2nd Infantry Regiment (United States)

The 2nd Infantry Regiment is an infantry regiment in the United States Army that has served for more than two hundred years. It was constituted on 12 April 1808 as the 6th Infantry and consolidated with 4 other regiments in 1815 to form the present unit.[1]

2nd Infantry Regiment
002nd Infantry Regiment COA
Coat of arms
Active1808-present
Country United States
Branch United States Army
TypeInfantry
Role1st Bn – inactive
2nd Bn – light infantry
Part of 3rd BCT, 36th Infantry Division
Garrison/HQ1st Bn – inactive
2nd Bn – Fort Polk, Louisiana
Nickname(s)"Ramrods"
Motto(s)"Noli Me Tangere" (Do Not Touch Me)
EngagementsWar of 1812
Indian Wars
Mexican–U.S. War
American Civil War
War with Spain
Philippine Insurection
World War II
Vietnam War
War in Kosovo
Global War on Terrorism
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Hugh Brady
Bennett C. Riley
Insignia
Distinctive unit insignia
2nd Infantry Regiment DUI
U.S. Infantry Regiments
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1st Infantry Regiment 3rd Infantry Regiment

Origin

Although the original 2nd Infantry Regiment was constituted in March 1791 and fought in the Miami Indian Campaign and the War of 1812 at Fort Bowyer in Alabama its history and lineage is not a part of the present regiment. That regiment became part of the 1st Infantry through the consolidations of 1815.

At the end of the War of 1812 an act of Congress dated 3 March 1815 reduced the size of the Regular Army to a maximum of 10,000 men.[2] Eight infantry regiments, one rifle regiment and an artillery regiment were formed from the remains of the 46 existing regiments, while the cavalry was eliminated. This was done with no regard for the traditions of the existing regiments. The old regiments which happened to be closest together were pooled to form new regiments and the numbers assigned the regiments were based on the seniority of the colonels commanding them.

In accordance with the act, on 17 May 1815 a new 2nd US Infantry was created by the consolidation of the 6th, 16th, 22nd, 23rd, and 32nd Regiments of Infantry, all then located in upper New York and Vermont. The date of organization of the present 2nd Infantry is that of the original 6th Infantry, 12 April 1808. The regiment's headquarters was in the cantonment at Sackett's Harbor. Colonel Hugh Brady became the regiment's commanding officer with Henry Leavenworth as major and Ninian Pinkney as lieutenant-colonel.[3]:415 The regimental number was "2" because Brady was the second most senior regimental commander in the United States Army. Colonel Brady was in command of the 22nd Infantry at the time of the consolidation and, though he served in several other commands and reached the rank of major general, he remained colonel commandant of the 2nd Infantry Regiment from his residence in Detroit until his death on 15 April 1851.[4]

The War Department ruled that the present 2nd Infantry bear upon its colors the campaign honors of the regiments consolidated into its organization. Thus, the colors bear the campaign streamers for Canada, Chippawa and Lundy's Lane, even though the original/old 2nd Infantry did not participate in any of the battles in Canada during the War of 1812. The present 2nd Infantry also bears the two battle honors earned by the original/old 2nd Infantry for the Miami Campaign (1790-1795) and Alabama 1814.[5]

Military service

First Indian War period

In the ensuing years the regiment was primarily concerned with manning and constructing forts around the Great Lakes. When the Black Hawk War of 1832 erupted the 2nd Infantry was sent to Illinois but did not participate in any fighting. The regiment returned to its posts on the Great Lakes. During the Second Seminole War, from 1838 to 1842, the regiment was in Florida, where it was on the move daily, fighting and building roads and installations. In April 1840 with Colonel Brady attending to other duty assignments Lieutenant Colonel Bennett C. Riley assumed command of the regiment. Lieutenant Colonel Riley remained in command of the regiment until January 1850. In 1843 the regiment returned to its posts on Lakes Ontario and Champlain in upstate New York.[3]:423

War with Mexico

When war broke out with Mexico in 1846, the 2nd Infantry Regiment was sent to Camargo, Mexico and joined General David E. Twiggs' Brigade. From September 1846 to December 1847 the regiment campaigned from the Rio Grande to Mexico City, fighting in battles at Veracruz, Cerro Gordo, Contreras, Churubusco, Moline del Rey and Chapultepec.

Second Indian War period

In September 1848 because of conflicts with the Indians in Oregon and California the regiment was sent west. The regiment sailed via Rio de Janeiro, Cape Horn and Santiago, Chile, to California. Between 1849 and 1853 the regiment was in California occupying stations from Goose Lake on the north to Fort Yuma on the south and the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Sierra Nevada Mountains on the east, scouting, providing protection for the '49ers and fighting throughout the entire area. The regiment returned to New York in 1853 only to be sent to the Western Plains where it constructed or reconstructed forts, built roads and scouted the hills and plains along the Missouri River as far west as Fort Kearny, Nebraska and Fort Laramie, Wyoming.

American Civil War

During the Civil War the 2nd Infantry fought in the early Battle of Wilson's Creek in Missouri and the first Battle of Bull Run. The regiment was assigned to the Army of the Potomac and fought in engagements such as Manassas, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Fredericksburg, and Gettysburg. By June 1864 the commissioned and enlisted strength of the regiment had reached such a low figure, less than 100 men, that at the request of the regimental commander the remaining enlisted men were transferred to Company C, and that company was given a full complement of officers and non-commissioned officers. From then until December 1864 the entire regiment consisted of just Company C. On 18 April 1869 the 2nd Infantry was consolidated with the 16th Infantry and the consolidated unit was designated as the 2nd Infantry.

The 2nd Infantry bears nine battle honors from the Southern Campaign through its 1869 consolidation with the 16th Infantry. These honors were earned by the 16th Infantry: Atlanta, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Georgia 1864, Kentucky 1862, Mississippi 1862, Murfreesboro, Shiloh, and Tennessee 1863

Third Indian War period

From 1877 to 1886 the regiment was in Washington, Oregon and Idaho Territory campaigning against the Nez Perce, then the Bannocks and then a band of the Eastern Shoshones called the Sheepeaters. In 1886 it moved to Fort Omaha, Nebraska to help fight the Sioux. The 2nd Infantry was on the Pine Ridge Reservation on 29 December 1890 when the Wounded Knee Massacre occurred and, although the regiment was not involved, one officer from the regiment was wounded there. The regiment remained on the western plains until 1898.

Spanish–American War

In 1898 the regiment was deployed to Cuba at the start of the Spanish–American War, with Headquarters, Staff, Band, and Companies C and G sailing on the same ship with the Rough Riders. The regiment, under the command of LTC William Wherry, (regimental commander COL John C. Bates had been promoted to brigadier general of volunteers) fought in battles along the road to San Juan Heights and the battle of Santiago, where it fought on the extreme left of San Juan Heights. In August 1898, the regiment returned to the United States only to return to Cuba in January 1899. The regiment stayed in Cuba until September 1899 when it returned to the United States to prepare for deployment to the Philippines.

Philippine Insurrection

In August/September 1900 the 2nd Infantry was deployed to deal with the Philippine Insurrection during which it fought in over 25 engagements on several of the islands. In May 1903 the regiment returned to duty in the western United States, it was stationed at Fort Logan, Colorado and Fort D. A. Russell, Wyoming. In February 1906 the regiment was redeployed to the Philippines and remained there until returning to the United States in March 1908. The 3rd Battalion went to Fort Assinniboine, Montana and the balance of the regiment to Fort Thomas, Kentucky for training and garrison duties until deploying to Hawaii in 1911.

World War I

When war broke out, the 2nd Infantry Regiment was on security duty in the Hawaiian Islands guarding interned German ships and sailors, as well as various U.S. installations. In July 1918, it returned to the United States and was assigned to the 19th Division at Camp Dodge, Iowa. The war ended just as the regiment was about to deploy to France. In 1919, the regiment was relieved from the 19th Division and resumed as a separate regiment.

Post-World War I

In September 1919, following the 2nd Infantry Regiment's release from the 19th Division, it was stationed at Camp Sherman, Ohio. In October 1921 the 2nd Infantry Regiment was ordered to Fort Snelling, Minnesota and Fort Sheridan, Illinois but as they reached their destinations the 2nd and 3rd Battalions were eliminated and Headquarters and 1st Battalion were at Fort Sheridan as a training battalion. In August 1922 the 2nd Infantry Regiment was redesignated a combat regiment and the 2nd and 3rd Battalions were reorganized using personnel from the 54th Infantry. In March 1923 the regiment was assigned to the 6th Division. Headquarters and 1st Battalion stayed at Fort Sheridan, 2nd Battalion was at Fort Wayne (Detroit), Michigan and 3rd Battalion was at Fort Brady, Michigan. Between August 1922 and October 1939 no major changes were made and the 2nd Infantry Regiment participated in garrison training, maneuvers, field training and other duties.

