24th Academy Awards

The 24th Academy Awards honored the best in film in 1951, as recognized by the American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Best Picture was awarded to An American in Paris, which, like A Place in the Sun, received six Academy Awards. A Streetcar Named Desire won four Oscars, including three of the acting awards. The film's only unsuccessful acting nomination was that of Marlon Brando, whose performance as Stanley Kowalski was later considered one of the most influential of modern film acting.[1]

Humphrey Bogart was the last man born in the 19th century to win a leading role Oscar.

An American in Paris became the second color film to win Best Picture, after 1939's Gone with the Wind.

24th Academy Awards
DateMarch 20, 1952
SiteRKO Pantages Theatre, Hollywood, California
Hosted byDanny Kaye
Highlights
Best PictureAn American in Paris
Most awardsAn American in Paris and A Place in the Sun (6)
Most nominationsA Streetcar Named Desire (12)

Awards

Nominations were announced on February 11, 1952. Winners are listed first and highlighted in boldface.[2]

Best Motion Picture Best Director
Best Actor Best Actress
Best Supporting Actor Best Supporting Actress
Best Story and Screenplay Best Screenplay
Best Story Best Short Subject – Cartoons
Best Documentary Feature Best Documentary Short Subject
Best Live Action Short Subject, One-Reel Best Live Action Short Subject, Two-Reel
Best Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture Best Scoring of a Musical Picture
Best Song Best Sound Recording
Best Art Direction, Black-and-White Best Art Direction, Color
Best Cinematography, Black-and-White Best Cinematography, Color
Best Costume Design, Black-and-White Best Costume Design, Color
Best Film Editing

Academy Honorary Award

Best Foreign Language Film

Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award

Presenters

Performers

Multiple nominations and awards

These films had multiple nominations:

The following films received multiple awards.

See also

References

  1. ^ Roger Ebert. "Review: 'A Streetcar Named Desire'". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on 2005-04-13. Retrieved 2004-07-02.
  2. ^ "The 24th Academy Awards (1952) Nominees and Winners". Oscars.org (Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences). Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-08-19.
1951 Academy Awards

1951 Academy Awards may refer to:

23rd Academy Awards, the Academy Awards ceremony that took place in 1951

24th Academy Awards, the 1952 ceremony honoring the best in film for 1951

1952 Academy Awards

1952 Academy Awards may refer to:

24th Academy Awards, the Academy Awards ceremony that took place in 1952

25th Academy Awards, the 1953 ceremony honoring the best in film for 1952

1952 in Norway

Events in the year 1952 in Norway.

1952 in animation

Events in 1952 in animation.

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951 film)

A Streetcar Named Desire is a 1951 American drama film, adapted from Tennessee Williams's Pulitzer Prize-winning 1947 play of the same name. It tells the story of a southern belle, Blanche DuBois, who, after encountering a series of personal losses, leaves her aristocratic background seeking refuge with her sister and brother-in-law in a dilapidated New Orleans tenement. The Broadway production and cast was converted to film with several changes.

Tennessee Williams collaborated with Oscar Saul and Elia Kazan on the screenplay. Kazan, who directed the Broadway stage production, also directed the black and white film. Marlon Brando, Kim Hunter, and Karl Malden were all cast in their original Broadway roles. Although Jessica Tandy originated the role of Blanche DuBois on Broadway, Vivien Leigh, who had appeared in the London theatre production, was cast in the film adaptation for her star power.Upon release of the film, Marlon Brando, virtually unknown at the time of the play's casting, rose to prominence as a major Hollywood film star, and received the first of four consecutive Academy Award nominations for Best Actor. The film earned an estimated $4,250,000 at the US and Canadian box office in 1951, making it the fifth biggest hit of the year. In 1999, A Streetcar Named Desire was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

Academy Award for Best Story

The Academy Award for Best Story was an Academy Award given from the beginning of the Academy Awards until 1956.

See also the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay and Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay.

Cinema of Norway

Norway has had a notable cinema industry for some time.

The first film produced domestically in Norway was a short about fishermen, Fiskerlivets farer, dating from 1907. The first feature was released in 1911, produced by Halfman Nobel Roede. In 1931 Tancred Ibsen, grandson of the playwright, presented Norway's first feature-length sound film, Den store barnedåpen ("The Great Christening"). Through the 1930s Ibsen "dominated" the nation's film industry, with Leif Sinding in second place. Ibsen produced conventional melodramas more or less on the model of Hollywood films.

In the early 21st century a few Norwegian film directors have had the opportunity to go to Hollywood to direct various independent films. As of 2011, nearly 900 films had been produced in Norway, with a third of these being made in the last 15 years.

Edward Stevenson (costume designer)

Edward Manson Stevenson (May 13, 1906 – December 2, 1968) was an Academy Award-winning American costume designer. His film and television credits number well over two hundred, including Citizen Kane (1941) and It's a Wonderful Life (1946), both frequently cited as being among the greatest films of all time. In his later years, he worked for Lucille Ball as costume designer for I Love Lucy, The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show, and Here’s Lucy. A large collection of his costume sketches are housed in the Department of Special collections at Eli M. Oboler Library in Pocatello, Idaho.

