2 ft and 600 mm gauge railways

Two foot and 600 mm gauge railways are narrow gauge railways with track gauges of 2 ft (610 mm) and 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in), respectively. Railways with similar, less common track gauges, such as 1 ft 11 34 in (603 mm) and 1 ft 11 12 in (597 mm), are grouped with 2 ft and 600 mm gauge railways.

C01364-9.2 inch howitzer Ypres 1917
A BL 9.2-inch howitzer with shells lined up on the ground recently delivered from the trench railway in the foreground during World War I.

Overview

Pilionbahn in milies
A steam outline Schöma diesel locomotive on the Pelion railway in Greece.
'Sea Lion', Groudle Glen Railway (All About Railways, Hartnell)
The Groudle Glen Railway Sea Lion locomotive c. 1910 on the Isle of Man.
OMEG 1914
The gasoline engine Crown Prince of the Otavi Mining and Railway Company in South West Africa (now Namibia). This railcar was able to reach a speed of 137 kilometres (85 mi) per hour.
Efteling Stoomtrein
The Efteling Steam Train Company, located in Efteling in the Netherlands, runs some locomotives that are more than a century old.

Most of these lines are tourist lines, which are often heritage railways or industrial lines, such as the Festiniog Railway in Wales and the Cripple Creek and Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad in Colorado.

World War I trench railways produced the greatest concentration of 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in) gauge railways to date. In preparation for World War II, the French Maginot Line and Alpine Line also used 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in) gauge railways for supply routes to the fixed border defenses.

Australia has over 4,000 kilometres (2,500 mi) of 2 ft (610 mm) gauge sugar cane railway networks in the coastal areas of Queensland, which carry more than 30 million tonnes of sugarcane a year.

Many 2 ft (610 mm) gauge and 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in) gauge railways are used in amusement parks and theme parks worldwide.

Exchange of rolling stock

The interchange of rolling stock between these similar track gauges occasionally occurred; for example, the South African Class NG15 2-8-2 locomotives started their career on the 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in) gauge. The Otavi Mining and Railway Company in South-West Africa (now Namibia) were transferred to the 2 ft gauge railways in South Africa and currently some surviving locomotives reside in Wales on the 1 ft 11 12 in (597 mm) gauge Welsh Highland Railway and the 1 ft 11 34 in (603 mm) gauge Brecon Mountain Railway.

Installations

Country/territory Railway Gauge
Albania 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Angola 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Argentina 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Australia 2 ft (610 mm)
Austria 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Belarus 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Belgium 2 ft (610 mm)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Brazil
  • Perus-Pirapora Railway (operating)
  • São Mateus Railway (defunct)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Brunei 2 ft (610 mm)
Bulgaria 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Burundi 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Cambodia 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Canada 2 ft (610 mm)
Cameroon 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Central African Republic 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Chile 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
China 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Comoros 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Czech Republic
  • Dráha Kateřina; 15 km (operating)
  • Kolínská řepařská drážka; 10.6 km (operating)
  • Mladějovská železnice; 10.5 km (operating)
  • Muzeum Průmyslových Železnic (Zbýšov, Czech Republic) ca 2.7 km (operating) (converted from standard gauge)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Democratic Republic of the Congo 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Denmark 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Egypt 2 ft (610 mm)
Eritrea 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Estonia 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Falkland Islands 2 ft (610 mm)
Fiji 2 ft (610 mm)
Finland 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
France 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Germany 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Greece 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Greenland 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Guatemala
  • Transcostero (located in Xetulul) (operating)
2 ft (610 mm)
Hong Kong 2 ft (610 mm)
Hungary 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Iceland 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
India 2 ft (610 mm)
Indonesia
  • Sugar cane railways in Java in Cepiring (defunct), Jatibarang (operating), Jatiwangi (defunct), Jatiwarna (Bekasi) (defunct), Kalijereng (East Jakarta) (defunct), Pandji (operating), Pangka (operating), Soedhono (operating), Sragi (operating), Sukamakmur (Bogor) (defunct) and Tulangan (operating)[9]
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Isle of Man 2 ft (610 mm)
Italy
  • Cividale-Tarcetta Railway (defunct)
  • Montevecchio Sciria-San Gavino Monreale Railway (defunct)
  • Porto Empedocle-Lucia (defunct)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Japan 2 ft (610 mm)
Laos 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Latvia 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Lithuania 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Macedonia
  • Skopje - Ohrid line; 167 km (partially converted to standard gauge)
  • Gradsko - Bitola (defunct)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Madagascar
  • Sugar cane, industrial and military railways[14] (defunct)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Mauritius
  • A network of sugar cane railways[15] (defunct)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Mexico 2 ft (610 mm)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Montenegro
  • Podgorica - Plavnica railway (defunct)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Morocco 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Mozambique 2 ft (610 mm)
Myanmar 2 ft (610 mm)
Namibia 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Nauru 2 ft (610 mm)
Netherlands 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
New Zealand 2 ft (610 mm)
Norway
  • Åmdals Verk Gruver;[17] 0.6 km (operating)
  • Gruvemuseet pa Litlabo[17] (operating)
  • Høyanger funicular (operating)
  • Kristiansand Kanonmuseum[17] (operating)
  • Lommedalsbanen;[17] 0.6 km (operating)
  • Sulitjelma Besøksgruve[17] (operating)
  • Stiftelsen Konnerudverket;[17] 0.5 km (operating)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Palestine 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Papua New Guinea 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Pakistan 2 ft (610 mm)
Poland 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Portugal
  • Comboio da Praia do Barril (operating)
  • Minicomboio da Caparica (operating)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Rwanda 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Somalia 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
South Africa 2 ft (610 mm)
South Korea
  • EcoLand Resort Forest Train[19] (located in EcoLand Theme Park) (operating)
2 ft (610 mm)
Spain
  • Ferrocarril Turístic de l'Alt Llobregat
  • Funicular de Capdella[20]
  • Funicular de Molinos[20] (private) (operating)[21]
  • Tren Minero de Utrillas [22]
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Sudan 2 ft (610 mm)
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Sweden 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Switzerland 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Taiwan 2 ft (610 mm)
Tanzania 2 ft (610 mm)
Thailand 2 ft (610 mm)
Togo 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
Turkey 600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in)
United Kingdom 2 ft (610 mm);
1 ft 11 34 in (603 mm);
600 mm (1 ft 11 58 in);
1 ft 11 12 in (597 mm)
United States 2 ft (610 mm)
Zimbabwe
  • Shurugwi Peak Railway[24][25] (operating)
2 ft (610 mm)

