28th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 28th Primetime Emmy Awards were handed out on May 17, 1976. The ceremony was hosted by John Denver and Mary Tyler Moore. Winners are listed in bold with series' networks in parentheses. As of 2016, this was the last Emmy Awards ceremonies held during the first half of a calendar year.

The top show of the night was Mary Tyler Moore which won its second straight Outstanding Comedy Series award, and five major awards overall. Police Story, won Outstanding Drama Series, even though it only received one major nomination.

The television miniseries Rich Man, Poor Man set numerous records. It received 17 major nominations, breaking the record held by Playhouse 90 which was set in 1959 (since broken). It also received 13 acting nominations, although some of the acting categories at this ceremony were later eliminated or combined. Despite this, it lost Outstanding Limited Series to Upstairs, Downstairs.

The Shubert Theatre had previously hosted the 1973 Emmy ceremony; it would host the ceremony a third and final time in 2001.

28th Primetime Emmy Awards
DateMay 17, 1976
LocationShubert Theatre,
Los Angeles, California
Presented byAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted byJohn Denver
Mary Tyler Moore
Television/radio coverage
NetworkABC

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series Outstanding Special - Comedy-Variety or Music
Outstanding Special - Drama or Comedy Outstanding Limited Series

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy Outstanding Lead Actress in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series

Supporting performances

Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Single performances

Outstanding Lead Actor for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series
  • Edward Asner as Axel Jordache on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Special
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Special
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Series
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Series
  • Gordon Jackson as Hudson on Upstairs, Downstairs, (Episode: "The Beastly Hun"), (PBS)
    • Bill Bixby as Willie Abbott on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
    • Roscoe Lee Browne as Charlie Jeffers on Barney Miller, (Episode: "The Escape Artist"), (ABC)
    • Norman Fell as Smitty on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
    • Van Johnson as Marsh Goodwin on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
  • Fionnula Flanagan as Clothilde on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
    • Kim Darby as Virginia Calderwood on Rich Man, Poor Man, (CBS)
    • Ruth Gordon as Carlton's Mother on Rhoda, (Episode: "Kiss Your Epaulets Goodbye"), (CBS)
    • Kay Lenz as Kate Jordache on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)

Directing

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series
  • David Greene for Rich Man, Poor Man, (Episode: "Episode 8"), (ABC)
    • Fielder Cook for Beacon Hill, (Episode: "Pilot"), (CBS)
    • Christopher Hodson for Upstairs, Downstairs, (Episode: "Women Shall Not Weep"), (PBS)
    • James Cellan Jones for Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill, (Episode: "Part IV"), (PBS)
    • Boris Sagal for Rich Man, Poor Man, (Episode: "Episode 8"), (ABC)
    • George Schaefer for Lincoln, (Episode: "Crossing Fox River"), (NBC)
Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special Outstanding Directing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy
Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series

Writing

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series
  • Sherman Yellen for The Adams Chronicles, (Episode: "John Adams, Lawyer"), (PBS)
    • Julian Mitchell, for Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill, (PBS)
    • Joel Oliansky for The Law, (Episode: "Complaint Amended"), (NBC)
    • Dean Riesner for Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
    • Alfred Shaughnessy for Upstairs, Downstairs, (Episode: "Another Year"), (PBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series
  • The Lily Tomlin Special, (ABC)
    • Gypsy in My Soul, (CBS)
    • Mitzi... Roarin' in the 20's, (CBS)
    • Van Dyke and Company, (NBC)
  • NBC's Saturday Night, (NBC)
    • The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
    • The Sonny and Cher Show, (CBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy - Original Teleplay Outstanding Writing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy - Adaptation

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
  • CBS – 57
  • ABC – 49
  • NBC – 28
  • PBS – 16
By program
  • Rich Man, Poor Man (ABC) – 17
  • Mary Tyler Moore (CBS) / M*A*S*H (CBS) – 9
  • Eleanor and Franklin (CBS) – 8
  • Upstairs, Downstairs (PBS) – 6
  • The Adams Chronicles (PBS) / Barney Miller (ABC) / Fear on Trial (CBS) / A Moon for the Misbegotten (ABC) – 5

