23rd Primetime Emmy Awards

The 23rd Emmy Awards, later known as the 23rd Primetime Emmy Awards, were handed out on May 9, 1971. The ceremony was hosted by Johnny Carson. Winners are listed in bold and series' networks are in parentheses.

The top shows of the night were All in the Family and The Bold Ones: The Senator. The Bold Ones: The Senator, along with other shows, had the most major nominations (nine) and wins (four) on the night.

Actress Lee Grant set an Emmy milestone when she joined the exclusive club of actors who were nominated for two performances in the same acting category. She won the award for Outstanding Single Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role, for her performance in The Neon Ceiling, she was also nominated for an episode of Columbo.

Susan Hampshire became PBS' first win in the Lead Actress, Drama category, for The First Churchills, as well as being the network's first ever Acting win. (Hampshire also won in the same category, the previous year, again beating the Big Three television networks, but from the NET network, a network which dissolved within a year, but became the direct predecessor for PBS.)

David Burns became the second posthumous performance in Emmy history to win, for ITV Sunday Night Theatre.

23rd Primetime Emmy Awards
DateMay 9, 1971
LocationPantages Theatre,
Los Angeles, California
Presented byAcademy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted byJohnny Carson
Television/radio coverage
NetworkNBC

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Series - Comedy Outstanding Series - Drama
Outstanding Variety Series - Musical Outstanding Variety Series - Talk
Outstanding Single Program - Variety or Musical - Variety and Popular Music Outstanding Single Program - Variety or Musical - Classical Music
  • Singer Presents Burt Bacharach, (CBS)
    • Another Evening with Burt Bacharach, (NBC)
    • Harry and Lena, (ABC)
  • NET Festival, (Episode: "Leopold Stokowski"), (PBS)
    • NET Fanfare, (Episode: "Swan Lake"), (PBS)
    • NET Opera Theater, (Episode: "Queen of Spades"), (PBS)
Outstanding Achievement in Daytime Programming - Programs Outstanding Achievement in Children's Programming - Programs
Outstanding Achievement in Sports Programming Outstanding Single Program - Drama or Comedy
Outstanding New Series
  • All in the Family, (CBS)
    • The Bold Ones: The Senator, (NBC)
    • The Flip Wilson Show, (NBC)
    • Mary Tyler Moore, (CBS)
    • The Odd Couple, (ABC)

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Continued Performance
by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Continued Performance
by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Continued Performance
by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Dramatic Series
Outstanding Continued Performance
by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Dramatic Series

Supporting performances

Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Comedy Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Comedy
Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Drama Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Drama
  • David Burns as Mr. Solomon on Hallmark Hall of Fame, (Episode: "The Price"), (NBC)
    • James Brolin as Dr. Steven Kiley on Marcus Welby, M.D., (ABC)
    • Robert Young as Senator Earl Gannon on Vanished, (NBC)

Single performances

Outstanding Single Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role Outstanding Single Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role
  • George C. Scott as Victor Franz on Hallmark Hall of Fame, (Episode: "The Price"), (NBC)
    • Jack Cassidy as Otis Baker on The Andersonville Trial, (PBS)
    • Hal Holbrook as Senator Hays Stowe on The Bold Ones: The Senator, (Episode: "A Clear and Present Danger"), (NBC)
    • Richard Widmark as President Paul Roudebush on Vanished, (NBC)
    • Gig Young as Jones on The Neon Ceiling, (NBC)
  • Lee Grant as Carrie Miller on The Neon Ceiling, (NBC)
    • Colleen Dewhurst as Mrs. Franz on Hallmark Hall of Fame, (Episode: "The Price"), (NBC)
    • Lee Grant as Leslie Williams on Columbo, (Episode: "Ransom for a Dead Man"), (NBC)

Directing

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Drama -
A Single Program of a Series with Continuing Characters and/or Theme
  • Jay Sandrich for Mary Tyler Moore, (Episode: "Toulouse Lautrec is One of My Favorite Artists"), (CBS)
    • Alan Rafkin for Mary Tyler Moore, (Episode: "Support Your Local Mother"), (CBS)
    • John Rich for All in the Family, (Episode: "Gloria's Pregnancy"), (CBS)
  • Daryl Duke for The Bold Ones: The Senator, (Episode: "The Day the Lion Died"), (NBC)
Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy, Variety or Music Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Drama - A Single Program
Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Variety or Music

