2nd Virginia Cavalry

The 2nd Virginia Volunteer Cavalry Regiment was a cavalry regiment raised in Virginia for service in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It fought mostly with the Army of Northern Virginia.

The unit was organized by Colonel Jubal Early in Lynchburg, Virginia, in May, 1861 as the 30th Virginia Volunteer Regiment under Col. Richard C.W. Radford (whence "Radford's Rangers"—not to be confused with Troop G's similar nickname). Its troops (the cavalry equivalent of infantry companies) were recruited across several counties of Central Virginia:

Troop: Nickname Captain Mustered
A: Bedford's "Clay Dragoons" William R. Terry 11 May 1861
B: Lynchburg's "Wise Troop"[1] John S. Langhorne 13 May 1861
C: "The Botetourt Dragoons" Andrew L. Pitzer 20 May 1861
D: "The Franklin Rangers" Giles W.B. Hale 22 May 1861
E: "The Amherst Mounted Rangers" Thomas Whitehead 29 May 1861
F: "The Bedford Southside Dragoons" James Wilson 31 May 1861
G: Bedford's "Radford Rangers" Edmund W. Radford 29 May 1861
H: "The Appomattox Rangers" Joel L. Flood 3 June 1861
I: "The Campbell Rangers" John D. Alexander 8 June 1861
K: "The Albemarle Light Horse" Eugene Davis 11 May 1861

At the end of October, 1861 the unit was re-designated the 2nd Virginia Cavalry Regiment.[2]

During the war it was brigaded under Generals B.H. Robertson, Fitzhugh Lee, W.C. Wickham, and Thomas Munford. The 2nd Cavalry saw action at First Bull Run, in Jackson's Valley Campaign, and at Second Bull Run, Mile Hill, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Kelly's Ford, Chancellorsville, Brandy Station, Aldie, Upperville, Gettysburg, and Shepherdstown. After the Bristoe and Mine Run campaigns, it was involved at The Wilderness, Todd's Tavern, Spotsylvania, Haw's Shop, and Cold Harbor. It fought in the Shenandoah Valley with Jubal Early and later in numerous conflicts around Petersburg and Appomattox.

The regiment contained 676 men in July, 1861, lost twenty-eight percent of the 163 engaged at Groveton Heights, and of the 385 at Gettysburg about four percent were disabled. At Appomattox it cut through the Federal lines and disbanded at Lynchburg on April 10, 1865. However, 19 men were included in the surrender.

The field officers were Colonels Richard C.W. Radford and Thomas T. Munford, Lieutenant Colonels Cary Breckinridge and James W. Watts, and Major William F. Graves.[3]

Future Commonwealth's Attorney and Virginia Bar Association President Micajah Woods enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Cavalry. Woods was the prosecuting attorney in the trial of Charlottesville mayor J. Samuel McCue, the last man to be hanged in Virginia.

Thomas Whitehead, the future one-term Representative of Virginia's 6th Congressional District to the House of Representatives, was the captain of Company E.

The flag of the Botetourt Dragoons was conserved by the United Daughters of the Confederacy Chapter 797 when it was listed as one of the top 12 flags needing conservation at the Museum of the Confederacy. The flag was constructed in 1861 when the Fincastle, Virginia unit rode off to war. The silk flag was used by the unit for two years, and the flag bearer, Rufus H. Peck, presented the flag to the Museum of the Confederacy in 1907.[4]

2nd Virginia Volunteer Cavalry Regiment
30th Virginia Volunteer Regiment
Flag of Virginia (1861–1865)
Flag of Virginia, 1861
ActiveMay 1861 – April 1865
DisbandedApril 1865
AllegianceConfederate States of America Confederate States of America
BranchConfederate States Army
TypeRegiment
RoleCavalry
EngagementsFirst Battle of Manassas
Jackson's Valley Campaign
Seven Days' Battles
Second Battle of Manassas
Battle of Sharpsburg
Battle of Fredericksburg
Battle of Chancellorsville
Battle of Brandy Station
Battle of Gettysburg
Bristoe Campaign
Overland Campaign
Siege of Petersburg
Valley Campaigns of 1864
Appomattox Campaign
Battle of Five Forks
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Col. Richard C.W. Radford
Col. Thomas T. Munford