World War II

In 1939 prior to World War II, the 2nd Infantry Regiment was assigned to the 5th Infantry Division. In February 1942 the regiment was sent to Iceland for training, to provide security for U.S. bases located there, and to load and unload supply ships. It was then sent to England and then Ireland for training. In July 1944 the 2nd Infantry Regiment along with the 5th Infantry Division landed in Normandy, France. It became part of General George Patton's Third United States Army, leading the way in the breakout from the beaches of Normandy in Operation Cobra, capturing Rheims and then seized Metz after a major battle at Fort Driant.

When the Battle of the Bulge began the 2nd Infantry Regiment moved to the battle zone in the area of Nideranven, Luxembourg. In January 1945 the 2nd Infantry Regiment forced a crossing of the Sauer River and attacked into the Siegfried Line. The regiment then crossed the Rhine River near Oppenheim and secured the crossing for other Third Army units. The unit then spearheaded the attack into Czechoslovakia and was located near the town of Volary when the word came to cease all forward movement at 08:31 on 7 May 1945.

Post-World War II

Following World War II the 2nd Infantry Regiment returned to the United States and was inactivated and activated several times and returned to Germany for a period. During the Korean War the regiment was stationed at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania with the 5th Infantry Division training recruits for deployment to Korea. In June 1957, at the time of the Pentomic reorganization, the 2nd Infantry Regiment was stationed at Fort Ord, California with the 5th Infantry Division, serving as a training regiment. The 2nd Battalion was reorganized and redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battle Group, 2nd Infantry and released from assignment with 5th Infantry Division and assigned to the 1st Infantry Division. At this time both the 1st and 3rd Battalions were inactivated.

In January 1959 the 2nd Battle Group was reassigned to the 24th Infantry Division in Germany. In February 1962 the 1st Battalion was activated and assigned to the 2nd Brigade, 5th Infantry Division. The 2d Battle Group, 2nd Infantry was reorganized and redesignated and concurrently relieved from assignment to the 24th Infantry Division and also assigned to the 2nd Brigade, 5th Infantry Division. Both battalions were stationed at Fort Devens, Massachusetts.

Vietnam War

With the fighting in Vietnam escalating the 1st Infantry Division was restructured. Battle groups were redesignated as infantry battalions. On 12 July 1965 the 1st and 2nd Battalions, 2nd Infantry were relieved from assignment to the 5th Infantry Division and assigned to the 1st Infantry Division with no change of station and in September 1965 the two battalions deployed to Vietnam, landing on the beach at Vũng Tàu in October 1965. From there they proceeded to their assigned areas, Phước Vĩnh for the 1st Battalion and Lai Khe for the 2nd Battalion. The battalions initially fought as light infantry in the areas north and west of Saigon. On 2 January 1967 the 2nd Battalion officially became a mechanized infantry battalion.

The 1st Battalion sustained its first major casualties of the war on 21 December 1965 when the enemy ambushed the command group of Company B as the company was moving out of Bien Hoa on routine patrol. On 25 August 1966 during Operation Amarillo a patrol from Company C, 1st Battalion was ambushed after stumbling into a Viet Cong base camp, losing 6 men killed of the 15 man patrol, total US losses in the operation were 41 killed, 45 Viet Cong bodies were found, while later intelligence indicated that Viet Cong losses were 171 men killed.[6] The 2nd Battalion fought the first major battles at Ap Bau Bang on 12 November 1965 and Ap Nha Mat on 5 December 1965. Heavy losses were suffered at Ap Nha Mat and three soldiers are still listed as missing.[7]

During four and a half years the battalions were involved in major operations such as: Junction City, the largest operation conducted up to that time, Lam Son II, Paul Bunyan, Bu Dop, AKA, Battle of Hill 172, An Lộc, and An Lộc II, and numerous other operations and small unit actions. Contact with the enemy was almost daily. When the 1st Infantry Division stood down in March and April 1970 the 1st and 2nd Battalion's colors were cased and the soldiers were either reassigned to other units in Vietnam or returned to the United States to be discharged.

Post-Vietnam War

In early April 1970 an honor guard returned Fort Riley, Kansas with the 1st Division and its assigned unit’s colors. At that time the 1st Battalion became a mechanized infantry battalion and remained active with the 1st Infantry Division until it was inactivated on 1 October 1983. On 15 April 1970 the 2nd Battalion was inactivated.

On 21 March 1973 the 2nd Battalion was relieved from assignment to the 1st Infantry Division and reassigned to the 9th Infantry Division. It was activated at Fort Lewis, Washington with the reflagging of the 1st Battalion, 60th Infantry. In May 1991 the 2nd Battalion was inactivated and relieved from assignment to the 9th Infantry Division.

On 16 February 1996 the 2nd Battalion was reassigned to the 1st Infantry Division and on 27 March was activated at Rose Barracks, Vilseck, Germany as Task Force 2/2 Infantry with the reflagging of the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry. The 2nd Battalion deployed to Bosnia in support of Operation Joint Guard in 1996. In 1997 the battalion, as part of Task Force Eagle Stabilization Force (SFOR), was awarded the Army Superior Unit Award for actions such as Brčko riots and Hill 562.[8] The 2nd Battalion redeployed to Vilseck in October 1997. On 24 November 1999, the battalion deployed to Camp Monteith, Kosovo. The battalion was redeployed to Vilseck in June 2000. The unit was again deployed to Camp Monteith, Kosovo in November 2002 until July 2003 as the last regular Army unit conducting operations. The national guard took formal command of operations from the 2nd Battalion.

Global War on Terrorism

1st Battalion

On 17 March 2008, for the first time in over 24 years, the 1st Battalion was activated in Schweinfurt, Germany with the reflagging of the 1st Battalion, 18th Infantry. 1-18 was a part of 2nd "Dagger" Brigade, 1st Infantry Division which was also reflagged as the 172nd Infantry Brigade (Separate). The 1st Battalion was assigned to 172nd Infantry Brigade and was a mechanized infantry battalion. The battalion had adopted the motto "Back in Black" and wore black scarves in recognition of the battalion's service in Vietnam.

In December 2008 the 1st Battalion (TF 1-2) deployed to Iraq and suffered its first casualty in April 2009 when a soldier was killed by an IED. In late October 2009 the first elements of the 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry and the 172nd Infantry Brigade began returning to Germany from Iraq. By mid November the entire battalion was back in Germany. TF 1-2 suffered four killed and three wounded during its deployment. The 1st Battalion had a change of command on 19 May 2010 and along with the entire 172d Infantry Brigade moved to Grafenwoehr, Germany.

In late July 2011 the 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry (TF 1-2) along with the entire 172nd Infantry Brigade deployed to Afghanistan. The transfer of authority from 1st Battalion, 61st Cavalry (101st Airborne Division) to Task Force 1-2 Infantry (TF 1-2) occurred on 13 August 2011 at 10:00. TF 1-2 was detached from the 172nd and worked for 3rd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division and was in control of Western Nangarhar.

On 14 August 2011 the 1st Battalion sustained its first casualties when two soldiers from Company A were killed by an IED while recovering a damaged vehicle. Company A, 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry had been attached to TF 3-66 Armor since 2008. Alpha Company, 3rd Battalion, 66th Armor (attached) worked in the Zio Haq area and Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry fought at FOB Altimur.

On 24 November 2011, the Black Scarves were ordered to move from Nangarhar to FOB Andar in Ghazni Province, Afghanistan to conduct a relief in place with the 2nd Battalion. On 3 January 2012 at 10:30, the transfer of authority between the two units occurred. Following the ceremony the 2nd Battalion began departing Afghanistan.

In early June 2012 the 1st Battalion began departing Afghanistan and returned to their base in Grafenwoehr, Germany with the last troops arriving back in Germany on 19 June. Task Force 1-2 suffered over 15 wounded during their latest deployment and A Company, 1st Battalion suffered 2 killed in action and 3 wounded while attached to Task Force 3-66 Armor. After returning to Germany the battalion trained and conducted Expert Infantryman Badge testing.