Writing

Outstanding Writing Achievement in Comedy Outstanding Writing Achievement in Drama
  • Joel Oliansky for The Bold Ones: The Senator, (Episode: "To Taste of Death But Once"), (NBC)
    • Jerrold Freedman, for The Psychiatrist, (NBC)
    • David W. Rintels for The Bold Ones: The Senator, (Episode: "A Continual Roar of Musketry"), (NBC)
Outstanding Writing Achievement in Comedy, Variety or Music Outstanding Writing Achievement in Variety or Music
  • Singer Presents Burt Bacharach, (CBS)
    • The Doris Mary Anne Kappelhoff Special, (CBS)
    • Jack Benny's Twentieth Anniversary Special, (NBC)
Outstanding Writing Achievement in Drama - Original Teleplay Outstanding Writing Achievement in Drama - Adaptation
  • Tracy Keenan Wynn, Marvin Schwartz for Tribes, (ABC)
    • David Karp, for The Brotherhood of the Bell, (CBS)
    • William Read Woodfield, Allan Balter for San Francisco International Airport, (NBC)
  • Saul Levitt for The Andersonville Trial, (PBS)
    • John Barton, for Hallmark Hall of Fame, (Episode: "Hamlet"), (NBC)
    • Dean Riesner for Vanished, (NBC)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
  • NBC – 46
  • CBS – 29
  • ABC – 23
  • PBS – 11
By program
  • The Bold Ones: The Senator (NBC) / Hallmark Hall of Fame (NBC) – 9
  • Mary Tyler Moore (CBS) – 8
  • All in the Family (CBS) – 7
  • The Flip Wilson Show (NBC) / Marcus Welby, M.D. (ABC) / The Odd Couple (ABC) / Vanished (NBC) – 4

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
  • NBC – 14
  • CBS – 9
  • PBS – 5
  • ABC – 3
By program
  • The Bold Ones: The Senator (NBC) / Hallmark Hall of Fame (NBC) / Mary Tyler Moore (CBS) – 4
  • All in the Family (CBS) – 3
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

References

  1. ^ Emmys.com list of 1971 Nominees & Winners

External links

24th Primetime Emmy Awards

The 24th Emmy Awards, later known as the 24th Primetime Emmy Awards, were handed out on May 6, 1972. The ceremony was hosted by Johnny Carson. Winners are listed in bold and series' networks are in parentheses.

The top shows of the night were All in the Family and Elizabeth R. All in the Family set numerous records during the night, it became the first show to win six major awards, (although one came in a tie, this record would be broken by other shows that won six major awards outright). It also became the first non-anthology drama to receive at least ten major nominations.

A milestone was set when All in the Family and Columbo each received every nomination in a major category, both for writing. This feat has become extremely rare as the field of nominees expanded to five and later six.

Glenda Jackson also made history by receiving three acting nominations for the same performance as Queen Elizabeth I in Elizabeth R. Rule changes have made this impossible in later ceremonies. In addition, by beating the Big Three TV networks, this was PBS' first win for Outstanding Drama. (Though the N.E.T. network was the first to win this award, against the Big Three, in 1969, NET would eventually dissolve, but would become the direct predecessor to PBS.) This show was also the first non-American made show to win this award.

43rd Academy Awards

The 43rd Academy Awards ceremony, presented by Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, was held on April 15, 1971, and took place at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to honor the best films of 1970. The Awards presentation, hosting duties were handled by 34 "Friends of Oscar" and broadcast by NBC for the first time in 11 years.

It was during this ceremony that George C. Scott became the first actor to reject an Oscar, claiming that the Academy Awards were "a two-hour meat parade, a public display with contrived suspense for economic reasons."With her Best Supporting Actress win, Helen Hayes became the first performer to win Oscars in both lead and supporting categories (having won Best Actress 38 years before for The Sin of Madelon Claudet). She also has the record of having the biggest gap between acting wins.

The documentary film Woodstock garnered three Oscar nominations, making it the most nominated documentary film in Oscar history.

This was the only time since the 2nd Academy Awards that all five nominees for Best Actress were first-time nominees, as well as the last time that either lead acting category had all new nominees. Also, this was the first time since the 7th Academy Awards in which none of the nominees for the Academy Award for Best Actor had a previous nomination in that category.