See also

References

  1. ^ [1], Southern Historical Society Papers
  2. ^ [2], 2nd Virginia Cavalry tribute page
  3. ^ Robertson, Lindsay. "Cary Breckinridge (1839–1918)". Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved 12 August 2015.
  4. ^ McCoy, Edwin L. 2017. Botetourt County & the War Between the States: Commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the American Civil War. 2017. Pages 100-101.

External links


 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, National Park Service".

1st Virginia Cavalry

The 1st Virginia Volunteer Cavalry Regiment was a cavalry regiment raised in Virginia for service in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. It fought mostly with the Army of Northern Virginia.

35th Battalion Virginia Cavalry

The 35th Battalion of Virginia Cavalry, also known as White's Battalion, White's Rebels and the Comanches, was a Confederate cavalry unit during the American Civil War raised by Elijah V. White in Loudoun County, Virginia in the winter of 1861-62. The battalion was initially raised as border guards along the Potomac River below Harpers Ferry but were ultimately mustered into regular service as part of the Laurel Brigade. Despite this, they continued to play a conspicuous role in the ongoing partisan warfare in Loudoun throughout the war. The battalion was particularly notable during the 1863 Gettysburg Campaign, when it played a prominent role in the Battle of Brandy Station and subsequently conducted a series of raids on Union-held railroads and defensive positions in Maryland and Pennsylvania. The 35th was the first Confederate unit to enter Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Battle of Dranesville

The Battle of Dranesville was a small battle during the American Civil War that took place between Confederate forces under Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart and Union forces under Brigadier General Edward O. C. Ord on December 20, 1861, in Fairfax County, Virginia, as part of Major General George B. McClellan's operations in northern Virginia. The two forces on similar winter-time patrols encountered and engaged one another in the crossroads village of Dranesville. The battle resulted in a Union victory.

Battle of Mile Hill

The Battle of Mile Hill was a cavalry skirmish during the American Civil War, that took place just north of Leesburg, Virginia, on September 2, 1862. It preceded the occupation of the town by the Army of Northern Virginia just prior to its crossing of the Potomac River starting the Maryland Campaign.

Confederate cavalry under Col. Thomas T. Munford surprised and routed the Federal force of Cole's Maryland Cavalry and the independent Loudoun Rangers. The engagement successfully cleared the area of Federal forces, allowing Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia to occupy the town two days later on September 4, before crossing the Potomac north of town on September 6.

Cedar Mountain Confederate order of battle

The following Confederate States Army units and commanders fought in the Battle of Cedar Mountain of the American Civil War. The Union order of battle is shown separately.

Charles Minor Blackford

Charles Minor Blackford (October 17, 1833 – 1903) was a Virginia lawyer and an author of American Civil War stories. His wartime correspondence with his wife, since published, remains a valuable resource for facts about life in the Confederate Army. Blackford's war experiences ranged from Manassas to Gettysburg to Appomattox.

Cross Keys Confederate order of battle

The following Confederate States Army units and commanders fought in the Battle of Cross Keys of the American Civil War. The Union order of battle is listed separately.

First Winchester Confederate Order of Battle

The following Confederate States Army units and commanders fought in the First Battle of Winchester of the American Civil War. The Union order of battle is listed separately.

Five Forks Confederate order of battle

The following Confederate Army units and commanders fought in the Battle of Five Forks of the American Civil War. The Union order of battle is listed separately.

Immortal Six Hundred

The Immortal Six Hundred were 600 Confederate officers that were held prisoner by the Union Army in 1864-65. They were intentionally starved and 46 died as a result. They are known as the "Immortal Six Hundred" because they refused to take an oath of allegiance to the U.S. under duress.

