits with one team. Biggio also led the NL in times hit by pitch five times, with his career total of 285 trailing only Hughie Jennings' 287 in major league history.

One of the most admired players of his generation, Biggio received the 2005 Hutch Award for perseverance through adversity and the 2007 Roberto Clemente Award for sportsmanship and community service. The Astros retired the number 7 in his honor the year following his retirement. Since 2008, Biggio has served as special assistant to the general manager of the Astros. He was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2015, and is the first member of the Hall to be depicted in an Astros uniform on his plaque.

Eddie Collins

Edward Trowbridge Collins Sr. (May 2, 1887 – March 25, 1951), nicknamed "Cocky", was an American professional baseball player, manager and executive. He played as a second baseman in Major League Baseball from 1906 to 1930 for the Philadelphia Athletics and Chicago White Sox. A graduate of Columbia University, Collins holds major league career records in several categories and is among the top few players in several other categories. In 1925, Collins became just the sixth person to join the 3,000 hit club – and the last for the next 17 seasons.Collins coached and managed in the major leagues after retiring as a player. He also served as general manager of the Boston Red Sox. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

George Digby (baseball scout)

George J. Digby (August 31, 1917 – May 2, 2014) was an American baseball scout and consultant in Major League Baseball.

A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Digby started his professional career in 1944. He was coaching high school baseball in his homeland when a Boston Red Sox executive came to sign his best pitcher, Dick Callahan.

Digby helped young Callahan drive a hard bargain. The Red Sox paid out and, on the way to the train, also offered Digby a job.After that, Digby worked in the Boston organization for more than 60 years, half a century as a scout, 14 more as a consultant. Throughout the years, he traveled the South looking raw talent for the Red Sox. Among his finds were Red Sox graduates Tom Bolton, Steve Curry, Mike Greenwell, Jody Reed and Marc Sullivan. But Digby put great emphasis on signing future Hall of Famer Wade Boggs, after the Red Sox had reports that questioned Boggs' ability to be a Major League player, as he fought hard to convince the team that should draft the young man with the smooth swing. Finally, in 1976 Digby drafted Boggs in the seventh round and signed him for $7,500 and a college scholarship. In 1999, Digby saw Boggs belt a home run for his 3,000th career-hit, to become the first player in Major League history to enter the 3,000 hit club by hitting a home run. Boggs had invited Digby, all expenses paid.In 1948, one year after Jackie Robinson broke the baseball barrier in the Majors, the Birmingham Barons of the Southern Association were an affiliate team of the Red Sox who played at Rickwood Field in Alabama. The Barons, an all-white squad, shared the same field with the Birmingham Black Barons, an all-black team of the Negro leagues. At that time Digby spotted Willie Mays, by then a 17-year-old outfielder. Boston signed the Barons' player/manager Lorenzo ″Piper″ Davis for $15,000.Digby has served as role model, inspiration, catalyst and friend for many young scouts. The George Digby Award was created by the Red Sox in honour of Digby, to recognize annually the scout that has provided outstanding services for the organization.

In 2008 Digby was selected for induction into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, becoming the first scout to gain the honors. Digby is also in the Florida Scouts Hall of Fame. He was inducted in 2000 and his plaque is near the press box at Tropicana Field. The plaque shows that he has signed 53 Major League players.

Digby died on May 2, 2014, aged 96.

List of 1993 Seattle Mariners draft picks

The following is a list of 1993 Seattle Mariners draft picks. The Mariners took part in the June regular draft, also known as the Rule 4 draft. The Mariners made 69 selections in the 1993 draft, the first being shortstop Alex Roidriguez, now in the 3,000 hit club, in the first round. In all, the Mariners selected 37 pitchers, 13 outfielders, 7 catchers, 6 shortstops, 2 first basemen, 2 second basemen, and 2 third basemen.

List of Chicago Cubs first-round draft picks

The Chicago Cubs are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Chicago, Illinois. They play in the National League Central division. Since the institution of MLB's Rule 4 Draft, the Cubs have selected 60 players in the first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is MLB's primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs to its teams. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks.Of the 60 players picked in the first round by the Cubs, 30 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 24 of these were right-handed, while 6 were left-handed. Sixteen players picked in the initial round were outfielders, while eight shortstops, two catchers, and one player each at first base, second base, and third base were also taken. The Cubs drafted 25 players out of high school, and 32 out of college. Chicago has drafted eleven players from high schools or colleges in the state of California, with six more coming from Texas and five from Indiana. The Cubs have also taken three players from their home state of Illinois.The Cubs' most recent World Series championship, in 2016, was the team's first in 108 years. Four of the Cubs' first-round draft picks—Javier Báez (2011), Albert Almora (2012), Kris Bryant (2013), and Kyle Schwarber (2014)—were on the 2016 World Series roster. No pick has been elected to the Hall of Fame. Bryant is the Cubs' only first-round pick to be named Most Valuable Player in either the National or American League, winning NL honors in 2016. He is also one of two picks to have been named NL Rookie of the Year with the Cubs, receiving this award in 2015; the other is Kerry Wood, selected in 1995 and named Rookie of the Year in 1998. One pick—1985 selection Rafael Palmeiro—is a member of both the 3,000 hit club and the 500 home run club. The Cubs have held the first overall pick in the draft only once, in 1982, when they selected Shawon Dunston.The Cubs have received 13 compensatory picks, including nine selections made in the supplemental round of the draft since the institution of the First-Year Player Draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the previous off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. As the Cubs have signed all of their first-round picks, they have never been awarded a supplementary pick under this provision.

