28 Days Later

28 Days Later is a 2002 British post-apocalyptic horror film directed by Danny Boyle, written by Alex Garland, and starring Cillian Murphy, Naomie Harris, Brendan Gleeson, Megan Burns, and Christopher Eccleston. The plot depicts the breakdown of society following the accidental release of a highly contagious virus and focuses upon the struggle of four survivors to cope with the destruction of the life they once knew.

Successful both commercially and critically, the film is credited with reinvigorating the zombie genre of horror film.[3] The film spawned a 2007 sequel, 28 Weeks Later, a graphic novel titled 28 Days Later: The Aftermath, which expands on the timeline of the outbreak, and a 2009 comic book series titled 28 Days Later. In 2017 a poll of 150 actors, directors, writers, producers and critics for Time Out magazine ranked it the 97th best British film ever.[4]

28 Days Later
28 days later
Theatrical release poster
Directed byDanny Boyle
Produced byAndrew Macdonald
Written byAlex Garland
Music byJohn Murphy
CinematographyAnthony Dod Mantle
Edited byChris Gill
Production
company
Distributed byFox Searchlight Pictures
Release date
  • 1 November 2002 (United Kingdom)
Running time
113 minutes[1]
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Budget$8 million[1]
Box office$85 million[1][2]

Plot

In Cambridge, three animal liberation activists break into a medical research laboratory. A scientist in the lab desperately warns them against releasing the captive chimpanzees, which are infected with a highly contagious rage-inducing virus. Ignoring his pleas, the activists release a chimp, which infects a female activist. She then attacks and infects everyone else present.

28 days later, in London, Jim—a bicycle courier—awakens alone from a coma in St Thomas' Hospital. He wanders the streets of London, finding the city deserted with signs of catastrophe everywhere. Jim eventually encounters some infected humans and is pursued, but survivors Selena and Mark rescue him. At their shelter, the two explain to Jim that while he was in a coma, a virus had spread quickly among the populace, resulting in societal collapse. They claim the virus had been reported in Paris and New York City as well, suggesting the infection has spread worldwide.

The next day, Selena and Mark accompany Jim to his parents' house in Deptford, where he discovers they had committed suicide. That night, the three fend off a pair of infected; Mark is bitten, and Selena kills him. She explains to Jim that the virus spreads through blood and saliva and overwhelms its victims in 10 to 20 seconds. After leaving the house, the two see some blinking Christmas lights from Balfron Tower. There, they discover two more survivors: cab driver Frank and his daughter Hannah, who allow them to take shelter. The next day, Frank informs them that their supplies (particularly water) are dwindling; he plays them a pre-recorded radio broadcast from a military blockade near Manchester, claiming to have "the answer to infection" and promising protection to any survivors that can reach them.

The group board Frank's cab and head to Manchester, bonding with one another during the trip. At the deserted blockade, Frank is infected when a drop of blood falls into his eye. He is killed by arriving soldiers, who take the remaining survivors to a fortified mansion under the command of Major Henry West. West reveals to Jim that his "answer to infection" entails waiting for the infected to starve to death and luring female survivors into sexual slavery to repopulate the world. The group attempts to flee, but Jim is captured and chained next to Sergeant Farrell, a dissenting soldier. Farrell shares with Jim his speculation that the virus has not spread beyond Great Britain and that the country is being quarantined.

The next day, the soldiers prepare the girls for gang rape, while two others lead Jim and Farrell to execution. While his executioners argue after killing Farrell, Jim escapes, and witnesses a plane flying high overhead, seemingly confirming Farrell's theory. Jim lures West and another soldier to the blockade, where Jim kills the latter and leaves West stranded for arriving infected. He runs back to the mansion and releases Mailer, an infected soldier West kept for observation. Mailer infects another soldier and they wreak murderous havoc throughout the mansion. In the confusion, a soldier drags Selena upstairs, where Jim ambushes and kills him. The two reunite with Hannah and run to Frank's cab; Jim is then shot by West, who has been waiting inside. Mailer grabs West through the rear window of the cab and kills him, and the trio finally leave the mansion.