The 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry along with the entire 172nd Infantry Brigade was inactivated in a Casing of the Colors ceremony held on 31 May 2013. The effective date of the battalion's inactivation was 15 June 2013.

2nd Battalion

In April 2003 with Operation Iraqi Freedom underway, Company B, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry deployed to Bashur Airfield in Northern Iraq as part of the 173rd Airborne Brigade's Task Force 1-63 Armor, to aid in opening a northern front in Iraq. This was called Operation Airborne Dragon, Northern Iraq with the entire task force being air lifted from Germany. Company B and the entire task force returned to Germany in February 2004.

In the spring of 2004 the 2nd Battalion, less Company B, deployed to Iraq with the 1st Infantry Division. On 20 July 2004 SSG Raymond Bittinger, 3rd Platoon, Company C, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry was awarded a Silver Star for leadership and heroism under fire on 9 April 2004 in Baqubah, Iraq.[9] SSG Bittinger was the first soldier of the 1st Infantry Division to receive a Silver Star during Operation Iraqi Freedom. During its year deployment to Iraq Task Force 2-2 Infantry also fought at Al Muqdadiyah, An Najaf, Al Fallujah, Mosul, and Baqubah.

In November 2004 Task Force 2-2, which comprised HHC; Company A; scouts of the 2/2; Company A, 2d Battalion, 63d Armor; 2d Platoon, Company B, 1st Engineer Battalion; 2d Platoon, Company A, 82d Engineer Battalion; Troop F, 4th Cavalry; and 1st Platoon, Battery A, 1/6 Field Artillery, fought alongside U.S. Marines in the Battle of Fallujah.[10] Task Force 2-2 Infantry received a Presidential Unit Citation for their actions in the Battle of Fallujah.

The 2nd Battalion returned to Germany in February 2005. In May 2006 the battalion was disbanded and its colors were cased. On 19 April 2007 the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry was activated as a light infantry battalion with the 1st Infantry Division, 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team at Fort Hood, Texas.

In June 2008 the 2nd Battalion, along with the 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, deployed to Afghanistan. The battalion conducted operations in the Maywand District of Kandahar Province. On 4 September 2008 Company C, 2nd Battalion suffered its first casualties when a Humvee was hit by an IED and a follow on enemy attack. On 6 May 2009 at FOB Ramrod, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates presented awards to six members of Company C, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry Regiment, for their actions on 4 September. Bronze Star awards with "V" device went to SSG Anthony Roszko, SPC Kevin Tibbett, and CPL Justin Skotnicki. Army Commendation Medals with "V" device went to PFC Michael Kehrer, PVT Alexander Hayes and SGT Justin Chaney.[11] On 28 May 2009 PFC Robert Debolt, a rifleman with Company C, 2nd Battalion, was awarded a Silver Star for gallantry. SGT Ramin Berntsson was also awarded a Bronze Star with "V" device for his actions that day, upon redeployment to Fort Hood, Texas. The 2nd Battalion returned to Fort Hood in June 2009. On 10 September 2009 the 2nd Battalion had a change of command and on 16 October 2009 moved to Fort Knox, Kentucky.

U.S. Army Spc. Nancy Vega, a truck driver with Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, conducts a radio check before a mission brief at Forward Operating Base 130807-A-ZZ999-002
Spc. Nancy Vega, a truck driver with E Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry Regiment, 3rd IBCT, conducts a radio check at FOB Apache

In January 2011 the 2nd Battalion, along with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team once again deployed to Afghanistan. The battalion conducted operations in Ghazni Province. On 27 February 2011 the battalion sustained its first casualties when one soldier was killed and four wounded by an IED. In its one-year deployment 2nd Battalion suffered 3 killed and 49 wounded while conducting over 1,900 combat patrols and 22 air assaults as they and their Afghan partners captured 111 caches and killed 250 insurgents. On 3 January 2012, following a change of authority ceremony with 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry, the 2nd Battalion began departing Afghanistan. Since returning to Fort Knox the 2nd Battalion had a change of command and in training for its next deployment to Afghanistan.

In June 2013 the 2nd Battalion, along with the 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, again deployed to Afghanistan. The unit took responsibility for the security forces assistance team mission in Zabul Province at a TOA ceremony when it relieved the 5th Troop, 7th Cavalry.

In late February 2014, following a transfer of authority with the 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry at FOB Apache, the 2nd Battalion left Afghanistan and returned to Fort Knox.

The 2nd Battalion was inactivated as part of 3rd Brigade, 1st Infantry Division's inactivation on 21 May 2014.

On 13 January 2015 Company D 2d Battalion was activated as part of the 4th BSTB, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division in a ceremony on Fort Polk's Mountain Field. Company D was being activated as a "provisional" company, attached to the 4th Brigade Special Troops Battalion, in support of a security support tasking for SOUTHCOM. The mission will consist of CPT Andrews as the D Co Commander, SFC Ramos as the 1SG/NCOIC, and about 50 Soldiers selected from 2-4 IN, 2-30 IN & 3-89 CAV, all units from within 4-10 MTN. They performed security duties in support of humanitarian operations, within the SOUTHCOM AOR. Their mission is from FEB-AUG 2015, and when they return to Fort Polk, they will "officially" become part of 2d Battalion 2d Infantry. In February Company D, 2d Battalion deployed with the USNS Comfort on a seven month humanitarian mission to the Caribbean. The official uncasing of the colors and Assumption of Command ceremony for the 2d Battalion was held on 3 September 2015 at Fort Polk, LA. Company D returned from their 7 month deployment on the USNS Comfort on 30 September 2015.

On 21 March 2016 the Department of the Army announced that the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, stationed in Fort Polk, Louisiana, will be associated with the Texas Army National Guard's 36th Infantry Division. For the first time ever an active duty unit would wear a National Guard patch. This historic event was part of the U.S. Army's Associated Units Pilot Program. At a ceremony held on 16 September 2016 the 3rd Brigade, 10th Mountain "Patriots" removed their 10th Mountain Division patch and place on the highly regarded T Patch of the 36th Infantry Division.

On 19 April 2017 LTC John Newman assumed command of the 2d Battalion from LTC Aaron Coombs. Beginning in Mid-September 2017 the 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry along with other elements of the 3d Brigade Combat Team of the 10th Mountain Division began deploying to Iraq for a 9 month tour. They will be replacing the 2d Brigade Combat Team of the 82d Airborne Division. The 2d Battalion began returned to Fort Polk beginning in June 2018.

On 22 March 2019 LTC Andrew Sinden assumed command of the 2d Battalion from LTC John Newman at a change of command ceremony held at Fort Polk, LA.

Medal of Honor recipients

Three soldiers earned the Medal of Honor while serving with the 2nd Infantry:

  • First Sergeant Daniel W. Burke, Company B, for his actions at Shepherdstown Ford, Virginia, on 20 September 1862. When his unit retreated across the Potomac, he learned that a piece of artillery had been left unspiked, leaving it usable by the enemy. He volunteered to go back and disable the gun, and returned to spike the gun in the face of the enemy. Coming under heavy rebel fire he was unable to complete the task, he retreated back across the river under constant fire.[12][13] He was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 2nd Infantry on 18 July 1862 and promoted to first lieutenant on 2 July 1863. He remained in the Army and retired as a brigadier general on 21 October 1899.[14] He is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
  • Sergeant Candelario Garcia, Jr. was posthumously be awarded the Medal of Honor on 18 March 2014 for actions while serving as an acting Team Leader for Company B, 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations in Lai Khe, Republic of Vietnam on 8 December 1968. Sergeant Garcia was originally awarded a Distinguished Service Cross for his actions.[15]
  • Staff Sergeant James Leroy Bondsteel, Company A, 2nd Battalion, for his actions in An Lộc Province, Vietnam, on 24 May 1969. The major U.S. Army base in Kosovo, Camp Bondsteel, was named in his honor.

Casualties

Casualty lists for all the conflicts that the 2nd Infantry has been in can be found at http://www.secinfreg.org/rosters.htm

Heraldry

Distinctive unit insignia

  • Description

A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 in. (2.86 cm) in height consisting of a shield blazoned: Or, on a saltire inches Azure between in fess a cross pattée and a five-bastioned fort Gules and in base a giant cactus Vert, two arrows in a quiver Proper crossed with a bolo Argent hilted Sable. Attached below the shield is a Blue scroll inscribed "NOLI ME TANGERE" in Gold letters.