Gordon E. Sawyer

Gordon E. Sawyer (27 August 1905 – 15 May 1980) was sound director at Samuel Goldwyn Productions. He won 3 Oscars for Best Sound and was nominated a further 13 times.

I Want You (1951 film)

I Want You is a 1951 film directed by Mark Robson taking place in America during the Korean War. The film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Sound (Gordon E. Sawyer).

Kon-Tiki (1950 film)

Kon-Tiki is a Norwegian-Swedish documentary film about the Kon-Tiki expedition led by Norwegian explorer and writer Thor Heyerdahl in 1947, released in Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Denmark in 1950, followed by the United States in 1951. The movie, which was directed by Thor Heyerdahl and edited by Olle Nordemar, received the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature for 1951 at the 24th Academy Awards. The Oscar officially went to Olle Nordemar.

The Academy Film Archive preserved Kon-Tiki in 2013.

Leslie I. Carey

Sound recordist Leslie I. Carey (August 3, 1895 – June 17, 1984) first hit Hollywood in 1938, where he embarked on the first of over 300 films. Some of these were A Double Life in 1947, The Naked City and Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein in 1948, Winchester '73 in 1950, Creature from the Black Lagoon and Magnificent Obsession in 1954, Man Without a Star and This Island Earth in 1955, The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957) and Operation Petticoat (1959). Also in the late 1950s, he worked extensively on the "Peter Gunn" TV series. Nominated six times for the Academy Awards, he won an Oscar in 1954 for The Glenn Miller Story.

List of submissions to the 44th Academy Awards for Best Foreign Language Film

The following 20 films, all from different countries, were submitted for the 44th Academy Awards in the category Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. The highlighted titles were the five nominated films, which came from Israel, Italy, Japan, Sweden and the USSR. The Oscar went to The Garden of the Finzi-Continis, a drama about an aristocratic Jewish family in Italy. France, which received 27 nominations between 1957 and 1991, failed to receive an Oscar nomination for only the fourth time since the inauguration of the Foreign Language Film award.

Japanese film director Akira Kurosawa gained his first nomination for the award (although he had received an honorary award at the 24th Academy Awards in 1951 for Rashomon) for Dodes'ka-den, a film which was a critical and commercial failure in his native Japan.

Bulgaria and Canada submitted films for consideration for the first time.

Nature's Half Acre

Nature's Half Acre is a 1951 American short documentary film directed by James Algar. In 1952, it won an Oscar at the 24th Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Two-Reel). The film was produced by Walt Disney as part of the True-Life Adventures series of nature documentaries.

Olle Nordemar

Olof Harry "Olle" Nordemar (25 July 1914 – 18 February 1999) was a Swedish film director, film editor, film producer, cinematographer and screenwriter. Nordemar is best known as the producer behind Olle Hellbom's films based on novels by Astrid Lindgren. Nordemar edited and produced the Norwegian-Swedish documentary Kon-Tiki (1950) which received the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature for 1951 at the 24th Academy Awards.

Rashomon

Rashomon (羅生門, Rashōmon) is a 1950 Japanese period psychological thriller film directed by Akira Kurosawa, working in close collaboration with cinematographer Kazuo Miyagawa. It stars Toshiro Mifune, Machiko Kyō, Masayuki Mori, and Takashi Shimura. While the film borrows the title from Ryūnosuke Akutagawa's short story "Rashōmon", it is actually based on Akutagawa's short story of 1922 "In a Grove", which provides the characters and plot.

The film is known for a plot device that involves various characters providing subjective, alternative, self-serving and contradictory versions of the same incident. Rashomon marked the entrance of Japanese film onto the world stage; it won several awards, including the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1951, and an Academy Honorary Award at the 24th Academy Awards in 1952, and is considered one of the greatest films ever made. The Rashomon effect is named after the film.

Seven Days to Noon

Seven Days to Noon is a 1950 British drama/thriller film directed by John and Roy Boulting. Based on the book, Un Nazi en Manhattan, written by Fernando Josseau, Paul Dehn and James Bernard won the Academy Award for Best Story for this film.

The Great Caruso

The Great Caruso is a 1951 biographical film made by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, and starring Mario Lanza as the great operatic tenor Enrico Caruso. It was directed by Richard Thorpe, and produced by Joe Pasternak, with Jesse L. Lasky as associate producer, from a screenplay by Sonya Levien and William Ludwig. The original music was by Johnny Green, and the cinematography by Joseph Ruttenberg. Costume design was by Helen Rose and Gile Steele.

The film is a highly fictionalized biography of the life of Caruso.

Two Tickets to Broadway

Two Tickets to Broadway is a 1951 American Technicolor musical film directed by James V. Kern and filmed on the RKO Forty Acres backlot. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Sound Recording (John O. Aalberg). The film was choreographed by Busby Berkeley.

The roles of the two delicatessen owners were originally offered to Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, who had to turn down the parts due to Laurel being ill.

Awards of Merit
Special awards
Former awards
Ceremonies‡
Footnote

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