29th Annual Grammy Awards

The 29th Annual Grammy Awards were held on February 24, 1987, at Shrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, California. They recognized accomplishments by musicians from the previous year.[1][2]

Paul Simon won Album of the Year for Graceland, and Burt Bacharach and Carole Bayer Sager won Song of the Year for "That's What Friends Are For".

29th Annual Grammy Awards
DateFebruary 24, 1987
LocationShrine Auditorium, Los Angeles, California
Hosted byBilly Crystal
Television/radio coverage
NetworkCBS

Award winners

Blues

Children's

Classical

Comedy

Composing and arranging

Country

Folk

Gospel

Historical

Jazz

Latin

Musical show

Music video

New Age

Packaging and notes

Polka

Pop

Production and engineering

R&B

Reggae

Rock

Spoken

References

  1. ^ "Simon's controversial album wins most prestigious Grammy". The Deseret News. 25 February 1987. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
  2. ^ "1986 Grammy Award Winners". Grammy.com. Retrieved 1 May 2011.
All I Need Is a Miracle

"All I Need Is a Miracle" is a song performed by English pop rock band Mike + The Mechanics. Written by guitarist Mike Rutherford and producer Christopher Neil, it was first included on their 1985 self-titled debut album, and later released as a single in early 1986 in the USA, where it reached number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was sung by Paul Young on both the original recording and the 1996 re-recording for the band's Hits compilation album.In an interview prior to the song's release as a single, Rutherford commented, "The thing that makes 'Miracle' different, to me, is that it's a happy song – or it's primarily a happy song. It's 'up'. And I don't do that very often. ...It may not be optimistic, but it's a positive attitude to life."

Billy Crystal filmography

Billy Crystal is an American actor, writer, producer, director, comedian and television host. The filmography of his work as follows.Crystal started his career in the 1970s for playing Jodie Dallas on the ABC sitcom Soap and became a Hollywood film star during the late 1980s and 1990s, appearing in the critical and box office successes When Harry Met Sally... (1989), City Slickers (1991), and Analyze This (1999) and providing the voice of Mike in the Monsters, Inc. franchise. He has hosted the Academy Awards nine times from 1990 through the 84th Academy Awards in 2012.

Brothers in Arms (song)

"Brothers in Arms" is a 1985 song by Dire Straits, appearing as the closing track on the album of the same name. It was written in 1982, the year of the Falklands War. It was re-released in 2007 as a special edition to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the conflict and raise funds for veterans of it with posttraumatic stress disorder.

Brutal (Black Uhuru album)

Brutal is a studio album by Jamaican reggae band Black Uhuru. It was released in 1986 through Real Authentic Sound, making it their first album on the label. Audio production was handled by Doctor Dread, Arthur Baker, Steven Stanley and Black Uhuru. The album peaked at number 36 in New Zealand, number 73 in the Netherlands, and was nominated for Grammy Award for Best Reggae Recording at 29th Annual Grammy Awards. The album spawned five singles: "Conviction Or Fine", "Fit You Haffe Fit", "The Great Train Robbery", "Let Us Pray" and "Dread In The Mountain". The single "Great Train Robbery" also made it to charts, reaching #31 in New Zealand, #49 in the Netherlands, #62 in the United Kingdom, and was featured in the 2004 video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas on its fictional reggae radio station K-JAH West.

Grammy Award for Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella

The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Arrangement (and its subsequent name changes) has been awarded since 1963. The award is presented to the arranger(s) of the music. Only songs or tracks are eligible, no longer works (e.g. albums). The performing artist does not receive a Grammy, except if he/she is also the arranger.

There have been several minor changes to the name of the award:

From 1963 to 1981 the award was known as Best Instrumental Arrangement

From 1982 to 1983 it was awarded as Best Arrangement on an Instrumental Recording

From 1984 to 1994 it was awarded as Best Arrangement on an Instrumental

From 1995 to 2014 it was again awarded as Best Instrumental Arrangement

From 2015 it has been awarded as Best Arrangement, Instrumental Or A Cappella, which also includes vocal arrangements for a cappella performances.Years reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year.

Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition

The Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition (including its previous names) has been awarded since 1960. The award is presented to the composer of an original piece of music (not an adaptation), first released during the eligibility year. In theory, any style of music is eligible for this category, but winning compositions are usually in the jazz or film score genres.

The Grammy is awarded to the composer(s) of the music, not to the performing artist, except if the artist is also the composer. There have been several minor changes to the name of the award:

In 1958 it was awarded as Best Musical Composition First Recorded and Released in 1958 (over 5 minutes duration)

In 1960 it was awarded as Best Musical Composition First Recorded and Released in 1959 (more than 5 minutes duration)

In 1962 it was awarded as Best Instrumental Theme or Instrumental Version of Song

From 1963 to 1964 and from 1967 to 1970 it was awarded as Best Instrumental Theme

In 1965 it was awarded as Best Instrumental Composition (other than jazz)

From 1971 to the present it has been awarded as Best Instrumental CompositionYears reflect the year in which the Grammy Awards were presented, for works released in the previous year.

Holding Back the Years

"Holding Back the Years" is the seventh track on Simply Red's debut studio album Picture Book (1985). It remains their most successful single, having reached number one on the US Billboard Hot 100 and number two on the UK Singles Chart. It is one of two Simply Red songs (the other being their cover of "If You Don't Know Me by Now") to reach number one in the US. It also reached number four on the Adult Contemporary chart. "Holding Back the Years" had initially been released in the UK the year before, reaching number 51. The song was nominated in the category of Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group With Vocals at the 29th Annual Grammy Awards.

I Remember Warsaw

I Remember Warsaw is an album by Jimmy Sturr and His Orchestra. The album won Sturr a Grammy Award for Best Polka Recording at the 29th Annual Grammy Awards (1987).

List of Grammy Award ceremony locations

The Grammy Awards have been held in many prestigious locations. In 1971 the Grammy Awards had its first live telecast and therefore had its own sole venue each year for the telecast. From 1963 to 1970 the Academy aired a TV special annually called "The Best On Record" which highlighted the awards dinners. Since 2000, the Grammy Awards have been held in the Staples Center located in Downtown Los Angeles.

Luis Cardenas

Luis Cardenas is a Latin-American drummer who has been active since the early 1980s, both as a solo act and as a member of the rock band Renegade.

No Easy Walk to Freedom

No Easy Walk to Freedom is a 1986 studio album by American folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary. Its release coincided with the group's 25th anniversary. Produced by John McClure and Peter Yarrow, the album was nominated in the Best Contemporary Folk Album category at the 29th Annual Grammy Awards.

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program

The Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program was an annual award given to performers in a variety/music series or specials. The award has been retired; it was last presented in 2008.

Renegade (band)

Renegade is an American rock n' roll band composed of Luis Cardenas, Kenny Marquez and Tony De La Rosa. Although all the band members hail from the United States, the band is widely recognized as being the first Hispanic or "Chicano rock" band to gain acceptance in the United States. Throughout Latin America, the band is known as Los Renegados.

Shades (Yellowjackets album)

Shades (1986) is the fourth studio album from the jazz group Yellowjackets. The album's first track, "And You Know That" won the "Best R&B Instrumental" Grammy Award. The album debuted on the Billboard Top Jazz Album chart on July 5, 1986 and would spend 32 weeks on the chart, eventually peaking at #4. It was the last to feature drummer Ricky Lawson.

The album features the original recording of the Yellowjackets' live staple "Revelation" (featuring vocal group Perri) as well as the Donald Fagen-penned title track.

Sweet Love (Anita Baker song)

"Sweet Love" is a song by American R&B singer and songwriter Anita Baker from her second studio album, Rapture (1986). It was written by Anita Baker, Louis A. Johnson, and Gary Bias, and produced by Michael J. Powell. It was released on May 27, 1986 as the album's second single.