  • Symbolism

Service in the Civil War is shown by the blue cross from the Confederate flag and the red cross pattée, the badge of the 18th Division, V Corps, in which the regiment served during the greater part of that war. Service in the Mexican War is shown by the cactus; in the War with Spain by the five-bastioned fort, the badge of the V Corps in Cuba. The Indian campaigns of the regiment are shown by the arrows and quiver, and the bolo is for service in the Philippine Insurrection.

  • Background

The first design for the distinctive unit insignia of the 2d Infantry Regiment was approved on 20 February 1920. That design was canceled and the present design authorized for the regiment on 19 June 1936.

Coat of arms

  • Blazon
    • Shield: Or on a saltire Azure between in fess a cross pattée and a five-bastioned fort Gules and in base a giant cactus Vert, two arrows in a quiver Proper crossed with a bolo Argent hilted Sable.
    • Crest: On a wreath of the colors a lion passant guardant Or.
    • Motto: NOLI ME TANGERE (Do Not Touch Me)
  • Symbolism
    • Shield: Service in the Civil War is shown by the blue cross from the Confederate flag and the red cross pattée, the badge of the 18th Division, V Corps, in which the regiment served during the greater part of that war. Service in the Mexican War is shown by the cactus; in the War with Spain by the five-bastioned fort, the badge of the V Corps in Cuba. The Indian campaigns of the regiment are shown by the arrows and quiver, and the bolo is for service in the Philippine Insurrection.
    • Crest: The lion represents the Canadian campaigns of the War of 1812.
  • Background: The coat of arms was approved on 6 June 1921.

Lineage

Regiment

  • Constituted 12 April 1808 in the Regular Army as the 6th Infantry
  • Organized May–July 1808 in Pennsylvania, New York, and New Jersey
  • Consolidated May–October 1815 with the 16th Infantry (constituted 11 January 1812), the 22d and 23d Infantry (both constituted 26 June 1812), and the 32d Infantry (constituted 29 January 1813) to form the 2d Infantry
  • Consolidated 18 April 1869 with the 16th Infantry (see ANNEX) and consolidated unit designated as the 2d Infantry
  • Assigned 27 July 1918 to the 19th Division
  • Relieved 14 February 1919 from assignment to the 19th Division
  • Assigned 24 March 1923 to the 6th Division
  • Relieved 16 October 1939 from assignment to the 6th Division and assigned to the 5th Division (later redesignated as the 5th Infantry Division)
  • Inactivated 20 September 1946 at Camp Campbell, Kentucky
  • Activated 15 July 1947 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
  • Inactivated 30 April 1950 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
  • Activated 1 March 1951 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
  • Inactivated 1 September 1953 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
  • Activated 25 May 1954 in Germany
  • Relieved 1 June 1957 from assignment to the 5th Infantry Division and reorganized as a parent regiment under the Combat Arms Regimental System
  • Withdrawn 16 June 1986 from the Combat Arms Regimental System and reorganized under the United States Army Regimental System
  • Redesignated 1 October 2005 as the 2d Infantry Regiment

ANNEX

  • Constituted 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as the 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry
  • Organized 21 August 1861 at Camp Slemmer (Chicago), Illinois
  • Reorganized and redesignated 21 September 1866 as the 16th Infantry

1st Battalion

  • Constituted 12 April 1808 in the Regular Army as a company of the 6th Infantry
  • Organized between May and July 1808 in Pennsylvania, New York, or New Jersey
  • Consolidated May–October 1815 with a company of the 16th Infantry (constituted 11 January 1812), a company each of the 22d and 23d Infantry (both constituted 26 June 1812), and a company of the 32d Infantry (constituted 29 January 1813) to form a company of the 2d Infantry
  • Designated 22 May 1816 as Company A, 2d Infantry
  • Consolidated 18 April 1869 with Company A, 16th Infantry (see ANNEX) and consolidated unit designated as Company A, 2d Infantry

(2d Infantry assigned 27 July 1918 to the 19th Division; relieved 14 February 1919 from assignment to the 19th Division; assigned 24 March 1923 to the 6th Division; relieved 16 October 1939 from assignment to the 6th Division and assigned to the 5th Division (later redesignated as the 5th Infantry Division))

  • Inactivated 20 September 1946 at Camp Campbell, Kentucky
  • Activated 15 July 1947 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
  • Inactivated 30 April 1950 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
  • Activated 1 March 1951 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
  • Inactivated 1 September 1953 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
  • Activated 25 May 1954 in Germany
  • Inactivated 1 June 1957 at Fort Ord, California, and relieved from assignment to the 5th Infantry Division; concurrently, redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battle Group, 2d Infantry
  • Redesignated 19 February 1962 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry, assigned to the 5th Infantry Division, and activated at Fort Devens, Massachusetts (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated)
  • Redesignated 19 February 1962 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry, assigned to the 5th Infantry Division, and activated at Fort Devens, Massachusetts (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated)
  • Relieved 12 July 1965 from assignment to the 5th Infantry Division and assigned to the 1st Infantry Division
  • Inactivated 1 October 1983 at Fort Riley, Kansas, and relieved from assignment to the 1st Infantry Division
  • Redesignated 1 October 2005 as the 1st Battalion, 2d Infantry Regiment
  • Assigned 16 March 2008 to the 172d Infantry Brigade and activated in Germany
  • Inactivated 15 June 2013 at Grafenwoehr, Germany

ANNEX

  • Constituted 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as Company A, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry
  • Organized 21 August 1861 at Camp Slemmer (Chicago), Illinois
  • Reorganized and redesignated 21 September 1866 as Company A, 16th Infantry
  • Consolidated 18 April 1869 with Company A, 2d Infantry, and consolidated unit designated as Company A, 2d Infantry[16]

2nd Battalion

  • Constituted 12 April 1808 in the Regular Army as a company of the 6th Infantry
  • Organized between May and July 1808 in Pennsylvania, New York, or New Jersey
  • Consolidated May–October 1815 with a company of the 16th Infantry (constituted 11 January 1812), a company each of the 22d and 23d Infantry (both constituted 26 June 1812), and a company of the 32d Infantry (constituted 29 January 1813) to form a company of the 2d Infantry
  • Designated 22 May 1816 as Company B, 2d Infantry
  • Consolidated 18 April 1869 with Company B, 16th Infantry (see ANNEX), and consolidated unit designated as Company B, 2d Infantry
  • (2d Infantry assigned 27 July 1918 to the 19th Division; relieved 14 February 1919 from assignment to the 19th Division; assigned 24 March 1923 to the 6th Division; relieved 16 October 1939 from assignment to the 6th Division and assigned to the 5th Division [later redesignated as the 5th Infantry Division])
  • Inactivated 20 September 1946 at Camp Campbell, Kentucky
  • Activated 15 July 1947 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
  • Inactivated 30 April 1950 at Fort Jackson, South Carolina
  • Activated 1 March 1951 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
  • Inactivated 1 September 1953 at Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pennsylvania
  • Activated 25 May 1954 in Germany
  • Reorganized and redesignated 15 February 1957 as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battle Group, 2d Infantry, relieved from assignment to the 5th Infantry Division, and assigned to the 1st Infantry Division (organic elements concurrently constituted and activated)
  • Relieved 28 January 1959 from assignment to the 1st Infantry Division and assigned to the 24th Infantry Division
  • Reorganized and redesignated 19 February 1962 as the 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry; concurrently relieved from assignment to the 24th Infantry Division and assigned to the 5th Infantry Division
  • Relieved 12 July 1965 from assignment to the 5th Infantry Division and assigned to the 1st Infantry Division
  • Inactivated 15 April 1970 at Fort Riley, Kansas
  • Relieved 21 March 1973 from assignment to the 1st Infantry Division, assigned to the 9th Infantry Division, and activated at Fort Lewis, Washington
  • Inactivated 15 May 1991 at Fort Lewis, Washington, and relieved from assignment to the 9th Infantry Division
  • Assigned 16 February 1996 to the 1st Infantry Division and activated in Germany
  • Redesignated 1 October 2005 as the 2d Battalion, 2d Infantry Regiment
  • Relieved 16 April 2007 from assignment to the 1st Infantry Division and assigned to the 3d Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division

ANNEX

  • Constituted 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as Company B, 1st Battalion, 16th Infantry
  • Organized 21 August 1861 at Camp Slemmer, Illinois
  • Reorganized and redesignated 21 September 1866 as Company B, 16th Infantry
  • Consolidated 18 April 1869 with Company B, 2d Infantry, and consolidated unit designated as Company B, 2d Infantry[17]

