29th Tony Awards

The 29th Annual Tony Awards ceremony was held on April 20, 1975, at the Winter Garden Theatre in New York City, and broadcast by ABC television. Hosts/Performers/Presenters were Larry Blyden, George S. Irving, Larry Kert, Carol Lawrence, Michele Lee, Bernadette Peters and Bobby Van.

29th Tony Awards
DateApril 20, 1975
LocationWinter Garden Theatre, New York City, New York
Hosted byLarry Blyden, George S. Irving, Larry Kert, Carol Lawrence, Michele Lee, Bernadette Peters and Bobby Van
Television/radio coverage
NetworkABC

The ceremony

The theme centered on the Winter Garden Theatre, where many of the greatest stars in theatrical history began their careers.

Presenters: Jack Albertson, Eve Arden, Fred Astaire, Milton Berle, Ray Bolger, Carol Channing, Clifton Davis, Buddy Ebsen, Jack Haley Sr., Angela Lansbury, Jack Lemmon, John V. Lindsay, Cleavon Little, Walter Matthau, Vincente Minnelli, Carl Reiner, Rosalind Russell, Joe Smith, Jean Stapleton.

Performers: Clive Baldwin, Joey Faye, Angela Lansbury, Alexis Smith.

Musicals represented:

  • Mame ("Mame" - Angela Lansbury and Men)
  • Follies ("The Story of Lucy and Jessie" - Alexis Smith and Dancers)
  • Gypsy ("Everything's Coming up Roses" - Angela Lansbury and Company)

Winners and nominees

Winners are in bold

Best Play Best Musical
Best Book of a Musical Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre
Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play
Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical
Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Play Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play
Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical
Best Direction of a Play Best Direction of a Musical
Best Choreography Best Scenic Design
Best Costume Design Best Lighting Design

Theatre Award '75 Winner

External links

30th Tony Awards

The 30th Annual Tony Awards was held at the Shubert Theatre on April 18, 1976, and broadcast by ABC television. Hosts were Eddie Albert, Richard Burton, Jane Fonda, Diana Rigg, George C. Scott and Trish Van Devere.

47th Academy Awards

The 47th Academy Awards were presented Tuesday, April 8, 1975, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. The ceremonies were presided over by Bob Hope, Shirley MacLaine, Sammy Davis Jr., and Frank Sinatra. This was the last year NBC aired the ceremonies before ABC secured broadcasting rights, which they still hold to this day.

The success of The Godfather Part II was notable; it received twice as many Oscars as its predecessor (six) and duplicated its feat of three Best Supporting Actor nominations (as of the 90th Academy Awards, the last film to receive three nominations in a single acting category). Between the two of them, father and son Carmine and Francis Ford Coppola won four awards, with Carmine winning for Best Original Dramatic Score (with Nino Rota) and Francis for Picture, Director, and Best Screenplay Adapted from Other Material (with Mario Puzo).

This was the only Oscars where all nominees in one category were released by the same studio: all five Best Costume Design nominations were for films released by Paramount Pictures.

Doris Abrahams

Doris Cole Abrahams (January 29, 1921 – February 17, 2009) was a theater producer who won two Tony Awards for Peter Shaffer's play Equus and Tom Stoppard's Travesties.Doris Cole was born in the Bronx to a magician father who ran a magic store. She grew up in Manhattan and Brookline, Massachusetts, and started in theater by sweeping stage floors and acting in summer stock performances. In 1945, while still in her teens, she became the producer of Blue Holiday, an all-black Broadway variety show that ran for eight performances at the Belasco Theater, starring Katherine Dunham, Ethel Waters and Josh White.She married Gerald M. Abrahams, the chairman of the luxury clothing manufacturer Aquascutum and returned with him to London. There, the elaborate parties she prepared for her husband's clients allowed her to join with Oscar Lewenstein Productions, where she was involved with plays such as Semi-Detached with Laurence Olivier, as well as the Albert Finney vehicles Billy Liar as Luther. She started Albion Productions in the mid-1960s, putting on a total of eight plays in the West End theatre, among them Tom Stoppard's Enter a Free Man in 1968 and Travesties in 1974.Returning to New York City and Broadway in 1974, she co-produced Equus with Kermit Bloomgarden at the Plymouth Theatre. Starring Anthony Hopkins as the psychiatrist with a patient who has a pathological obsession with horses, it was honored as best play at the 29th Tony Awards and the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play went to John Dexter. Her 1975 Broadway production of Travesties, co-produced with Burry Fredrik and David Merrick, won that year's Tony Award for best play.A resident of Manhattan, Abrahams died there at age 88 on February 17, 2009 due to heart failure. She was survived by two daughters, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Her husband had died in 1999.