The song was Baker's first big hit single, peaking at number two on the US Billboard R&B chart, number three on the US Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, and number eight on the US Billboard Hot 100 in the fall of 1986. In the UK, it reached number 13 on the UK Singles Chart and peaked at number 21 on Canada's Top Singles chart."Sweet Love" won the Grammy Award for Best R&B Song at the 29th Annual Grammy Awards (1987).

Take Me Home Tonight (song)

"Take Me Home Tonight" is a song by American rock singer Eddie Money. It was released in August 1986 as the lead single from his album Can't Hold Back. The song's chorus interpolates the Ronettes' 1963 hit "Be My Baby", with original vocalist Ronnie Spector reprising her role.

The song reached number four on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 15, 1986, and number one on the Album Rock Tracks chart; outside the U.S., it was a top 15 hit in Canada. It received a Grammy nomination for Best Male Rock Vocal Performance. Alongside its album, "Take Me Home Tonight" helped revive Money's career after a period of declining sales. It also allowed Spector to resume her touring/recording career after several years of retirement.

True Colors (Cyndi Lauper album)

True Colors is the second album by American pop singer Cyndi Lauper, released on September 15, 1986. The album produced several hits as "True Colors", "Change of Heart", and "What's Going On" reached the top twenty of the Billboard Hot 100, with the first two becoming top 5 hits.

Upon its release, the album received generally positive reviews from music critics. The album earned Lauper several awards and accolades, including two nominations at the 29th Annual Grammy Awards. True Colors peaked at number four on the Billboard 200 chart.

What Have You Done for Me Lately

"What Have You Done for Me Lately" is a song by American singer Janet Jackson from her third studio album Control (1986). Jackson co-wrote the song with its producers Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis. It was released on January 13, 1986 as the album's lead single, by A&M Records. After two unsuccessful albums and a management change, the singer began developing a new album. "What Have You Done for Me Lately" was originally penned for one of Jam and Lewis's own records, but the lyrics were rewritten to convey Jackson's feelings about her recent divorce from James DeBarge in January 1985. It revolves around a woman's frustration with her partner in a relationship.

Critical reviews for "What Have You Done for Me Lately" were positive, with music critics believing it erased the former "pop-ingénue image" of Jackson's first two albums, reestablishing her as an "independent woman" figure. The song has been featured in critic lists as one of the greatest songs of all times and received one nomination for Best Rhythm & Blues Song on the 29th annual Grammy Awards of 1987. The song peaked at number four on the US Billboard Hot 100 and was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). It also peaked at number two on the US Dance Club Songs and topped the US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs charts. Outside of the US, it topped the singles chart in the Netherlands and peaked within the top ten in Germany, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

The accompanying music video for "What Have You Done for Me Lately" was directed by Brian Jones and Piers Ashworth and choreographed by singer Paula Abdul. In it, Jackson goes to a diner with her friends to talk about her relationship problems. The video won a Soul Train Music Award for Best R&B/Soul or Rap Music Video in 1987. The song was first performed live by Jackson at the 29th annual Grammy Awards in 1987. She has also performed it live in each of her concert tours, beginning with the Rhythm Nation World Tour 1990 through the State of the World Tour (2017). It has been included in each of Jackson's greatest hits albums Design of a Decade: 1986–1996 (1995), Number Ones (2009) and Icon: Number Ones (2010). "What Have You Done for Me Lately" has been sampled and covered by various artists, and is also regarded as one of Jackson's signature songs which helped establish her as a known artist.

You Can Call Me Al

"You Can Call Me Al" is a song by the American singer-songwriter Paul Simon. It was the lead single from his seventh studio album, Graceland (1986), released on Warner Bros. Records. Written by Simon, its lyrics follow an individual seemingly experiencing a midlife crisis. Its lyrics were partially inspired by Simon's trip to South Africa and experience with its culture.

Released in September 1986, "You Can Call Me Al" became one of Simon's biggest solo hits, reaching the top five in seven countries.

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