Honors

Campaign participation

Decorations

1st Battalion

2nd Battalion

  • Presidential Unit Citation for FALLUJAH 2004
  • Valorous Unit Award for AP BAU BANG 1965
  • Valorous Unit Award for BINH DUONG PROVINCE 1965
  • Valorous Unit Award for BINH LONG PROVINCE 1969
  • Company C: Valorous Unit Award for BINH LONG PROVINCE 1968
  • Valorous Unit Award, Streamer embroidered AN NAJAF PROVINCE 10 APR 2004 – 22 Apr 2004
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered AFGHANISTAN 2011- 2012
  • Meritorious Unit Commendation (Army), Streamer embroidered AFGHANISTAN 2013-2014
  • Army Superior Unit Award, (Army), Streamer embroidered 1997
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1965-1968
  • Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with Palm, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1969
  • Republic of Vietnam Civil Action Honor Medal, First Class, Streamer embroidered VIETNAM 1965-1970
  • Company C: Valorous Unit Award, Streamer embroidered BINH LONG PROVINCE 1968
  • Companies A and C Valorous Unit Award for AN NAJAF PROVINCE 10 APR 2004 – 22 APR 2004
  • Detachment Company B: Valorous Unit Award for AFGHANISTAN 17 June 2013-1 November 2013

The following awards were earned by companies of the 2nd Infantry Regiment in World War II.

  • Company E: Distinguished Unit Citation embroidered SANRY SUR NIED. (WD GO 68, 1945)
  • Company E: Fr CdeG with Palm embroidered SANRY SUR NIED. (DA GO 43, 1950)
  • Company H 1st Section, 3rd Platoon: Distinguished Unit Citation embroidered SANRY SUR NIED. (nondisplayable) (WD GO 68, 1945)

In popular culture

See also

References

  1. ^ "Lineage and Honors Information 2d Infantry Regiment". U.S. Army Center of Military History. Retrieved 7 August 2012.
  2. ^ "Annals of Congress". 13th Cong., 3rd sess.: 1934.
  3. ^ a b Wright, W. M. "The Second Regiment of Infantry"., in Rodenbough, Theo. P.; William L. Haskin, eds. (1896). The Army of the United States: Historical Sketches of Staff and Line with Portraits of Generals-in-Chief. New York: Maynard, Merrill & Co.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  4. ^ Driscoll, John K. (5 December 2005). Rogue: A Biography of Civil War General Justus McKinstry. McFarland. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-7864-2385-9.
  5. ^ Official Army Register. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office. 1 January 1929. p. 920. Retrieved 23 July 2012.
  6. ^ Carland, John (2000). Combat Operations: Stemming the Tide, May 1965 to October 1966. Government Printing Office. p. 333. ISBN 9781782663430.
  7. ^ "U.S. Unaccounted-For from the Vietnam War (Sorted by Name) Prisoners of War, Missing in Action and Killed in Action/Body not Recovered" (PDF). Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. Retrieved 20 March 2017.
  8. ^ "General Orders No. 25" (PDF). Department of the Army. 8 June 2001. pp. 59–60.
  9. ^ Emert, Rick (25 July 2004). "GI awarded Silver Star for role in Iraq fight". Stars and Stripes. Retrieved 23 July 2012.
  10. ^ Camp, Dick (15 December 2009). Operation Phantom Fury: The Assault and Capture of Fallujah, Iraq. Zenith Imprint. p. 125. ISBN 978-1-61673-253-0. Retrieved 30 June 2013.
  11. ^ Miles, Donna (7 May 2009). "Gates' Afghanistan Visit Focuses on Troop Needs". American Forces Press Service. Archived from the original on 28 August 2010. Retrieved 30 June 2013.
  12. ^ "Medal of Honor Recipients, Civil War (A-L)". Center of Military History, U.S. Army. Archived from the original on 12 September 2010. Retrieved 25 September 2010.
  13. ^ "Medal of Honor for Burke, Daniel W."
  14. ^ Official Army Register for 1909. Washington, D.C.: The Adjutant General's Office. 1 December 1908. p. 446.
  15. ^ Rothberg, Daniel (21 February 2014). "Obama will award Medal of Honor to 24 overlooked Army veterans". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 6 March 2014.
  16. ^ "Lineage and Honors, 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry". United States Army Center of Military History.
  17. ^ "Lineage and Honors, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry". United States Army Center of Military History.
  18. ^ https://secinfreg.websitetoolbox.com/post/billy-lynn%E2%80%99s-long-halftime-walk-8150221

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Army Center of Military History.

Further reading

11th Infantry Regiment (United States)

The 11th Infantry Regiment is a regiment in the United States Army.

Index of World War II articles (0–9)

1 Alpine Division Taurinense

1st Alpini Regiment

1 Cent WWII (Dutch coin)

1st Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

1 vs 40 (Zipang manga)

1. Jagd-Division

1.1"/75 caliber gun

10 cm K 17

10.5 cm FlaK 38

10.5 cm leFH 16

10.5 cm leFH 18/40

10.5 cm leFH 18

10.5 cm leFH 18M

10.5 cm Leichtgeschütz 40

10.5 cm Leichtgeschütz 42

10.5 cm schwere Kanone 18

100 mm field gun M1944 (BS-3)

100th Division (United States)

100th Guards Rifle Division

100th Light Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

101st Airborne Division (United States)

101st Infantry Division (France)

101st Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

101st SS Heavy Panzer Detachment

102nd Fortress Division (France)

102nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

102nd Infantry Division (United States)

103rd Infantry Division (United States)

104th Division (United States)

105 mm Howitzer M3

106th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

106th Infantry Division (United States)

107 mm divisional gun M1940 (M-60)

107 mm gun M1910/30

1077th Anti-Aircraft Regiment (Soviet Union)

10H64

10th Armored Division (United States)

10th Armoured Cavalry Brigade (Poland)

10th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

10th Army (Soviet Union)

10th Canadian Infantry Brigade

10th Division (Australia)

10th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

10th Indian Infantry Division

10th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

10th Infantry Division (Poland)

10th Marine Regiment (United States)

10th Motorized Cavalry Brigade (Poland)

10th Mountain Division (United States)

10th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

10th Reconnaissance Group (United States)

10th SS Panzer Division Frundsberg

10TP

110th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

110th Rifle Division

112 Gripes about the French

114th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

116th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

118th General Hospital US Army

11th (East Africa) Division

11th Airborne Division (United States)

11th Armored Division (United States)

11th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

11th Army (Soviet Union)

11th Army Group

11th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

11th Guards Army

11th Indian Infantry Division

11th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

11th SS Panzer Army

11th SS Volunteer Panzergrenadier Division Nordland

11th/28th Battalion, Royal Western Australia Regiment

12th Alpini Regiment

12.8 cm FlaK 40

12.8 cm PaK 44

120 mm M1 gun

121st Engineer Battalion (United States)

122 mm gun M1931/37 (A-19)

122 mm howitzer M1909/37

122 mm howitzer M1910/30

122 mm howitzer M1938 (M-30)

12th (Eastern) Division

12th Armored Division (United States)

12th Army (Soviet Union)

12th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

12th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

12th Infantry Regiment (United States)

12th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend

13 JG 52

13 Rue Madeleine

13. Unterseebootsflottille

13.2 mm Hotchkiss machine gun

138mm/40 Modèle 1927 gun

13th Airborne Division (United States)

13th Armored Division (United States)

13th Army (Soviet Union)

13th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

13th Foreign Legion Demi-Brigade

13th Guards Rifle Division

13th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

13th Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Handschar (1st Croatian)

140th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

141st Reserve Division (Germany)

142nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

143rd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

148th Reserve Division (Germany)

14th Armored Division (United States)

14th Army (Soviet Union)

14th Army involvement in Transnistria

14th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

14th Indian Infantry Division

14th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

14th Infantry Division (Poland)

14th Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

14th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

14th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Galicia (1st Ukrainian)

15 cm Kanone 18

15 cm sFH 13

15 cm sFH 18

15 cm sIG 33

150th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

150th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

151st Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

152 mm gun M1910/30

152 mm gun M1910/34

152 mm gun M1935 (Br-2)

152 mm howitzer-gun M1937 (ML-20)

152 mm howitzer M1909/30

152 mm howitzer M1910/37

152 mm howitzer M1938 (M-10)

152 mm howitzer M1943 (D-1)

152 mm mortar M1931 (NM)