Special Tony Award

The Special Tony Award category includes the Lifetime Achievement Award and Special Tony Award. These are non-competitive honorary awards, and the titles have changed over the years. The Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre is to "honor an individual for the body of his or her work." (The Tony Award for Best Special Theatrical Event was a competitive award, given from 2001 to 2009.) Another non-competitive Tony award is the Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre, to "recognize the achievements of individuals and organizations that do not fit into any of the competitive categories."

Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical

The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical is awarded to the actor who was voted as the best actor in a musical play, whether a new production or a revival. The award has been given since 1948, but the nominees who did not win have only been publicly announced since 1956.

Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play

The Tony Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Play is an honor presented at the Tony Awards, a ceremony established in 1947 as the Antoinette Perry Awards for Excellence in Theatre, to actors for quality leading roles in a Broadway play. The awards are named after Antoinette Perry, an American actress who died in 1946. Honors in several categories are presented at the ceremony annually by the Tony Award Productions, a joint venture of The Broadway League and the American Theatre Wing, to "honor the best performances and stage productions of the previous year." Despite the award first being presented in 1947, there were no nominees announced until 1956.

Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical

The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical is awarded to the best actress in a musical, whether a new production or a revival. The award has been given since 1948, but the nominees who did not win have only been publicly announced since 1956.

Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical

The Tony Award for Best Book of a Musical is awarded to librettists of the spoken, non-sung dialogue, and storyline of a musical play. Eligibility is restricted to works with original narrative framework; plotless revues and revivals are ineligible. This award was originally called the Tony Award for Best Author, until musicals were split off from dramas.

Tony Award for Best Choreography

The Tony Award for Best Choreography is awarded to acknowledge the contributions of choreographers in both musicals and plays. The award has been given since 1947, but nominees were not announced until 1956.

Tony Award for Best Costume Design

These are the winners and nominees for the Tony Award for Best Costume Design. The award was first presented in 1947 and included both plays and musicals. In 1961, and since 2005 the category was divided into Costume Design in a Play and Costume Design in a Musical with each genre receiving its own award.

Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical

This is a list of winners and nominations for the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Musical. Prior to 1960, category for direction included plays and musicals.

Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play

The Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play has been given since 1960. Before 1960 there was only one award for both play direction and musical direction, then in 1960 the award was split into two categories: Dramatic and Musical. In 1976 the Dramatic category was renamed to Play. For pre-1960 direction awards please reference Tony Award for Best Director.

Tony Award for Best Featured Actor in a Musical

This is a list of the winners and nominations of Tony Award for the Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical. It is the equivalent to the Best Supporting Actor award at the Academy Awards. The award has been given since 1947, but the nominees who did not win have only been publicly announced since 1956.

Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical

The Tony Award for Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical has been presented since 1950. The award was not given at the first three Tony Award ceremonies. Nominees were not announced publicly until 1956.

Tony Award for Best Lighting Design

This is a list of winners and nominations for the Tony Award for Best Lighting Design for outstanding lighting design of a play or musical. The award was first presented in 1970. Since 2005, the category was divided into Lighting Design in a Play and Lighting Design in a Musical with each genre receiving its own award.

Tony Award for Best Musical

The Tony Awards are yearly awards that recognize achievement in live Broadway theatre. The award for Best Musical is one of the ceremony's longest-standing awards, having been presented each year since 1949. The award goes to the producers of the winning musical. A musical is eligible for consideration in a given year if it has not previously been produced on Broadway and is not "determined... to be a 'classic' or in the historical or popular repertoire."

Best Musical is the final award presented at the Tony Awards ceremony. Excerpts from the musicals that are nominated for this award are usually performed during the ceremony before this award is presented.

This is a list of winners and nominations for the Tony Award for Best Musical.

Tony Award for Best Original Score

The Tony Award for Best Original Score is the Tony Award given to the composers and lyricists of the best original score written for a musical or play in that year. The score consists of music and lyrics. To be eligible, a score must be written specifically for the theatre and must be original; compilations of non-theatrical music or compilations of earlier theatrical music are not eligible for consideration.

Tony Award for Best Play

The Tony Award for Best Play (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theatre, including musical theatre, honoring productions on Broadway in New York City. There was no award in the Tonys' first year. All My Sons has been incorrectly categorized as the Best Play of 1947, but it won the Best Author award for Arthur Miller. The following year Mister Roberts received the first Tony Award as Best Play. The award goes to the authors and the producers of the play.

Tony Award for Best Scenic Design

This is a list of winners and nominations for the Tony Award for Best Scenic Design for outstanding set design of a play or musical. The award was first presented in 1947. In 1960, 1961, and since 2005, the category was divided into Scenic Design in a Play and Scenic Design in a Musical with each genre receiving its own award.

Play
Musical
Special (non-competitive)
Retired
Ceremonies

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