Another 28 days later, Jim is recovering at a remote cottage. Downstairs, he finds Selena sewing large swaths of fabric when Hannah appears, announcing she has heard something. The three rush outside and unfurl a huge cloth banner, adding the final letter to the word "HELLO" laid out on the meadow. As some infected are shown dying of starvation, a lone Finnish fighter jet flies over the three survivors; Selena wonders aloud if it had seen them.

Alternative endings

The DVD extras include three alternative endings, all of which conclude with Jim dying. Two were filmed, while the third, a more radical departure, was presented only in storyboards. On 25 July 2003, cinemas started showing the alternative ending after the film's credits.[5]

Jim dies at the hospital

In this ending, after Jim is shot, Selena and Hannah still rush him to the deserted hospital, but the scene is extended. Selena, with Hannah's assistance, attempts to perform life-saving procedures but cannot revive Jim. Selena is heartbroken and Hannah, distraught, looks to her for guidance. Selena tells Hannah they will go on; they pick up their guns and walk away from Jim's lifeless body. Selena and Hannah, still dressed in ballgowns and fully armed, leave the hospital.

On the DVD commentary, Boyle and Garland explain that this was the original ending of the film's first cut, which was tested with preview audiences. It was rejected for seeming too bleak; the final exit from the hospital was intended to imply Selena and Hannah's survival, whereas test audiences felt the women were marching off to certain death. Boyle and Garland express a preference for this alternative ending, calling it the "true ending". They comment that this ending brought Jim full circle, as he starts and finishes the story in bed in a deserted hospital. This ending was added in the theatrical release of the film beginning on 25 July 2003, placed after the credits and prefaced with the words, "what if..."[5]

"Hospital Dream"

The "Hospital Dream" ending is an extended version of the theatrical alternative ending, wherein Jim dies at the hospital. In the optional commentary the director states that this was the full version of the original ending. Jim dreams while unconscious and remembers the final moments on his bicycle before the crash. The footage cuts back and forth between the scene with Selena and Hannah trying to save his life, and the dream sequence. As he gets hit by a car in his flashback, he simultaneously dies on the operating table.

Rescue coda without Jim

This ending, for which only a rough edit was completed, is an alternative version of the potential rescue sequence shown at the very end of the released film. Here, the scenes are identical, except that this ending was intended to be placed after the first alternative ending wherein Jim dies, so he is absent. When Selena is sewing one of the banner letters in the cottage, she is seen facetiously talking to a chicken instead of Jim. Only Selena and Hannah are seen waving to the jet flying overhead in the final shots.

"Radical Alternative Ending"

The "Radical Alternative Ending", rather than a bare ending, is a radically different development of the film from the midpoint; it was not filmed and is presented on the DVD as a series of illustrated storyboards with voiceovers by Boyle and Garland. When Frank is infected at the military blockade near Manchester, the soldiers do not enter the story. Instead, Jim, Selena, and Hannah are somehow able to restrain Frank, hoping they will find a cure for the virus nearby as suggested in the radio broadcast. They soon discover that the blockade had protected a large medical research complex, the same one featured in the first scene of the film where the virus was developed. Inside, the party is relieved to find a scientist barricaded inside a room with food and water. He will not open the door because he fears they will take his food, although he does admit that the "answer to infection is here". Unfortunately, he refuses to talk further because he does not want to create an emotional attachment to people who will soon be dead. After hours of failed attempts to break through the door or coax the man out, Jim eventually brings Hannah to the door and explains Frank's situation.