152nd Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

153rd Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

153rd Rifle Division

154th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

155 mm Long Tom

15th (Scottish) Division

15th Airborne Corps

15th Army Group

15th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

15th Infantry Division (Poland)

15th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Latvian)

16 inch Coast Gun M1919

16"/50 caliber Mark 7 gun

161st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

163rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

164th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

164th Infantry Regiment (United States)

169th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

16th Armored Division (United States)

16th Battalion, Royal Western Australia Regiment

16th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

16th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

16th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

16th SS Panzergrenadier Division Reichsführer-SS

17 cm Kanone 18

176th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

17th Airborne Division (United States)

17th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

17th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

17th Infantry Division (India)

17th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

17th SS Panzergrenadier Division Götz von Berlichingen

183rd Volksgrenadier Division (Germany)

184th Rifle Division

18th Army (Soviet Union)

18th Army Group

18th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

18th Infantry Division (France)

18th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

18th Infantry Division (Poland)

18th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

1938 Changsha Fire

1939-40 Winter Offensive

1939 Tarnow rail station bomb attack

193rd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

1940-1944 insurgency in Chechnya

1941 (film)

1941 Iraqi coup d'état

1941 Odessa massacre

1942 (video game)

1942 Luxembourgian general strike

1942: Joint Strike

1942: The Pacific Air War

1943 Naples post office bombing

1943 steel cent

1943: The Battle of Midway

1944-1945 killings in Bačka

1944 in France

1944: The Loop Master

1945 (Conroy novel)

1945 (Gingrich and Forstchen novel)

1945 Prime Minister's Resignation Honours

19th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

19th Infantry Division (India)

19th Infantry Division Gavninana

19th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

19th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (2nd Latvian)

1st (African) Division

1st Air Fleet of the Imperial Japanese Navy

1st Armored Division (France)

1st Armored Division (United States)

1st Armoured Brigade (Poland)

1st Armoured Brigade (United Kingdom)

1st Armoured Division (Australia)

1st Armoured Division (Poland)

1st Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

1st Armoured Reconnaissance Brigade (United Kingdom)

1st Baltic Front

1st Belgrade Special Combat detachment

1st Belorussian Front

1st Canadian Armoured Brigade

1st Canadian Infantry Division

1st Canadian Tank Brigade

1st Cavalry Army (Soviet Union)

1st Cavalry Division (United States)

1st Colonial Infantry Division (France)

1st Cossack Division

1st Czechoslovak Armoured Brigade

1st Division (Australia)

1st Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

1st Far East Front

1st Free French Division

1st Grenadiers Division (Poland)

1st Guards Army (Soviet Union)

1st Guards Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

1st Guards Special Rifle Corps

1st Guards Tank Army (Soviet Union)

1st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

1st Infantry Division (Slovak Republic)

1st Infantry Division (South Africa)

1st Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

1st Infantry Division (United States)

1st Legions Infantry Division (Poland)

1st Light Cavalry Division (France)

1st Light Division (Germany)

1st Light Mechanized Division (France)

1st Marine Division (United States)

1st Marine Infantry Parachute Regiment

1st Moroccan Infantry Division

1st Motor Machine Gun Brigade

1st Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

1st Naval Infantry Division (Germany)

1st Operations Group

1st Panzer Army

1st Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

1st Parachute Army (Germany)

1st Parachute Battalion (Australia)

1st Parachute Division (Germany)

1st Photo Squadron (Detachment C)

1st Red Banner Army

1st Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

1st Shock Army

1st Ski Division (Germany)

1st Special Service Brigade (United kingdom)

1st SS Division Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler

1st Tank Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

1st Ukrainian Front

2-inch mortar

2 Alpine Division Tridentina

2nd Engineer Regiment (Italy)

2 cm FlaK 30

2 cm KwK 30

2nd Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

2 or 3 Things I Know About Him

2. Jagd-Division

2.8 cm sPzB 41

2/11th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/12th Field Ambulance (Australia)

2/18th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/1st Australian Infantry Battalion

2/25th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/2nd Australian Infantry Battalion

2/3rd Australian Infantry Battalion

2/4th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/5th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/6th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/6th Cavalry Commando Regiment (Australia)

2/7th Australian Infantry Battalion

2/8th Australian Infantry Battalion

20 mm AA Machine Cannon Carrier Truck

20 mm Anti-Aircraft Tank "Ta-Se"

200th Division (National Revolutionary Army)

201st Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

202nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

203 mm howitzer M1931 (B-4)

203mm/50 Modèle 1924 gun

203mm/55 Modèle 1931 gun

205th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

206th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

207th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

208th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

208th Rifle Division

20th Armored Division (United States)

20th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

20th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

20th Infantry Division (India)

20th Infantry Division (Poland)

20th Mountain Army (Wehrmacht)

20th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

20th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Estonian)

21 cm Mörser 18

210 mm gun M1939 (Br-17)

210th Coastal Defense Division (Germany)

210th Independent Infantry Brigade (Home)

212th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

214th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

216th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

218th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

21st Army (Wehrmacht)

21st Army Group

21st Infantry Division (France)

21st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

21st Mountain Infantry Division (Poland)

21st Norwegian Army (Germany)

21st Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

21st Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Skanderbeg (1st Albanian)

223rd Independent Infantry Brigade (Home)

22nd Air Landing Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

22nd Army (Soviet Union)

22nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

22nd Infantry Division (France)

22nd Mountain Infantry Division (Poland)

22nd Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

22nd SS Volunteer Cavalry Division Maria Theresia

230th Coastal Defense Division (Germany)

23rd (Northumbrian) Division

23rd Army (Soviet Union)

23rd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

23rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

23rd Infantry Division (India)

23rd Infantry Division (Poland)

23rd Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

23rd Waffen Mountain Division of the SS Kama

240 mm howitzer M1

240mm/50 Modèle 1902 gun

243rd Static Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

246th Volksgrenadier Division (Wehrmacht)

24th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

24th Infantry Division (United States)

24th Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

24th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

24th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

25 Cent WWII (Dutch coin)

25 mm automatic air defense gun M1940 (72-K)

25 mm Hotchkiss anti-aircraft gun

25 mm Hotchkiss anti-tank gun

25. Unterseebootsflottille

25th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

25th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

25th Infantry Division (India)

25th Infantry Division (United States)

25th Motorized Division (France)

25th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

25th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

25th SS Grenadier Division Hunyadi (1st Hungarian)

25th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Hunyadi (1st Hungarian)

25th/49th Battalion, Royal Queensland Regiment

26th Armoured Brigade (United Kingdom)

26th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

26th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

26th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

26th Infantry Division (United States)

26th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (2nd Hungarian)

270th Rifle Division

273rd Reserve Panzer Division

275th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

277th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

27th Armoured Brigade

27th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

27th Guards Rifle Division

27th Home Army Infantry Division (Poland)

27th Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

27th Infantry Division (Poland)

27th Infantry Division (Sila)

27th Infantry Division (United States)

27th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

27th Truck-Moveable Division (Brescia)

281st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

286th Security Division (Germany)

289th Military Police Company

28th Armoured Brigade (United Kingdom)

28th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

28th Infantry Division (Poland)

28th Infantry Division (United States)

28th Jäger Division (Wehrmacht)

292nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

299th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

29th Armoured Brigade (United Kingdom)

29th Army (Soviet Union)

29th Flight Training Wing

29th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

29th Infantry Division (United States)

29th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Italian)

2nd (African) Division

2nd Armored Division (France)

2nd Armored Division (United States)

2nd Armoured Division (Australia)

2nd Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

2nd Armoured Regiment (Poland)

2nd Belorussian Front

2nd Canadian Armoured Brigade

2nd Canadian Infantry Division

2nd Cavalry Division (United States)

2nd Division (Australia)

2nd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

2nd Division (Norway)

2nd Far Eastern Front

2nd Guards Army (Soviet Union)

2nd Guards Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

2nd Guards Mixed Brigade (Japan)

2nd Guards Tank Army (Soviet Union)

2nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

2nd Infantry Division (India)

2nd Infantry Division (South Africa)

2nd Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

2nd Infantry Division (United States)

2nd Infantry Regiment (United States)

2nd Light Cavalry Division (France)

2nd Light Division (Germany)

2nd Light Mechanized Division (France)

2nd London Infantry Division

2nd Marine Division (United States)

2nd Marine Regiment (United States)

2nd Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

2nd Naval Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

2nd North African Infantry Division

2nd Panzer Army

2nd Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

2nd Panzer Group

2nd Parachute Division (Germany)