List of Virginia Civil War units

Virginia provided the following units to the Virginia Militia and the Provisional Army of the Confederate States (PACS) during the American Civil War. Despite the state's secession from the Union it would supply them with third most troops from a Southern state (next to Tennessee and North Carolina) along with the newly created West Virginia totaling at 22,000. Also listed are the units of Virginian origin in the service of the Union Army.

Micajah Woods

Micajah Woods (May 17, 1844 – March 14, 1911) was a Virginia lawyer, who served as the Commonwealth's Attorney in Charlottesville, Virginia for 41 years, and was a president of The Virginia Bar Association.

Woods began life in Albemarle County, Virginia. He was educated at the Lewisburg Academy, the military school taught by Colonel John Bowie Strange, and the Bloomfield Academy. Woods joined the Confederate Army in August 1861 at the age of seventeen, a volunteer on the staff of John B. Floyd. Under military age, he spent the winter of 1861-62 at the University of Virginia and then joined the 2nd Virginia Cavalry. In 1863, he became a First Lieutenant in Thomas E. Jackson's Battery, Virginia Horse Artillery, and saw action at Gettysburg, New Market, and Cold Harbor.After the war Woods returned to the University and earned a Bachelor of Law degree in 1868. He practiced in Charlottesville and became Commonwealth's Attorney in 1870. In 1872 he was made a member of the board of visitors of the University of Virginia, a position which he held for four years, at the time of his appointment being the youngest member of the board ever selected. Woods served as president of The Virginia Bar Association in 1909. He was a member of the board of visitors of Virginia Tech in 1911.Woods is remembered locally as the prosecuting attorney in the murder trial of J. Samuel McCue, the three-term Mayor of Charlottesville who was convicted of murdering his wife then became the last man to be hanged in Albemarle County, and as the father of Maud Coleman Woods, the first "Miss America," at least for the Pan-American Exposition of 1901.

Opequon Confederate order of battle

The following Confederate States Army units and commanders fought in the Battle of Opequon on September 19, 1864. The Union order of battle is listed separately.

Port Republic Confederate order of battle

The following Confederate States Army units and commanders fought in the Battle of Port Republic of the American Civil War. The Union order of battle is listed separately.

Sinking Creek Raid

The Sinking Creek Raid took place in Greenbrier County, Virginia (now West Virginia) during the American Civil War. On November 26, 1862, an entire Confederate army camp was captured by 22 men from a Union cavalry during a winter snow storm. The 22 men were the advance guard for the 2nd Loyal Virginia Volunteer Cavalry, which was several miles behind. This cavalry unit was renamed 2nd West Virginia Volunteer Cavalry in 1863, after West Virginia became a state.

The Confederates, who were the rebels in the American Civil War, had an army camp near the foot of a mountain in Sinking Creek Valley. Their camp contained about 500 soldiers, who were surprised by the small group of Union cavalry men. Many of the rebels did not have their weapons loaded. The Union cavalry raced into the camp with sabers drawn, and quickly convinced the rebels to surrender in exchange for their lives. Over 100 rebel soldiers were taken prisoner. More than 100 horses and about 200 rifles were also captured, in addition to supplies and tents.

The leaders of the raid, Major William H. Powell and 2nd Lieutenant Jeremiah Davidson, both received promotions shortly afterwards. Powell was later awarded the Medal of Honor for this action. General George R. Crook said the Sinking Creek Raid was "one of the most daring, brilliant and successful of the whole war". Powell would eventually become a general. Davidson would rise to the rank of captain in the cavalry, and major in the infantry.

Thomas T. Munford

Thomas Taylor Munford (March 29, 1831 – February 27, 1918) was an American farmer, iron, steel and mining company executive and Confederate colonel and acting brigadier general during the American Civil War.

Thomas Whitehead

Thomas Whitehead (December 27, 1825 – July 1, 1901) was a nineteenth-century politician, lawyer, editor and merchant from Virginia.

William A. Rinehart

William Alonzo Rinehart (April 5, 1846 – January 30, 1922) was an American Democratic politician who served as a member of the Virginia Senate, representing the state's 7th district.

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