The scientist reluctantly tells them Frank can only be cured with a complete blood transfusion and supplies them with the equipment. After learning that he is the only match with Frank's blood type, Jim sacrifices himself so Frank can survive with his daughter. Just as his journey began, Jim is left alone in the abandoned medical facility, and Selena, Hannah and Frank move into the room with the scientist, as a horde of the infected breaches the complex. The computer monitors show death and destruction come to life around a thrashing, infected Jim, who is strapped to the same table as the chimp had been in the opening scene. Garland and Boyle explain that they conceived this ending to see what the film would be like if they did not expand the focus beyond the four survivors. They decided against it because the idea of a total blood replacement as a cure was not credible. Boyle said in the DVD commentary that it "didn't make much sense", since the film had already established that one drop of blood can infect a person. "What would we do? Drain him of blood and scrub his veins with bleach?"

Cast

On the DVD commentary, Boyle explains that, with the aim of preserving the suspension of disbelief, relatively unknown actors were cast in the film. Cillian Murphy had starred primarily in small independent films, while Naomie Harris had acted on British television as a child, and Megan Burns had only one previous film credit. However, Christopher Eccleston and Brendan Gleeson were well-known character actors.

Production

After director Danny Boyle and producer Andrew Macdonald filmed an adaptation of Alex Garland's novel The Beach, Garland approached Macdonald about his concept for 28 Days Later. In an interview with Creative Screenwriting, Garland explained, "I said to him that I had an idea for a movie about running zombies. I wrote it and sent it to him and the two of us went backwards and forwards with it for a few drafts... At the point I was working on 28 Days Later I had a lot of zombie movies as well as video games like Resident Evil turning round in my head."[6]

28 Days Later features scenes set in normally bustling parts of London such as Westminster Bridge, Piccadilly Circus, Horse Guards Parade and Oxford Street. To depict these locations as desolate, the film crew closed off sections of street for minutes at a time, usually in early morning before sunrise on Sundays and would have typically around 45 minutes after dawn, to shoot the locations devoid of traffic and members of the public – to minimise disruption. To minimize disruptions during filming, attractive women, including Danny Boyle’s daughter, were also hired in order to request early morning drivers and clubbers to find another route to avoid the set.[7] Portions of the film were shot on a Canon XL1 digital video camera.[8] DV cameras are much smaller and more manoeuvrable than traditional film cameras, which would have been impractical on such brief shoots. The scenes of the M1 motorway devoid of traffic were also filmed within very limited time periods. A mobile police roadblock slowed traffic sufficiently, to leave a long section of carriageway empty while the scene was filmed. The section depicted in the film was filmed at Milton Keynes, nowhere near Manchester. For the London scene where Jim walks by the overturned double-decker bus, the film crew placed the bus on its side and removed it when the shot was finished, all within 20 minutes. Much of the filming took place prior to the 11 September attacks and in the audio commentary, Boyle notes the parallel between the "missing persons" flyers seen at the beginning of the film and similar flyers posted in New York City in the wake of the attacks. Boyle adds that his crew probably would not have been granted permission to close off Whitehall for filming after the terrorist attacks in New York. A clapperboard seen in one of the DVD extra features shows filming was still taking place on 8 October 2001.

The mansion used in the film was Trafalgar Park near Salisbury. Many rooms in the house, including the Cipriani-painted music room and the main hall, were filmed with minimal set decoration. The scenes occurring upstairs were filmed downstairs, as the mansion's owner resided upstairs. The old ruins used as the setting for an idyllic interlude in their journey to Manchester, were those of Waverley Abbey, Surrey. The end scenes of the film where Jim, Selena and Hannah are living in a rural cottage were filmed around Ennerdale in Cumbria.[9] This reflects the motorway road signage in the film which indicates the trio heading north towards the Lake District National Park.