2nd Red Banner Army

2nd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

2nd Shock Army

2nd SS Division Das Reich

2nd Tank Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

3 Alpine Division Julia

3rd Alpini Regiment

3 inch Gun M5

3rd Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

3"/50 caliber gun

3.7 cm FlaK 43

3.7 cm KwK 36

3.7 cm PaK 36

3.7 inch Mountain Howitzer

301 Military Hospital

301st Air Refueling Wing

302nd Static Infantry Division (Germany)

305 mm howitzer M1939 (Br-18)

305mm/45 Modèle 1906 gun

305th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

308th Armament Systems Wing

30th Armoured Brigade

30th Infantry Division (United States)

30th Mechanized Brigade (Ukraine)

30th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (1st Belarussian)

30th Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS (2nd Russian)

318th Fighter Group

31st Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

31st Guards Rifle Division

31st Infantry Division (United States)

322nd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

323d Flying Training Wing

324th Fighter Group

324th Rifle Division

326th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

32nd Infantry Division (France)

32nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

32nd Infantry Division (United States)

32nd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

33/5

330mm/50 Modèle 1931 gun

331st Bombardment Group

332d Fighter Group

332nd Static Infantry Division (Germany)

333d Bombardment Group

334th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

336th Training Group

33rd Army (Soviet Union)

33rd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

33rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

33rd Infantry Division (United States)

33rd Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

33rd Waffen Grenadier Division of the SS Charlemagne (1st French)

340mm/45 Modèle 1912 gun

340th Bombardment Group

345th Bomb Group

346th Bombardment Group

349th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

349th Squadron (Belgium)

34th Brigade (Australia)

34th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

34th Infantry Division (United States)

350th Squadron (Belgium)

351st Bomb Group

352d Fighter Group

352nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

357th Fighter Group

359th Fighter Group

35th Army (Soviet Union)

35th Infantry Division (United States)

35th SS and Police Grenadier Division

36 Hours (1965 film)

361st Fighter Group

365th Fighter Group

369th (Croatian) Reinforced Infantry Regiment

369th (Croatian) Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

36th Battalion (Australia)

36th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

36th Infantry Division (United States)

36th Infantry Regiment (Poland)

37 mm anti-tank gun M1930 (1-K)

37 mm automatic air defense gun M1939 (61-K)

37 mm Gun M3

37mm Gun M1

37th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

37th Infantry Division (United States)

37th SS Volunteer Cavalry Division Lützow

373rd (Croatian) Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

38 cm SKC 34 naval gun

380mm/45 Modèle 1935 gun

380th Bomb Group

381st Training Group

382d Bombardment Group

383d Bombardment Group

383rd Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

385th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

38th (Irish) Infantry Brigade (United Kingdom)

38th (Welsh) Division

38th Infantry Division (United States)

391st Bombardment Group

392nd (Croatian) Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

392nd Strategic Missile Wing

393d Bombardment Group

394th Bombardment Group

396th Bombardment Group

397th Bombardment Wing

399th Bombardment Group

39M Csaba

39th Battalion (Australia)

39th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

39th Infantry Division (India)

39th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

3d Armored Cavalry Regiment (United States)

3d Combat Cargo Group

3d United States Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard)

3M-54 Klub

3rd Algerian Infantry Division

3rd Armored Division (France)

3rd Armored Division (United States)

3rd Armoured Division (Australia)

3rd Army (Soviet Union)

3rd Battalion 3rd Marines

3rd Belorussian Front

3rd Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (United States)

3rd Canadian Infantry Division

3rd Division (Australia)

3rd Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

3rd Division (New Zealand)

3rd Guards Army (Soviet Union)

3rd Guards Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

3rd Guards Tank Army (Soviet Union)

3rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

3rd Infantry Division (South Africa)

3rd Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

3rd Infantry Division (United States)

3rd Light Division (Germany)

3rd Light Mechanized Division (France)

3rd Marine Division (United States)

3rd Motor Rifle Division

3rd Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

3rd North African Infantry Division

3rd Panzer Army

3rd Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

3rd Panzer Group

3rd Polish Infantry Brigade

3rd Shock Army (Soviet Union)

3rd SS Division Totenkopf

3rd Tank Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

3rd/4th County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters)

4 Alpine Division Cuneense

4th Alpini Regiment

4th Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

4"/50 caliber gun

4.2 cm PaK 41

4.5 inch Gun M1

40 cm/45 Type 94

40 M Turan I

400th Bombardment Group

405th Fighter Group

409th Bombardment Group

40th Air Expeditionary Wing

40th Army (Soviet Union)

40th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

40th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

40th Infantry Division (United States)

413th Fighter Group

414th Fighter Group

41st Infantry Division (France)

41st Infantry Division (United States)

42nd (East Lancashire) Division

42nd Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

42nd Infantry Division (United States)

43rd (Wessex) Infantry Division

43rd Infantry Division (United States)

441st Troop Carrier Group

443d Troop Carrier Group

444th Bombardment Group

449th Bombardment Wing

44th (Home Counties) Infantry Division

44th Airborne Division (India)

44th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

44th Infantry Division (United States)

45 mm anti-tank gun M1937 (53-K)

45 mm anti-tank gun M1942 (M-42)

453rd Bombardment Group

454th Bombardment Wing

456th Bomb Group

458th Bombardment Group

45th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

45th Infantry Division (United States)

45th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

460th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion (United States)

461st Bombardment Wing

462d Bombardment Group

463d Airlift Group

464th Tactical Airlift Wing

465th Bombardment Wing

466th Bombardment Group

467th Bombardment Group

468th Bombardment Group

46th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

46th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

47 mm APX anti-tank gun

470th Bombardment Group

477th Fighter Group

483d Composite Wing

489th Bombardment Group

48th (South Midland) Division

48th Armored Medical Battalion

490th Bombardment Group

491st Bombardment Group

493d Bombardment Group

494th Bombardment Group

49th (West Riding) Infantry Division

49th Hutsul Rifle Regiment

49th Parallel

4th Armored Division (United States)

4th Army (Soviet Union)

4th Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (United States)

4th Canadian (Armoured) Division

4th Canadian Armoured Brigade

4th Canadian Infantry Brigade

4th Cavalry Regiment (United States)

4th Combat Cargo Group

4th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

4th Fighter Group

4th Guards Army (Soviet Union)

4th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

4th Infantry Division (India)

4th Infantry Division (Poland)

4th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

4th Infantry Division (United States)

4th Infantry Regiment (United States)

4th Light Cavalry Division (France)

4th Luftwaffe Field Division (Germany)

4th Marine Division (United States)

4th Mixed Brigade (Imperial Japanese Army)

4th Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

4th North African Infantry Division

4th Panzer Army

4th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

4th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

4th SS Polizei Division

4th SS Volunteer Panzergrenadier Brigade Netherlands

4th Tank Army (Soviet Union)

4th Tank Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

4th Territorial Army Corps (Romania)

4th Ukrainian Front

5 Alpine Division Pusteria

5th Alpini Regiment

5 cm KwK 38

5 cm KwK 39

5 cm PaK 38

5th Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

5"/25 caliber gun

5"/38 caliber gun

5"/51 caliber gun

500th SS Parachute Battalion

501st Parachute Infantry Regiment (United States)

502d Bombardment Group

502nd Heavy Tank Battalion (Germany)

503rd heavy tank battalion (Germany)

504th Bombardment Group

509th heavy tank battalion (Germany)

509th Operations Group

50th (Northumbrian) Infantry Division

51st (Highland) Infantry Division (World War II)

51st Army (Soviet Union)

52nd (Lowland) Division

53rd (Welsh) Division

53rd Infantry Division (France)

5535 Annefrank

55th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

55th Infantry Division (France)

55th Infantry Division (Poland)

55th Operations Group

562nd Grenadier Division (Germany)

56th (London) Division

56th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

56th Field Artillery Command

56th Fighter Group

56th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

57 mm anti-tank gun M1943 (ZiS-2)

57th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

58th Army (Soviet Union)

58th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

596th Parachute Combat Engineer Company (United States)

59th Guards Rifle Division

5th Armored Division (France)

5th Armored Division (United States)

5th Army (Wehrmacht)

5th Army (Soviet Union)

5th Canadian (Armoured) Division

5th Canadian Division

5th Canadian Infantry Brigade

5th Cavalry Brigade (United Kingdom)

5th Division (Australia)

5th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

5th Guards Tank Army (Soviet Union)

5th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

5th Infantry Division (India)

5th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

5th Infantry Division (United States)

5th Light Cavalry Division (France)