See also

References

  1. ^ The Very Special Electric Tramway in Valle Hermoso, Argentina
  2. ^ Railways of the Far South - The Ushuaia prison railway & the FCAF
  3. ^ World Wide Listing of Two foot, 1' 11 1/2", 600 mm (60cm) & 610mm Railroads (from archive.org) - Argentina
  4. ^ The Vennbahn: Belgium’s railway through Germany
  5. ^ Canadian Rail No, 439 - The Magazine of Canada's Railway History
  6. ^ "Niagara Rails - Other Lines". Archived from the original on 2014-02-21. Retrieved 2014-02-17.
  7. ^ Exploration Place Museum and Science Centre - official website
  8. ^ a b c Railways of the Far South - Chiloe Island
  9. ^ World Wide Listing of Two foot, 1' 11 1/2", 600 mm (60cm) & 610mm Railroads (from archive.org) - Java
  10. ^ RailScape - Musashino-Mura
  11. ^ Musashino-Mura - official website
  12. ^ Steamlocomotive.info - Chiba
  13. ^ Narita Yume Bokujō Railway - official website
  14. ^ Industrial Heritage in Madagascar, 2012
  15. ^ Narrow Gauge Railway Relics in Mauritius, 2012
  16. ^ Preserved Narrow Gauge Steam in Mexico 2012, Part 2
  17. ^ a b c d e f "Directory of preserved narrow gauge railways in Norway". Archived from the original on 2014-02-22. Retrieved 2014-02-18.
  18. ^ Changa Manga Forest Railway
  19. ^ "Severn Lamb - News Archive". Archived from the original on 2011-12-02. Retrieved 2014-02-24.
  20. ^ a b c "Trams of the World 2017" (PDF). Blickpunkt Straßenbahn. January 24, 2017. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 16, 2017.
  21. ^ Listadotren.es - Funicular de Molinos (Lleida)
  22. ^ "Tren Minero de Utrillas". www.facebook.com. Retrieved 2018-07-24.
  23. ^ Funimag - "Die Puschlaver Geisterbahn" Cavaglia
  24. ^ 610 mm gauge Shurugwi Railway
  25. ^ Shurugwi Peak Railway, Zimbabwe
2 ft 6 in gauge railways in the United Kingdom

A list of two foot six inch gauge railways in the United Kingdom.

2 ft and 600 mm gauge railways in the United Kingdom

A list of 2 ft (610 mm), 1 ft 11 3⁄4 in (603 mm), 600 mm (1 ft 11 5⁄8 in), and 1 ft 11 1⁄2 in (597 mm) narrow-gauge railways in the United Kingdom.

2 ft gauge railroads in the United States

A list of 2 ft (610 mm) narrow-gauge railways in the United States.

2 ft gauge railways in Australia

A list of 2 ft (610 mm) narrow-gauge railways in Australia.

3 ft gauge railways in the United Kingdom

A list of 3 ft (914 mm) narrow-gauge railways in the United Kingdom.

The worldwide usage of locomotives on railways, including 3 ft (914 mm) gauge railways, has its origins in the United Kingdom in the early 19th century during the Industrial Revolution. In fact, in 1802, a 3 ft gauge plateway-type railway owned by the Coalbrookdale Company in England became the first railway in the world to have a locomotive designed and built for it. The locomotive's designer, Richard Trevithick, is credited with making the first recorded successful demonstration of a locomotive on rails (in 1804 on a different railway in Wales). 3 ft gauge locomotive-powered railways, along with other narrow-gauge railways of varying widths, would later become one of the most common railway gauges chosen for short-distance lines in the British Isles, such as those found in mines and industrial sites (see table below).