On the DVD commentary, Boyle and Garland frequently call it a post apocalypse and horror film, commenting on scenes that were quotation of George A. Romero's Dead trilogy. During the initial marketing of the film Boyle did try to distance the film from such labels. Boyle identified John Wyndham's The Day of the Triffids as Garland's original inspiration for the story.[10]

Reception

28 Days Later was a considerable success at the box office and became highly profitable on a budget of about £5 million. In the UK, it took in £6.1 million, while in the US it became a surprise hit, taking over $45 million despite a limited release at fewer than 1,500 screens across the country. The film garnered around $84.7 million worldwide.

Critical views of the film were very positive. Based on 220 reviews collected by the film review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, 87% of critics gave 28 Days Later a positive review with an average score of 7.4/10 and the site's consensus reads: "Kinetically directed by Danny Boyle, 28 Days Later is both a terrifying zombie movie and a sharp political allegory."[11] On Metacritic, the film received a rating of 73 (out of 100) based on 39 reviews.[12]

Bravo awarded it the 100th spot on their list of The 100 Scariest Movie Moments with the commentators explaining that making the zombies move fast for the first time was a bright and effective idea.[13] In 2007, Stylus Magazine named it the second best zombie movie of all time.[14] The film also ranked at number 456 in Empire's 2008 list of the 500 greatest movies of all time.[15] Bloody Disgusting ranked the film seventh in their list of the Top 20 Horror Films of the Decade, with the article saying "Zombie movie? Political allegory? Humanist drama? 28 Days Later is all of those things and more – a genuine work of art by a director at the top of his game. What's so amazing about the film is the way it so expertly balances scenes of white-knuckled, hell-for-leather horror with moments of intimate beauty."[3]

Accolades

  • Best Horror Film (2003 U.S. Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films — Saturn Award)[16]
  • Best British Film (Empire Award)[17]
  • Danny Boyle (Grand Prize of European Fantasy Film in Silver)[18]
  • Best Director — Danny Boyle (International Fantasy Film Award)[19]
  • Best International Film — Danny Boyle (Narcisse Award)[18]
  • Best Breakthrough Performance — Naomie Harris (Black Reel)[18]
  • Best Cinematographer — Anthony Dod Mantle (European Film Award)[18]

Music

The film's score was composed by John Murphy and was released in a score/song compilation in 2003. It also features notable tracks from Brian Eno, Grandaddy, and Blue States.

A heavily edited version of the track "East Hastings" by the post-rock band Godspeed You! Black Emperor appears in the film, but the track is excluded from the soundtrack, because Boyle could only obtain the rights to use it in the film.[20]

28 Days Later: The Soundtrack Album was released on 17 June 2003. A modified version of the soundtrack "In The House – In A Heartbeat" was used as the character Big Daddy's theme in the 2010 film Kick-Ass. The same song was played in the 2012 advertisement campaign of Louis Vuitton, L'Invitation au Voyage.[21]

Legacy

Sequels

A sequel, 28 Weeks Later, was released on 11 May 2007.[22] Danny Boyle and Alex Garland took producing roles alongside Andrew Macdonald. The plot revolves around the arrival of American troops about seven months after the incidents in the original film, attempting to revitalise a nearly desolate Britain. The cast for this sequel includes Robert Carlyle, Rose Byrne, Jeremy Renner, Imogen Poots, Harold Perrineau, Catherine McCormack, Mackintosh Muggleton, and Idris Elba.

In March 2007, Danny Boyle claimed to be interested in making a third film in the series, 28 Months Later.[23]

Comic books

Fox Atomic Comics, in association with HarperCollins, released a graphic novel bridging the time gap between 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later, titled 28 Days Later: The Aftermath, written by Steve Niles.