5th Marine Division (United States)

5th Motorized Division (France)

5th Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

5th North African Infantry Division

5th Panzer Army

5th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

5th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

5th SS Panzergrenadier Division Wiking

5th SS Volunteer Sturmbrigade Wallonien

6 Alpine Division Alpi Graie

6th Alpini Regiment

6 inch 26 cwt howitzer

6th Mountain Artillery Regiment (Italy)

60 pounder

60th Infantry Division (France)

60th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

61st Infantry Division (France)

61st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

61st Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

62nd Army (Soviet Union)

62nd Battalion (Australia)

633 Squadron

63rd Army (Soviet Union)

63rd Infantry Division (United States)

64 Baker Street

65th Infantry Division (United States)

66th (East Lancashire) Infantry Division

66th Infantry Division (United States)

68th Infantry Division (France)

68th Observation Group

69th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

69th Infantry Division (United States)

6th Airlanding Brigade (United Kingdom)

6th Armored Division (United States)

6th Armoured Division (South Africa)

6th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

6th Army (Soviet Union)

6th Canadian Infantry Brigade

6th Canadian Infantry Division

6th Cavalry Regiment (United States)

6th Division (Australia)

6th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

6th Guards Tank Army

6th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

6th Infantry Division (Poland)

6th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

6th Infantry Division (United States)

6th Infantry Regiment (United States)

6th Luftwaffe Field Division (Germany)

6th Marine Division (United States)

6th Marine Division on Okinawa

6th Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

6th Panzer Army

6th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

6th Parachute Division (Germany)

6th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

6th SS Mountain Division Nord

6th SS Volunteer Sturmbrigade Langemarck

7th Alpini Regiment

7 cm Mountain Gun

7.5 cm FK 16 nA

7.5 cm FK 18

7.5 cm FK 38

7.5 cm FK 7M85

7.5 cm Infanteriegeschütz 37

7.5 cm Infanteriegeschütz 42

7.5 cm KwK 37

7.5 cm KwK 40

7.5 cm KwK 42

7.5 cm L/45 M/16 anti aircraft gun

7.5 cm L/45 M/32 anti aircraft gun

7.5 cm leichtes Infanteriegeschütz 18

7.5 cm Leichtgeschütz 40

7.5 cm PaK 39

7.5 cm PaK 40

7.5 cm PaK 41

7.5 cm PaK 97/38

7.62 cm PaK 36(r)

7.92 mm DS

700 Naval Air Squadron

709th Static Infantry Division (Germany)

70th Armor Regiment (United States)

70th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

70th Infantry Division (United States)

715th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

716th Static Infantry Division (Germany)

719th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

71st Infantry Division (France)

71st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

71st Infantry Division (United States)

71st Infantry Regiment (New York)

72nd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

72nd Mechanized Brigade (Ukraine)

73rd Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

74th Infantry Regiment (Poland)

75 mm gun (US)

75 mm Schneider-Danglis 06/09

758th Tank Battalion (United States)

75th Guards Rifle Division

75th Infantry Division (United States)

76 mm air defense gun M1938

76 mm divisional gun M1902/30

76 mm divisional gun M1936 (F-22)

76 mm divisional gun M1939 (USV)

76 mm divisional gun M1942 (ZiS-3)

76 mm gun M1

76 mm mountain gun M1938

76 mm regimental gun M1927

76 mm regimental gun M1943

761st Tank Battalion (United States)

76th Division (United States)

76th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

76th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

76th Reconnaissance Group

76th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

77th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

77th Infantry Division (United States)

78th Division (United States)

78th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

78th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

78th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

79th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

79th Fighter Group

79th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

79th Infantry Division (United States)

79th Light Anti-Aircraft Battery

7th Armored Division (United States)

7th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

7th Army (Wehrmacht)

7th Army (Soviet Union)

7th Canadian Infantry Brigade

7th Canadian Infantry Division

7th Cavalry Regiment (United States)

7th Division (Australia)

7th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

7th Field Artillery Regiment (United States)

7th Guards Army

7th Indian Infantry Division

7th Infantry Division (United States)

7th Marine Regiment (United States)

7th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

7th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

7th SS Volunteer Mountain Division Prinz Eugen

7TP

8th Alpini Regiment

8 cm FK M. 17

8 cm PAW 600

8 cm sGrW 34

8 inch Gun M1

8.8 cm KwK 36

8.8 cm KwK 43

8.8 cm PaK 43

805th Engineer Aviation Battalion (United States)

80th Division (United States)

80th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

80th Rifle Division

81st (West Africa) Division

81st Infantry Division (United States)

82-PM-37

82nd (West Africa) Division

82nd Airborne Division (United States)

83rd Infantry Division (Germany)

83rd Infantry Division (United States)

84 Avenue Foch

84th Division (United States)

85 mm air defense gun M1939 (52-K)

85th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

86th Infantry Division (United States)

87th Division (United States)

87th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

88 mm gun

88th Division (National Revolutionary Army)

88th Infantry Division (United States)

89th "Tamanyan" Rifle Division

89th Division (United States)

8th Armored Division (United States)

8th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

8th Army (Soviet Union)

8th Division (Australia)

8th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

8th Guards Army (Soviet Union)

8th Infantry Division (France)

8th Infantry Division (India)

8th Infantry Division (United Kingdom)

8th Infantry Division (United States)

8th Marine Regiment (United States)

8th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

8th SS Cavalry Division Florian Geyer

9th Alpini Regiment

9 Parachute Squadron RE

90 mm gun

904 Expeditionary Air Wing (United Kingdom)

90th Infantry Division (United States)

90th Light Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

914th Grenadier Regiment

916th Grenadier Regiment (Germany)

91st Bomb Group

91st Division (United States)

91st Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

92nd Infantry Division (United States)

93rd Infantry Division (United States)

94th Infantry Division (United States)

95th Bomb Group

95th Infantry Division (United States)

96th Infantry Division (United States)

97th Infantry Division (United States)

97th Mechanized Brigade (Ukraine)

98th Division (United States)

98th Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

999th Light Afrika Division (Germany)

99th Infantry Division (United States)

99th Light Infantry Division (Wehrmacht)

99th Rifle Division (Soviet Union)

9th (Highland) Infantry Division

9th Armored Division (United States)

9th Armoured Division (United Kingdom)

9th Army (Soviet Union)

9th Division (Australia)

9th Division (Imperial Japanese Army)

9th Infantry Division (India)

9th Infantry Division (Poland) (interwar)

9th Infantry Division (Soviet Union)

9th Infantry Division (United States)

9th Luftwaffe Field Division (Germany)

9th Motorized Division (France)

9th Mountain Division (Wehrmacht)

9th Panzer Division (Wehrmacht)

9th Parachute Division (Germany)

9th SS Panzer Division Hohenstaufen

Justus McKinstry

Justus McKinstry (July 6, 1814 – December 11, 1897) was a United States Army officer who served in the Second Seminole War and with merit in the Mexican–American War and in the Third Seminole War. He was appointed a brigadier general and assistant quartermaster in the Union Army in the early days of the American Civil War but his appointment expired without being confirmed by the United States Senate. His actual highest rank was major. He was suspended from his appointment and held under arrest starting November 13, 1861, although his confinement was expanded to the city limits of St. Louis, Missouri after February 22, 1862, in anticipation of a court martial in October 1862. He was convicted of graft, corruption and fraud in the quartermaster's department in the Department of the West. The court recommended his dismissal from the army. On January 28, 1863, after being held in arrest for more than a year, McKinstry was cashiered "for neglect and violation of duty to the prejudice of good order and military discipline." Despite the expiration of his brigadier general appointment without Senate confirmation, some sources, such as Ezra Warner, list McKinstry as a brigadier general. If so regarded, he was one of three Union Army generals who were cashiered. After his dismissal from the Union Army, McKinstry was a speculator and stock broker in New York City, 1864–1867, and land agent in Rolla, Missouri, 1867 – c. 1870, although he spent most of the rest of his life in reduced circumstances in St. Louis.

Task Force Kandahar

Task Force Kandahar (TFK) was the formation conducting the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission in Kandahar Province under ISAF Regional Command South. When it concluded its mission in summer 2011, the formation included a Canadian Forces battle group, three U.S. Army battalions (two of infantry and one of military police), an engineer regiment, a signal squadron, Operational Mentor and Liaison Teams (OMLTs), and contributions to Operational Mentor and Advisory Teams (OMATs) and the Police Operational Mentor and Liaison Team (P-OMLT).

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