44th Academy Awards

The 44th Academy Awards were presented April 10, 1972, at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. The ceremonies were presided over by Helen Hayes, Alan King, Sammy Davis Jr., and Jack Lemmon. One of the highlights of the evening was the appearance of Betty Grable, battling cancer at the time, who made one of her last public appearances. She appeared along with one of her leading men from the 1940s, singer Dick Haymes, to present the musical scoring awards. Grable died the following year. This was the first time in the history of the Awards in which the nominees were shown on superimposed pictures while being announced.

Batjac Productions

Batjac Productions is an independent film production company co-founded by John Wayne in 1952 as a vehicle for Wayne to produce as well as star in movies. Its first release was Big Jim McLain with Warner Bros. in 1952, and its final film was also with Warner Bros., McQ, in 1974. After the actor's death, his son Michael Wayne managed and owned the company for over 30 years before he died in 2003, at which time his wife Gretchen took over as owner and president.

List of Bewitched episodes

Bewitched is an American fantasy situation comedy originally broadcast for eight seasons on ABC from 1964-72. Film dates are the dates the Screen Gems distribution company reported the episode was "finished".

Perc Westmore

Percival Harry Westmore (29 October 1904 – 30 September 1970) was a prominent member of the Westmore family of Hollywood make-up artists. He rose to the position of Head of the Warner Bros. make-up department, and with his brothers founded the studio "The House of Westmore" on Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles. He worked with well-known Hollywood actresses of the period, including Lauren Bacall, Bette Davis and Kay Francis. He was married on four occasions, and collected cuttings relating to the Westmore family throughout his life which were subsequently donated to Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences after his death.

Scott Harper (composer)

Scott Elder Harper (born Scott Gleckler; December 22, 1952) is an American composer, arranger and musician for motion picture and television scores and orchestra, as well as a multi-instrumentalist, conductor, and session-player for pop music. With a background in popular music, Harper has composed theater pieces, oratorios, orchestral chamber works, and dynamic and diverse ensemble arrangements with various instrumental combinations for popular recording artists and film scores alike. His work includes conducting and album arrangements for Celine Dion, Cher, and Olivia Newton-John. He has performed on multiple original motion picture soundtracks such as E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.(1983), Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) scored by John Williams and The Right Stuff (1983) by Bill Conti as a Double bass player in the Hollwood Studio Symphony Orchestra, and also composed several original scores for documentary feature films.

Sisters at Heart

"Sisters at Heart" is the thirteenth episode of the seventh season, and 213th episode overall, of the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) fantasy television sitcom Bewitched. This Christmas episode aired on ABC on December 24, 1970, and again the following December.

The narrative follows Lisa Wilson (Venetta Rogers), an African-American girl, as she visits her friend Tabitha Stephens (Erin Murphy), a white girl. Meanwhile, Tabitha's father Darrin Stephens (Dick Sargent), who works at an advertising agency, fails to land a million-dollar account with toy company owner Mr. Brockway (Parley Baer) because Mr. Brockway is racist and incorrectly believes Darrin to be married to Lisa's mother Dorothy (Janee Michelle). In an attempt to convince Mr. Brockway to overcome his bigotry, Darrin's wife Samantha (Elizabeth Montgomery), who is a witch, casts a spell on Mr. Brockway so he sees everyone, including himself, as having black skin.

The story of "Sisters at Heart" was written by 26 African-American students from a tenth grade English class at Jefferson High School after Montgomery and her husband William Asher, the director of the episode, had the students visit the set of Bewitched. Most students at the school were unable to read, write, or comprehend at a high school level, with 44% reading at a third grade level and very few students reading at a level much higher than that. Sargent said that the students, "who might have been stuck in the ghetto for the rest of their lives, loved Bewitched, and with just a little approval and motivation, came alive on the set." Montgomery considered "Sisters at Heart" her favorite episode of the series, and said that it "was created in the true spirit of Christmas ... conceived in the image of innocence and filled with truth." The episode received the Governors Award at the 23rd Primetime Emmy Awards ceremony in 1971. Montgomery's biographer Herbie Pilato wrote that "no episode of the series more clearly represented [the] cry against prejudice" than "Sisters at Heart". Critic Walter Metz praised Asher's choice of camera angles, but denounced the episode's liberalism as excessively sentimental and simplistic.

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