28 Days Later, a comic sequel also linking Days and Weeks and produced by Fox Atomic (until its demise) and Boom! Studios, began production in 2009. The series focuses on Selena and answers questions about her in the film and her sequel whereabouts.[24]

References

  1. ^ a b c "28 Days Later". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 3 February 2015.
  2. ^ "28 Days Later (Secret Cinema)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  3. ^ a b "00's Retrospect: Bloody Disgusting's Top 20 Films of the Decade... Part 3". Bloody Disgusting. Archived from the original on 24 December 2009. Retrieved 3 January 2010.
  4. ^ "The 100 best British films". Time Out. Retrieved 24 October 2017
  5. ^ a b "Plotting alternative film endings". BBC. 15 August 2003. Retrieved 2 February 2008.
  6. ^ McKittrick, Christopher (6 January 2016). "Alex Garland on Screenwriting". Creative Screenwriting. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  7. ^ "IMDB 28 Days Later Trivia". IMDB. Retrieved 15 February 2019.
  8. ^ Bankston, Douglas (1 July 2003). "Anthony Dod Mantle, DFF injects the apocalyptic 28 Days Later with a strain of digital video". TheASC.com. Retrieved 1 May 2007.
  9. ^ "Cumbria live". BBC. Retrieved 30 September 2010.
  10. ^ Kermode, Mark (6 May 2007). "A capital place for panic attacks". Guardian News and Media Limited. London. Archived from the original on 13 May 2007. Retrieved 12 May 2007.
  11. ^ "28 Days Later". Rotten Tomatoes. Flixter. Retrieved 5 July 2012.
  12. ^ "28 Days Later". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 6 June 2010.
  13. ^ "The 100 Scariest Movie Moments". BravoTV.com. Archived from the original on 30 October 2007. Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  14. ^ "Stylus Magazine's Top 10 Zombie Films of All Time". StylusMagazine.com. Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  15. ^ "Empire's 500 Greatest Movies of All Times". Empireonline.com. Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  16. ^ "Past Saturn Award Recipients".
  17. ^ "The Empire Awards 2003".
  18. ^ a b c d 28 Days Later..., retrieved 2018-02-24
  19. ^ "Fantasporto".
  20. ^ Kitty Empire (10 November 2002). "Godspeed You! Black Emperor: Adjusting to Fame After '28 Days Later'". Guardian News and Media Limited. London. Archived from the original on 9 December 2006. Retrieved 26 November 2006.
  21. ^ Kilic, Uygar. "Louis Vuitton L'Invitation au Voyage Advertisement Campaign: Video and Collection". Cars & Life. Retrieved 28 November 2012.
  22. ^ Gingold, Michael (14 July 2006). "July 14: Fox sets HILLS II and more release dates". Fangoria. Archived from the original on 31 August 2006. Retrieved 1 September 2006.
  23. ^ "28 Months Later?". Moviehole.net. Archived from the original on 12 October 2007. Retrieved 18 July 2012.
  24. ^ "BOOM!, Fox Announce "28 Days Later" Comic Book Series". ComicBookResources.com. Retrieved 18 July 2012.

External links

28 Days Later (comics)

28 Days Later is a comic book series published by BOOM! Studios, written by Michael Alan Nelson and drawn by Declan Shalvey and Alejandro Aragon.

The series follows on from the events of 28 Days Later, initially taking place in the gap between it and the sequel, 28 Weeks Later, much like the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath, and as such references the upcoming American-led NATO occupation. Issues 22, 23 and 24 directly reference events from the second movie, and takes place in the same time frame, ending with the Rage Virus spreading into mainland Europe.

28 Weeks Later

28 Weeks Later is a 2007 horror film directed by Juan Carlos Fresnadillo, a sequel to the 2002 film 28 Days Later. The film stars Robert Carlyle, Rose Byrne, Jeremy Renner, Harold Perrineau, Catherine McCormack, Imogen Poots, and Idris Elba. Its plot is set after the events of the first film, depicting the efforts of NATO military forces to salvage a safe zone in London, the consequence of two young siblings breaking protocol to find their infected mother, and the resulting reintroduction of the Rage Virus to the safe zone. The film was released in the United Kingdom and United States on 11 May 2007.