H0f gauge

H0f gauge (or H0i gauge) is a rail transport modelling scale representing Feldbahn-style 2 ft and 600 mm gauge railways using 1:87 HO scale running on Z gauge 6.5-millimetre (0.26 in) track. The Normen Europäischer Modellbahnen NEM 010 specification defines H0f for modelling gauges 400–650 millimetres (16–26 in), as part of the 1:87-scale family that includes narrow-gauge railway models using H0e gauge and metre-gauge railway models using H0m gauge.

HOn3½ gauge

HOn3​1⁄2 gauge represents the modelling of 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) gauge railways in HO scale, resulting in a model track gauge of 12 mm (0.472 in) (the same as H0m and TT scale). Trains are operated using direct current or Digital Command Control over realistic-looking two-rail track.

Railways that use the 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) gauge can be found in New Zealand, South Africa, Indonesia, Australia, Taiwan, Japan and others. Manufacturers of Australian outline models in this size include Haskell, Wuiske Promotions, Black Diamond and PGC, as well as Hollywood Foundries for mechanisms. CMD models and SARModel produce South African HOn3.5 models. Most Japanese and Taiwan HO scale models are made to run on 16.5mm gauge track and are made to 1/80 scale (Tomix, Kato and Tenshodo for Japan being the main brands and Haskell for Taiwan) but some small volume HOn3.5 kits and brass models are made for Japan with Imon being a major supplier.

List of track gauges

This list presents an overview of railway track gauges by size. A gauge is measured between the inner faces of the rails.

Ohrid line

The Ohrid line was a narrow gauge railway line in what is now the Republic of North Macedonia. It ran to a gauge of 600 mm (1 ft 11 5⁄8 in).

The route was:

Skopje – Gostivar – Kičevo – Podmolje - Ohrid, a distance of 167 kilometres (104 mi).The section from Skopje - Gostivar was converted to standard gauge in the 1950s. The remaining 600 mm lines were closed altogether in 1966. The standard gauge line now runs as far as Kičevo.Immediately before World War I, the area of Vardar Macedonia was part of Serbia, rather than Austria-Hungary. During the war it came under Bulgarian occupation. The railway was built as part of a military railway during this occupation and so was built to the Bulgarian 600 mm Feldbahn standards, rather than the 760 mm Bosnian gauge of the Austro-Hungarian railways that would later become so well known as part of narrow gauge railways in Yugoslavia. Construction of the 600 mm line between Gradsko and Drenovo began on 26 February 1916. Construction of the Ohrid line began that summer and by 1923 the line ran from the General Hanris station (today Gorce Petrov) on the western edge of Skopje, through to Ohrid.

The railway was operated by a number of 0-8-0T Brigadelok from German Heeresfeldbahn, described as the JŽ 99.4 class.1948, the beginning of the separatist Informbiro period, was a period of new investment in the line. The line to Kičevo was lifted and relaid as standard gauge, opening to Gostivar on 25 May 1952, and Kičevo in 1969. Conversion beyond this, to Ohrid, never took place and the narrow gauge line had closed by now.

One Brigadelok and three coaches are preserved outdoors at Kičevo. 99.4.084 is outside the railway museum in Belgrade. Another locomotive, 99.4.025 (Vulkan 3129 of 1917) was preserved for some years at the Lisice depot, in south-eastern Skopje.In the 1930s, the Italians considered this route for part of an integrated rail route from the Adriatic coast in Albania to the west of Lake Ohrid, through Podmolje and on to Tetovo and Skopje. In the 21st century, Albanian rail services ran as far as Pogradec, on the southern coast of the lake. Plans have been discussed to link this through to the old Ohrid route, and so to Skopje, although this now appears unlikely.

Rail transport modelling scales

Rail transport modelling uses a variety of scales (ratio between the real world and the model) to ensure scale models look correct when placed next to each other. Model railway scales are standardized worldwide by many organizations and hobbyist groups. Some of the scales are recognized globally, while others are less widespread and, in many cases, virtually unknown outside their circle of origin. Scales may be expressed as a numeric ratio (e.g. 1/87 or 1:87) or as letters defined in rail transport modelling standards (e.g. HO, OO, N, O, G, TT and Z.) The majority of commercial model railway equipment manufacturers base their offerings on Normen Europäischer Modellbahnen (NEM) or National Model Railroad Association (NMRA) standards in most popular scales.

Three foot six inch gauge railways in the United Kingdom

One of the first railways using 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) gauge track was the Little Eaton Gangway in England, constructed as a horse-drawn wagonway in 1795. Other 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) gauge wagonways in England and Wales were also built in the early 19th century. Also during this time, numerous tram networks were built in 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) gauge (see table below).

Minimum gauge
Narrow gauge
Standard gauge
Broad gauge
Gauge differences
Categories

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