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
  • CBS – 12
  • ABC – 10
  • NBC – 8
  • PBS – 5
By program
  • Mary Tyler Moore (CBS) – 5
  • Eleanor and Franklin (CBS) – 4
  • NBC's Saturday Night (NBC) / Rich Man, Poor Man (ABC) – 3
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

References

  1. ^ Emmys.com list of 1976 Nominees & Winners

External links

1976 Emmy Awards

1976 Emmy Awards may refer to:

28th Primetime Emmy Awards, the 1976 Emmy Awards ceremony honoring primetime programming

3rd Daytime Emmy Awards, the 1976 Emmy Awards ceremony honoring daytime programming

4th International Emmy Awards, the 1976 Emmy Awards ceremony honoring international programming

29th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 29th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 11, 1977. The ceremony was broadcast on NBC. It was hosted by Angie Dickinson and Robert Blake.

The top shows of the night were Mary Tyler Moore, which, in its final season, won its third consecutive Outstanding Comedy Series Award, it also became the first comedy series to gain eleven major nominations (since broken). Upstairs, Downstairs, also in its final season, won its third Outstanding Drama Series Award in four years (it competed as a miniseries in 1976, and won that category too). But the overwhelming champion of the ceremony was the miniseries Roots.

Roots set several milestones and broke multiple records during the night. It became the first show to receive at least twenty major nominations (21). Adding its nominations in Creative Arts categories, its total expands to 37. Both records still stand for all shows. It was the first show to gain every nomination in an acting category. Its thirteen acting nominations tied the record set the previous year by Rich Man, Poor Man, however all of Roots' nominations came in the miniseries category, while Rich Man, Poor Man had nominations cross over into the drama series field. Roots became the first miniseries, and second show overall, along with All in the Family in 1972, to win six of seven major categories. All but one of Roots' eight episodes were nominated for major awards (Part VII).

Another distinction of the night was that Mary Kay Place won a Major Acting award for a TV show (Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman) that had no major network, only broadcast in Syndication - the first time this rare feat has occurred.

With this ceremony, the Primetime Emmys began a long residency at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium that would continue until 1997.

33rd Golden Globe Awards

The 33rd Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television for 1975, were held on January 24, 1976.

34th Golden Globe Awards

The 34th Golden Globe Awards, honoring the best in film and television for 1976, were held on January 29, 1977.

48th Academy Awards

The 48th Academy Awards were presented Monday, March 29, 1976, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. The ceremonies were presided over by Walter Matthau, Robert Shaw, George Segal, Goldie Hawn and Gene Kelly. This year, ABC took over broadcast rights from NBC and continues to broadcast them today. The recent previous editions had been held on Tuesday night. (NBC's coverage of the NCAA championship basketball game aired opposite the ceremony; during the presentation of the Best Film Editing award, the winner was jokingly announced (by presenter Elliott Gould) as "Indiana, 86–68"; the undefeated Indiana Hoosiers had won the NCAA title that night in Philadelphia. The following year, the two events were again on the same night.)

Miloš Forman's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest made a "clean sweep" of the major categories: Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director and Best Screenplay (Adapted). It was the second of three films to date to accomplish the sweep, following It Happened One Night in 1934 and preceding The Silence of the Lambs in 1991.

French actress Isabelle Adjani received her first nomination for Best Actress this year, making Adjani, 20 at the time, the youngest actress to be nominated in the leading actress category, breaking the record set by 22-year-old Elizabeth Hartman in 1965. This record would later be surpassed by 13-year-old Keisha Castle-Hughes in 2004, and again in 2013 by nine-year old Quvenzhané Wallis. Adjani also presented the Best Film Editing award that night along with Gould who delivered the Indiana joke during the presentation.

At age 80, George Burns became the oldest acting and Best Supporting Actor awardee (as well as the final person to receive an acting award born in the 1800s), a record which stood until Jessica Tandy won Best Actress in 1989. For males, Burns was succeeded by Christopher Plummer, who won Best Supporting Actor in 2012 for Beginners at the age of 82.

Jaws was followed 25 years later by Traffic for a film that won all its nominations except Best Picture. As of the 91st Academy Awards, Amarcord, nominated for Best Director, is the last film to be nominated for Academy Awards in two separate years (having won the award for Best Foreign Language Film the year before).