30th Saturn Awards

The 30th Saturn Awards, honoring the best in science fiction, fantasy and horror film and television in 2003, were held on May 5, 2004 at the Universal Sheraton Hotel in Los Angeles, California.

The five Best Film categories were respectively won by X2 (Science Fiction), The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (Fantasy), 28 Days Later (Horror), Kill Bill: Volume 1 (Action, Adventure or Thriller), and Finding Nemo (Animation). The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King received the most nominations with thirteen (including two Best Actor nominations and three Best Supporting Actor nominations), and the most wins with eight.

The ceremony marked the only time a person received one single nomination for two different works: James Marsters won the award for Best Supporting Actor on Television for his work on the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and its spin-off series Angel; he portrayed the same character, Spike, in both. Ellen DeGeneres also became the first actress to win an award for voice acting, and the third person to do so after Robin Williams and Scott Weinger in 1992, both for Aladdin.

8th Empire Awards

The 8th Empire Awards ceremony (officially known as the Sony Ericsson Empire Awards), presented by the British film magazine Empire, honored the best films of 2002 and took place on 5 February 2003 at The Dorchester Hotel in London, England. During the ceremony, Empire presented Empire Awards in nine categories as well as two honorary awards. The award for Sony Ericsson Scene of the Year was first introduced this year. The Best Debut award was renamed to "Best Newcomer". British actor Richard E. Grant hosted the show for the first time. The awards were sponsored by Sony Ericsson for the first time.Minority Report won the most awards with three including Best Director for Steven Spielberg. Other winners included 28 Days Later, About a Boy, Die Another Day, Spider-Man, Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones and The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers with one. Dustin Hoffman received the Lifetime Achievement Award and Michael Winterbottom and Andrew Eaton received the Independent Spirit Award for their role in the direction and production of 24 Hour Party People.

Alex Garland

Alexander Medawar Garland (born 26 May 1970) is an English novelist, screenwriter, film producer, and director. He rose to prominence as a novelist in the late 1990s with his novel The Beach, which led some critics to call Garland a key voice of Generation X. He subsequently received praise for the screenplays of the films 28 Days Later (2002), Sunshine (2007), Never Let Me Go (2010), and Dredd (2012).

In 2014, Garland made his directorial debut with Ex Machina, a science fiction thriller which explores the relationship between mankind and artificial intelligence; the film earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay. He also won three BIFA awards for Best Screenplay, Best Director and Best British Independent Film. His second film, 2018's Annihilation, based on the 2014 novel by Jeff VanderMeer, was a critical success, but was considered a box office failure.

Andrew Macdonald (producer)

Andrew Macdonald (born 1966) is a Scottish film producer, best known for his collaborations with screenwriter John Hodge and director Danny Boyle, including Shallow Grave (1994), Trainspotting (1996), The Beach (2000) and 28 Days Later (2002).

Brendan Gleeson

Brendan Gleeson (born 29 March 1955) is an Irish actor and film director. He is the recipient of three IFTA Awards, two BIFA Awards, and an Emmy Award and has been nominated twice for a BAFTA Award and thrice for a Golden Globe Award.

His best-known performances include supporting roles in Braveheart (1995), Mission: Impossible 2 (2000), Gangs of New York (2002), 28 Days Later (2002), Troy (2004), as Alastor Moody in the Harry Potter films (2005–10), Edge of Tomorrow (2014), and Paddington 2, and leading roles in films such as In Bruges (2008), The Guard (2011), Calvary (2014), and Live by Night (2016). He won an Emmy Award in 2009 for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in the television film Into the Storm.

He is also the father of actors Domhnall Gleeson, Brian Gleeson.

Cillian Murphy

Cillian Murphy (; born 25 May 1976) is an Irish actor. He began his career performing as a rock musician. After turning down a record deal, he began his acting career in theatre, and in short and independent films in the late 1990s.