List of Houston Astros first-round draft picks

The Houston Astros, originally called the "Colt .45s", are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Houston, Texas. They play in the American League West division. Since the institution of Major League Baseball's Rule 4 Draft, the Astros have selected 56 players in the first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is Major League Baseball's primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs to its franchises. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, and the team that had the worst record receives the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks. The First-Year Player Draft is unrelated to the 1961 expansion draft in which the Astros initially filled their roster.

Of the 56 players picked in the first round by Houston, 24 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 21 of these were right-handed, while 3 were left-handed. Nine catchers were selected, while nine outfielders, nine shortstops, two first basemen, and two third basemen were taken as well. The team also selected one player at second base. Thirteen of the players came from high schools or universities in the state of California, while Texas and Tennessee follow with five and three players, respectively. They have also drafted two players from outside the United States: Carlos Correa (2012) and Ramón Castro (1994), both from Puerto Rico.The Astros won their first World Series title in 2017 with three of their first-round picks on the World Series roster—Correa, series MVP George Springer (2011), and Alex Bregman (2015). One Astros first-round pick is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Craig Biggio (1987), who played his entire 20-season MLB career (1988–2007) with the Astros and became a member of the 3,000 hit club, was elected to the Hall in 2015. Carlos Correa is the only Astros first-round pick to have won a Rookie of the Year award, joining Jeff Bagwell (1991, originally drafted by the Red Sox) as the two Astros to win ROY. No Astros first round pick has won a Most Valuable Player award or Cy Young Award with the team. Brad Lidge (1998) won the Comeback Player of the Year Award in 2008 with the Philadelphia Phillies, his first season after leaving the Astros.The Astros have made 12 selections in the supplemental round of the draft. They have made the first overall selection in the draft five times; in 1976, 1992, 2012, 2013, and 2014. They have had 16 compensatory picks since the institution of the First-Year Player Draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the prior off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The Astros have failed to sign three of their first-round picks. First, pitcher Randy Scarbery (1970) did not sign though the Astros received no pick in compensation. John Burke (1991) and Brady Aiken (2014) also did not sign. The Astros were given the 37th pick of the 1992 draft and a pick in the 2015 draft in compensation.

List of Major League Baseball statistical clubs

In Major League Baseball (MLB), a player joins a statistical club when he attains a certain milestone number in a specific statistical category. For milestones that encompass an entire career, batters must achieve 3,000 hits or 500 home runs; pitchers must amass 300 wins or 3,000 strikeouts. A fifth club exists for relief pitchers that have recorded 300 saves over a career. In addition, milestones achieved in a single season include hitting 50 home runs, while three other single-season statistical clubs—the 20–20–20 club, 30–30 club and 40–40 club — include achievements from multiple statistical categories.

Reaching any one of the four career milestone clubs is often described as a guarantee of eventual entry into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Lou Brock

Louis Clark Brock (born June 18, 1939) is an American former professional baseball player. He began his 19-year Major League Baseball (MLB) career playing in 1961 for the Chicago Cubs, and spent the majority of his career playing as a left fielder for the St. Louis Cardinals. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1985 and the St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame in 2014. He is currently a special instructor coach for the St. Louis Cardinals.

Brock was best known for breaking Ty Cobb's all-time major league stolen base record in 1977. He was an All-Star for six seasons and a National League (NL) stolen base leader for eight seasons. He led the NL in doubles and triples in 1968. He also led the NL in singles in 1972, and was the runner-up for the NL Most Valuable Player Award in 1974.

Paul Waner

Paul Glee Waner (April 16, 1903 – August 29, 1965), nicknamed "Big Poison", was an American professional baseball right fielder. He played for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Brooklyn Dodgers, Boston Braves, and New York Yankees of Major League Baseball from 1926 to 1945. He won three National League (NL) batting titles and the NL Most Valuable Player Award while with the Pirates. He was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1952.

Rafael Palmeiro

Rafael Palmeiro Corrales (born September 24, 1964) is a Cuban American Major League Baseball first baseman and left fielder for the Cleburne Railroaders of the American Association of Independent Professional Baseball. Palmeiro was an All-American at Mississippi State University before being drafted by the Chicago Cubs in 1985. He played for the Cubs (1986–1988), Texas Rangers (1989–1993, 1999–2003), and the Baltimore Orioles (1994–1998, 2004–2005).

He was named to the MLB All-Star Team four times, and won the Gold Glove three times. He is a member of the 500 home run club and the 3,000 hit club and is one of only six players in history to be a member of both. Days after recording his 3,000th hit, Palmeiro received a 10-game suspension for testing positive for an anabolic steroid.

Robin Yount

Robin R. Yount (; nicknamed,"The Kid", and "Rockin' Robin", born September 16, 1955) is an American former professional baseball player. He spent his entire 20-year career in Major League Baseball as a shortstop and center fielder for the Milwaukee Brewers (1974–93).

After growing up in California, Yount spent a couple of months in minor league baseball and advanced to the major leagues at the age of 18. He won two American League Most Valuable Player awards. In his best season, 1982, the Brewers made a World Series appearance. In 1999, Yount was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. Since his retirement as a player, Yount has held several roles as a baseball coach.

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