2C-G

2C-G is a psychedelic phenethylamine of the 2C family. First synthesized by Alexander Shulgin, it is sometimes used as an entheogen. It has structural and pharmacodynamic properties similar to 2C-D and Ganesha. Like many of the phenethylamines in PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved), 2C-G and its homologues have only been taken by Shulgin and a small test group, making it difficult to ensure completeness when describing effects.

2C-G
2C-G-Chemdraw
2C-G-3d-sticks
2C-G animation
Names
IUPAC name
3,4-Dimethyl-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
Properties
C12H19NO2
Molar mass 209.28 g/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Chemistry

2C-G is 3,4-dimethyl-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine, with the formula C12H19NO2.

Dosage and effects

In Shulgin's book PiHKAL, the dosage range is listed as 20 to 35 mg. Effects are similar to the related Ganesha, and are extremely long lasting; the duration is 18–30 hours. Visual effects are muted or absent, and it is described in PiHKAL as an "insight-enhancer".[1] Unlike other members of the 2C family, 2C-G is nearly as potent as its amphetamine cousin.

Homologues

Several homologues of 2C-G were also synthesized by Shulgin. These include 2C-G-3, 2C-G-5, and 2C-G-N. Some, such as 2C-G-1, 2C-G-2, 2C-G-4, and 2C-G-6 are possible to synthesize in principle but impossible or extraordinarily difficult to do so in practice.

2C-G-1
2C-G-1
2C-G-2
2C-G-2
2C-G-3-Chemdraw
2C-G-3
2C-G-4
2C-G-4
2C-G-5
2C-G-5
2C-G-6
2C-G-6
2C-G-N-Chemdraw
2C-G-N

Law

2C-G and all of its homologues are unscheduled and uncontrolled in the United States, but possession and sales of 2C-G (and homologues) will probably be prosecuted under the Federal Analog Act because of their structural similarities to 2C-B.

Canada

As of October 31st, 2016; 2C-G is a controlled substance (Schedule III) in Canada. http://gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2016/2016-05-04/html/sor-dors72-eng.php

United Kingdom

2C-G and all other compounds featuring in PiHKAL are Class A drugs in the United Kingdom.

See also

References

  1. ^ Shulgin, Alexander; Ann Shulgin (September 1991). PiHKAL: A Chemical Love Story. Berkeley, California: Transform Press. ISBN 0-9630096-0-5. OCLC 25627628.

External links

2,4,5-Trimethoxyphenethylamine

2,4,5-Trimethoxyphenethylamine (2C-O or 2C-OMe) or is a phenethylamine of the 2C family and was first synthesized by Jansen in 1931. It is a positional isomer of the drug mescaline (3,4,5-trimethoxy) and is structurally similar to the drug 2C-D.

25G-NBOMe

25G-NBOMe (NBOMe-2C-G) is a derivative of the phenethylamine hallucinogen 2C-G, which acts as a highly potent partial agonist for the human 5-HT2A receptor.

2C-Se

2C-Se is a lesser-known psychedelic drug. It was originally named by Alexander Shulgin as described in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved). Shulgin considered 2C-Se to be around three times the potency of mescaline, but was too concerned about toxicity to test it extensively, though he considered it noteworthy as the only psychedelic drug to contain a selenium atom.

2C-T-13

2C-T-13 or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-(β-methoxyethylthio)phenethylamine is a psychedelic phenethylamine of the 2C family. It was presumably first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin and reported in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved).

2C-T-15

2C-T-15 or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-(β-cyclopropylthio)phenethylamine is a psychedelic phenethylamine of the 2C family. It was presumably first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin and reported in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved).

2C-T-17

2C-T-17 or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-(β-secbutylthio)phenethylamine is a psychedelic phenethylamine of the 2C family. It was presumably first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin and reported in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved).

2C-T-19

2C-T-19 or 2,5-dimethoxy-4-butylthiophenethylamine is a psychedelic phenethylamine of the 2C family. It was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin.

2C-YN

2C-YN is an analog of phenethylamine that can be synthesized from 2C-I. Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of 2C-YN, although Daniel Trachsel lists it as having a dosage of around 50mg and a duration of around 2 hours, with relatively mild psychedelic effects.

2C-iP

2C-iP (also known as Jelena) is a relatively potent and long acting psychedelic phenethylamine and compound from the 2C family that was first synthesized by Dmitri Ger and has been sold online as a designer drug.It is a structural analog of 2C-P.

2C (psychedelics)

2C (2C-x) is a general name for the family of psychedelic phenethylamines containing methoxy groups on the 2 and 5 positions of a benzene ring. Most of these compounds also carry lipophilic substituents at the 4 position, usually resulting in more potent and more metabolically stable and longer acting compounds. Most of the currently known 2C compounds were first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin in the 1970s and 1980s and published in his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved). Shulgin also coined the term 2C, being an acronym for the 2 carbon atoms between the benzene ring and the amino group.