He appeared in the films 28 Days Later (2002), Cold Mountain (2003), Intermission (2003), Red Eye (2005) and Breakfast on Pluto (also 2005), for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe award for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy and won an Irish Film and Television Award for Best Actor.

He played the character of Dr. Jonathan Crane (Scarecrow) in the highly successful films of The Dark Knight Trilogy (2005–2012). He starred in The Wind That Shakes the Barley (2006), Sunshine (2007), The Edge of Love (2008), Inception (2010) and Peacock (also 2010).

In 2011, Murphy won the Irish Times Theatre Award for Best Actor and the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Solo Performance for Misterman. He also became patron of the UNESCO Child and Family Research Centre at the National University of Ireland Galway. He is closely associated with the work of Professor Pat Dolan, Director UCFRC and UNESCO Chair in Children, Youth and Civic Engagement. He was also in the films In Time (2011), Retreat (2011) and Red Lights (2012).

Since 2013, Murphy has portrayed Thomas Shelby, the lead of the BBC gangster series Peaky Blinders, for which he has won two Best Actor - Drama Irish Film and Television Awards in 2017 and 2018 respectively. He was in the films Transcendence (2014), In the Heart of the Sea (2015), Anthropoid (2016) and Dunkirk (2017).

Danny Boyle

Daniel Francis Boyle (born 20 October 1956) is an English film director, producer, screenwriter and theatre director, known for his work on films including Shallow Grave, Trainspotting with its 2017 sequel, The Beach, 28 Days Later, Sunshine, Slumdog Millionaire, 127 Hours, and Steve Jobs. His debut film Shallow Grave won the BAFTA Award for Best British Film. The British Film Institute ranked Trainspotting the 10th greatest British film of the 20th century.

Boyle's 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire, the most successful British film of the decade, was nominated for ten Academy Awards and won eight, including the Academy Award for Best Director. He also won the Golden Globe and BAFTA Award for Best Director. Boyle was presented with the Extraordinary Contribution to Filmmaking Award at the 2008 Austin Film Festival, where he also introduced that year's AFF Audience Award Winner Slumdog Millionaire.

In 2012, Boyle was the artistic director for Isles of Wonder, the opening ceremony of the 2012 Summer Olympics. He was subsequently offered a knighthood as part of the New Year Honours, but declined. In 2014, it was announced that Boyle would become a patron of HOME in Manchester.

East Hastings (song)

"East Hastings" is a 1997 song by the Canadian rock band Godspeed You! Black Emperor from the album F♯ A♯ ∞ and is perhaps best known for its use in the film 28 Days Later in an edited version.The song is named after East Hastings Street in Vancouver's blighted Downtown Eastside.During an interview with The Guardian, 28 Days Later director Danny Boyle explained, "I always try to have a soundtrack in my mind [when creating a film]. Like when we did Trainspotting, it was Underworld. For me, the soundtrack to 28 Days Later was Godspeed. The whole film was cut to Godspeed in my head."The song does not appear on 28 Days Later: The Soundtrack Album because the rights to the song could not be obtained.

Godspeed You! Black Emperor

Godspeed You! Black Emperor is a Canadian experimental music collective which originated in Montreal, Quebec in 1994. The group releases recordings through Constellation, an independent record label also located in Montreal. After the release of their debut album in 1997, the group toured regularly from 1998 to 2002. In 2003, the band announced an indefinite hiatus in order for members to pursue other musical interests. In the intervening period, the group was occasionally rumored to have broken up, but finally reconvened for a tour which began in late 2010. Since reforming, they have released three more albums, the most recent being Luciferian Towers in September 2017.

The band has gained a dedicated cult following and remains very influential in the post-rock genre. In September 2013, Allelujah! Don't Bend! Ascend! won the 2013 Polaris Music Prize.

The band is also known for their song "East Hastings" from the 1997 album F♯ A♯ ∞, which was used in the film 28 Days Later in an edited version. "East Hastings" does not appear on the 28 Days Later: The Soundtrack Album because the rights to the song could not be obtained.