49th Academy Awards

The 49th Academy Awards were presented Monday, March 28, 1977, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles, California. The ceremonies were presided over by Richard Pryor, Ellen Burstyn, Jane Fonda, and Warren Beatty.

This Academy Awards ceremony is notable for Peter Finch becoming the first posthumous winner of an Oscar for acting, a feat matched only by fellow Australian Heath Ledger 32 years later; Finch had suffered a fatal heart attack in mid-January. Beatrice Straight set another record by becoming the actor with the shortest performance ever in a film to win an acting Oscar, with only five minutes and two seconds of screen-time in Network. Network, along with All the President's Men, were the two biggest champs of the ceremony with four Oscars each, but Best Picture and Best Director ultimately went to Rocky.

Piper Laurie was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for Carrie (1976), her first role since her Best Actress-nominated performance in The Hustler (1961), thus being nominated for two consecutive roles, fifteen years apart.

Network became the second film (after A Streetcar Named Desire) to win three acting Oscars, and the last, as of the 90th Academy Awards, to receive five acting nominations. It was also the eleventh of fifteen films (to date) to receive nominations in all four acting categories.

This year's Academy Awards is also notable for the first ever female nominee for Best Director, Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties. Barbra Streisand received her second Academy Award, composing music for the love theme "Evergreen", the first woman to be honored as a composer, and as of the 90th Academy Awards, the only person to win Academy Awards for both acting and songwriting.

No honorary awards were given this year.

ABC had the Oscars from 1960–70 and had regained them for 1976. For the second straight year, the ceremony was scheduled directly opposite the NCAA championship basketball game on NBC, won by Marquette in Al McGuire's final game as head coach.

66th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 66th Primetime Emmy Awards honored the best in U.S. prime time television programming from June 1, 2013 until May 31, 2014, as chosen by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. The ceremony was held on Monday, August 25, 2014, at the Nokia Theatre in Downtown Los Angeles, California, and was broadcast in the U.S. by NBC. Comedian and Late Night host Seth Meyers hosted the ceremony for the first time. The nominations were announced on July 10, 2014.The scheduling of the Primetime Emmy Awards is coordinated with that of the Creative Arts Emmy Awards ceremony, which was held the previous weekend on August 16, 2014.Breaking Bad was the major winner of the night, with five wins, including its second Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series for the second part of its fifth season. Modern Family won its fifth consecutive Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series, tying with Frasier as the series with the most consecutive wins in the category. The Amazing Race won its tenth Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Reality-Competition Program as well. Other major winners of the night were Sherlock: His Last Vow (3 wins), American Horror Story: Coven and Fargo (2 wins each).

George Burditt (writer)

George Henry Burditt (July 29, 1923 – June 25, 2013) was an American television writer and producer. He wrote sketches of variety shows and other television shows, like Three's Company, which he also served as an executive producer in its last few seasons.

Griffin and Phoenix (1976 film)

Griffin and Phoenix (sometimes subtitled "A Love Story") is a 1976 American made-for-television romantic drama film produced by ABC Circle Films starring Peter Falk and Jill Clayburgh as title characters Geoffrey Griffin and Sarah Phoenix. Written by John Hill and directed by Daryl Duke, it first premiered on the ABC television network on February 27, 1976, and was also released to theaters in select countries under the title Today Is Forever from 1977 through 1980. It was nominated in the category of Outstanding Achievement in Cinematography at the 28th Primetime Emmy Awards.It tells the story of two ill-fated middle-aged characters who both face a terminal cancer diagnosis and have months left to live. A chance meeting brings them together and they fall in love, both unaware of the other's shared fate. Notably, Jill Clayburgh developed the same type of cancer her character had in this film, succumbing to it in 2010. Peter Falk died just over six months later in 2011 from complications relating to Alzheimer's disease. Griffin and Phoenix was first distributed on VHS by 20th Century Fox in 1982, but has never been formally released on DVD or Blu-ray.

John Moffitt (director)

John Moffitt is an American television director who is best known for his work on Mr. Show. Moffitt won an Emmy Award in 1977 for his work in the category of Outstanding Achievement in Coverage of Special Events - Individuals for the 28th Primetime Emmy Awards. He is a graduate of Dartmouth College.

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