3C-BZ

3C-BZ, or 4-benzyloxy-3,5-dimethoxyamphetamine, is a lesser-known psychedelic drug and a substituted amphetamine. 3C-BZ was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. In his book PiHKAL, the dosage range is listed as 25–200 mg, and the duration as 18–24 hours. According to anecdotal reports from the substance's entry in PiHKAL, 3C-BZ's effects can vary significantly, ranging from intensified emotions and strange dreams, to effects similar to those of LSD or TMA. Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of 3C-BZ.

6-Isopropyl-6-nor-lysergic acid diethylamide

6-Isopropyl-6-nor-lysergic acid diethylamide (IP-LAD) is an analog of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) developed by the team of David E. Nichols. In studies on mice, it was found to be approximately 40% the potency of LSD, compared to the 60% increase in potency seen with ETH-LAD and roughly equivalent potency in AL-LAD and PRO-LAD.

Cyclopropylmescaline

CPM, or 4-cyclopropylmethoxy-3,5-dimethoxy-phenethylamine, is a lesser-known psychedelic drug. CPM was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. In his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved), the dosage range is listed as 60–80 mg, and the duration listed as 12–18 hours. CPM produces powerful closed-eye imagery, visuals, and fantasies. It also causes enhancement of music. Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of CPM.

Ganesha (psychedelic)

Ganesha, or 2,5-dimethoxy-3,4-dimethylamphetamine, is a lesser-known psychedelic drug. It is also a substituted amphetamine. It was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. In his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved), the dosage range is listed as 24–32 mg. The drug is usually taken orally, although other routes such as rectally may also be used. Ganesha is synthesized from 2,5-dimethoxy-3,4-dimethylbenzaldehyde. Ganesha is the amphetamine analogue of 2C-G. It is a particularly long lasting drug, with the duration listed in PiHKAL as being 18 – 24 hours, which might make it undesirable to some users. It is named after the Hindu deity, Ganesha. Very little is known about the dangers or toxicity of Ganesha. Effects of Ganesha include:

Strong closed-eye visuals

An increased appreciation of music

Powerful relaxation and tranquility

Methallylescaline

Methallylescaline (4-methylallyloxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine) is a lesser-known psychedelic drug. It is also the 4-methyl analog of allylescaline. Methallylescaline was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. In his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved), the dosage range is listed as 40–65 mg and the duration is listed as 12–16 hours. Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of methallylescaline.

PRO-LAD

PRO-LAD is an analogue of LSD. It is described by Alexander Shulgin in the book TiHKAL. PRO-LAD is a psychedelic drug similar to LSD, and is around as potent as LSD itself with an active dose reported at between 100 and 200 micrograms.

PiHKAL

PiHKAL: A Chemical Love Story is a book by Dr. Alexander Shulgin and Ann Shulgin, published in 1991. The subject of the work is psychoactive phenethylamine chemical derivatives, notably those that act as psychedelics and/or empathogen-entactogens. The main title, PiHKAL, is an acronym that stands for "Phenethylamines I Have Known And Loved".

The book is arranged into two parts, the first part being a fictionalized autobiography of the couple and the second part describing 179

different psychedelic compounds (most of which Shulgin discovered himself), including detailed synthesis instructions, bioassays, dosages, and other commentary.

The second part was made freely available by Shulgin on Erowid while the first part is available only in the printed text. While the reactions described are beyond the ability of people with a basic chemistry education, some tend to emphasize techniques that do not require difficult-to-obtain chemicals. Notable among these are the use of mercury-aluminum amalgam (an unusual but easy to obtain reagent) as a reducing agent and detailed suggestions on legal plant sources of important drug precursors such as safrole.

Proscaline

Proscaline, or 4-propoxy-3,5-DMPEA, is a psychedelic and hallucinogenic drug, used by some as an entheogen. It has structural and pharmacodynamic properties similar to the drugs mescaline, isoproscaline, and escaline.

TOMSO

TOMSO, or 2-methoxy-4-methyl-5-methylsulfinylamphetamine, is a lesser-known psychedelic drug and a substituted amphetamine. TOMSO was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. In his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved), the dosage range is listed as 100–150 mg, and the duration listed as 10–16 hours. TOMSO is inactive on its own; it is activated with the consumption of alcohol. It produces intense time distortion and a threshold. Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of TOMSO.

Psychedelics
(5-HT2A
agonists)
Dissociatives
(NMDAR
antagonists)
Deliriants
(mAChR
antagonists)
Others
Drugs from PiHKAL

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