John Murphy (composer)

John Murphy (born 4 March 1965) is a British film composer. He is a self-taught multi-instrumental musician who began his career in the 1980s, working notably with The Lotus Eaters, Thomas Lang, Gary Wall and Claudia Brücken. Since the beginning of his career, he has collaborated numerous times with several directors, mainly Vadim Jean and Danny Boyle. He has received praise through the years and some of his awards include the Silver Award (1st Prize) at the Cannes Film Festival, a British D&AD Award, and a BMI Award.

Murphy gained recognition in the film industry while working with Guy Ritchie on his film Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Michael Mann's Miami Vice, Matthew Vaughn's Kick-Ass and scoring various films by Danny Boyle. His instrumental tracks "In the House – In a Heartbeat" from 28 Days Later and "Adagio in D Minor" from Sunshine have been featured in a variety of TV shows, commercials and film trailers.

Juan Carlos Fresnadillo

Juan Carlos Fresnadillo (born 5 December 1967) is a Spanish film director, script writer, and producer. He directed Intacto and 28 Weeks Later, the sequel to Danny Boyle's 28 Days Later. His film Esposados was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film in 1996.

List of 28 Days Later characters

Characters from the 28 Days Later series (the films 28 Days Later and 28 Weeks Later and from the graphic novel 28 Days Later: The Aftermath) are listed below.

Modern Warfare (Community)

"Modern Warfare" is the 23rd episode of the first season of Community and originally premiered on May 6, 2010 on NBC. In the episode, after the Dean announces the prize for a friendly game of paintball, Greendale sinks into a state of all-out paintball war, with every student battling for supremacy. During the chaos, Jeff's study group teams up in order to last longer in the game. Meanwhile, Jeff and Britta confront their unresolved sexual tension.

The episode was written by Emily Cutler and directed by Justin Lin. The episode's plot is a pastiche of multiple action movies, such as Battle Royale, Pitch Black, The Matrix, Die Hard, Terminator, 28 Days Later, The Warriors, Rambo, Predator, and the films of John Carpenter and John Woo. The episode received overwhelmingly positive reviews from critics and came third in its timeslot. Three sequels to this episode, "A Fistful of Paintballs", "For a Few Paintballs More", and "Modern Espionage" followed this episode.

Naomie Harris

Naomie Melanie Harris (born 6 September 1976) is an English actress. She started her career as a child actress, appearing in the television series Simon and the Witch in 1987. She portrayed the voodoo witch Tia Dalma in the second and third Pirates of the Caribbean films, Selena in 28 Days Later, and Winnie Mandela in Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom. She garnered attention for her performance as Eve Moneypenny in the James Bond films Skyfall and Spectre.

In 2016, she starred in the critically acclaimed film Moonlight, a performance which earned her several accolades, including Golden Globe, BAFTA, and Academy Award nominations for Best Supporting Actress. Harris was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2017 New Year Honours for services to drama.

Paul Kasey

Paul Kasey (born 5 August 1973) is an English actor who frequently plays monsters on Doctor Who, The Sarah Jane Adventures and Torchwood.

Kasey was born in Chatham, Kent. He has played the Cybercontroller, the Cyber Leader, Cybermen, a clockwork android, the Hoix, an Auton, a Slitheen, an Ood, the Anne-Droid and a member of the Forest of Cheem in Doctor Who, and Janet the Weevil, Alien Blowfish and a Hoix in Torchwood.

He has also made many appearances in The Sarah Jane Adventures as aliens, and frequent appearances as himself on Totally Doctor Who, usually in costume.

Kasey has also appeared as a zombie in 28 Days Later and has appeared in the Star Wars film series as Ello Asty in The Force Awakens, Admiral Raddus in Rogue One, and C'ai Threnalli in The Last Jedi.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.