21st Century Media

21st Century Media was an American media company. It is the successor of Ingersoll Publications[1] and Journal Register Company.[2]

The company operated more than 350 multi-platform products in 992 communities. On April 5, 2013, the assets of Journal Register Company and its affiliates were sold to 21st CMH Acquisition Co. The Journal Register Company then became known as 21st Century Media.[2]

The company was led by CEO John Paton who openly blogged about the changes he is making to transform Journal Register from a newspaper company to a "digital first, print last" company. Paton, formerly CEO of ImpreMedia, started on February 1, 2010, by announcing he would provide all reporters with Flip video cameras as a sign of his commitment to the company's digital transformation.

On March 17, 2010, the company named an advisory board composed of new media visionary Jeff Jarvis (author of "What Would Google Do" and BuzzMachine); Jay Rosen of New York University who is currently running the innovative Studio 20 program at NYU and who writes for the website "PressThink" (Rosen is also a former member of Wikimedia Foundation's advisory board); and Emily Bell, the director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University.

On March 11, 2010, the company named Bill Higginson, Journal Register's former Senior Vice President, Production, as the company's President and COO. On March 4, 2010, the company named Jeff Bairstow as chief financial officer. Bairstow joined Journal Register after working for Synarc Inc., a leading provider of medical imaging analysis, subject-recruitment and biochemical-marker services.

In 2013, MediaNews Group and 21st Century Media merged into Digital First Media.[3]

21st Century Media
Subsidiary of Digital First Media
IndustryMedia
SuccessorDigital First Media
Founded1959
FounderRalph Ingersoll and Mark Goodson
Defunct2013
Headquarters
Websitewww.21stcenturynewspapers.com

Properties

The company owned daily and weekly newspapers, other print media properties and newspaper-affiliated local Web sites in the U.S. states of Connecticut, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. It also operated 3 commercial printing facilities.

21st Century Media's flagship daily newspaper was the New Haven Register. Its ten largest daily newspapers (approximate daily circulation over 20,000) were:

History

In 2004, JRC bought 21st Century Newspapers, gaining ownership of several daily newspapers in Greater Detroit.

In 2006, JRC bought the Web site JobsInTheUS.com. It is also a major shareholder in consulting company PowerOne Media. That same year, the company moved its headquarters to Yardley, Pennsylvania from Trenton, New Jersey.

In early 2007, JRC completed the sales of its former Massachusetts and Rhode Island newspapers to GateHouse Media and RISN Operations, respectively.

In early 2008, the New York Stock Exchange announced it was planning to suspend trading of JRC's common stock. The stock had been below $1.05 for 30 consecutive days, at one point falling to 16 cents, which was the all-time low at that time. The stock was delisted as of April 16.

On February 21, 2009, the company filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in the US Bankruptcy Court, located in Manhattan, New York, NY.

On August 12, 2009, JRC emerged from bankruptcy as a private company.

On September 5, 2012, Digital First Media, parent company of JRC, confirmed the group had again filed for bankruptcy protection.[4]

On April 5, 2013, the assets of Journal Register Company and its affiliates were sold to 21st CMH Acquisition Co., an affiliate of funds managed by Alden Global Capital. The Journal Register Company then became known as 21st Century Media and continued to be managed by Digital First Media.[2]

References

  1. ^ "UPDATE 3-Journal Register Co seeks bankruptcy protection". Reuters. 2009-02-21. Retrieved 2013-12-03.
  2. ^ a b c "Digital First Media Announces Journal Register Company Sale Complete" (Press release). Digital First Media. April 5, 2013. Retrieved November 4, 2013.
  3. ^ "MediaNews Group and 21st Century Media Transaction Has Been Finalized" (Press release). Digitalfirstmedia.com. 2013-12-30. Retrieved 2014-06-29.
  4. ^ Hagey, Keach; Feintzeig, Rachel (September 6, 2012). "Journal Register in Chapter 11 Again". The Wall Street Journal. p. B3.

Further reading

External links

Daily Freeman

The Daily Freeman is a seven-day-a-week morning newspaper in Kingston, New York, the Ulster County seat. Serving all of Ulster County and parts of three other counties in the Mid-Hudson Valley, including parts of Greene and Columbia counties and Northern Dutchess County.

The broadsheet publication was founded in 1871 as the Rondout Daily Freeman and was located in Downtown Kingston on the Rondout–West Strand Historic District. It relocated to its current Hurley Avenue headquarters in Uptown Kingston in November 1974.The Freeman is a unionized newspaper. Employees are represented by the Kingston Newspaper Guild. The paper is owned by 21st-Century Media, which is part of Digital First Media.

Daily Local News

The Daily Local News is a daily newspaper that covers events in Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA, with limited coverage in neighboring Lancaster and Delaware Counties due to school districts and interscholastic league coverage in these two neighboring counties. First published in West Chester in 1872, the newspaper in 2011 was owned by the Journal Register Company.

Delaware County Daily Times

The Delaware County Daily Times is a daily newspaper published in the Primos section of Upper Darby Township, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is the only major newspaper in the state to be branded with a county name rather than a city. It is known for its colorful "Sound Off" feature and allowing voices from the community on either side of the political spectrum to be heard.

The newspaper began as the Chester Daily Times in 1876. Its current name was adopted in 1959 and its offices left the economically declining City of Chester, Pennsylvania for Primos, an unincorporated postal designation in Upper Darby Township. According to the Journal Register Company, it has the largest circulation of any suburban paper in the Philadelphia area. The Sunday edition is known as the Delaware County Sunday Times.

New Haven Register

The New Haven Register is a daily newspaper published in New Haven, Connecticut. It is owned by Hearst Newspapers. The Register's main office is located at 100 Gando Drive in New Haven.

The Register covers 19 towns and cities within New Haven and Middlesex counties, including New Haven. The newspaper also had one reporter in Hartford, the state capital, who covered state politics, but as of March 2008 removed that reporter, leaving New Haven's major daily without day-to-day coverage of state offices and the General Assembly. In order to fill that void, the paper signed a deal with CTNewsJunkie.com to provide coverage of the Connecticut state government.

Press-Telegram

The Press-Telegram is a paid daily newspaper published in Long Beach, California. Coverage area for the Press-Telegram includes Long Beach, Lakewood, Signal Hill, Artesia, Bellflower, Cerritos, Compton, Downey, Hawaiian Gardens, Lynwood, Norwalk and Paramount.

The Press-Telegram's precursor, the Press, was first published in 1897. The Press was purchased in the early 20th century by Charles H. Prisk and William F. Prisk, Charles being the owner and William the editor and publisher. Sometime after 1918 the Press was merged with another paper, the Daily Telegram; the combined paper was first published under the name Daily Press then, from 1924, the Press-Telegram.On September 30, 1933, the Press-Telegram published what David Dayen called "One of the more influential letters to the editor in American history": Francis Townsend's letter outlining the Townsend Plan, a proposal that sparked a national campaign which influenced the establishment of the Roosevelt administration's Social Security system.In 1952, the Independent (founded in 1938) was merged into the Press-Telegram, creating the Independent-Press-Telegram with the Independent being the paper's morning edition and the Press-Telegram the evening edition. The Independent was discontinued in 1981, leaving only the Press-Telegram (now published in the morning) as the paper's only edition.The paper was owned by Ridder Publications and its successor Knight Ridder from 1952 to 1997, when it was acquired by its current owner, the Los Angeles Newspaper Group (then a division of newspaper conglomerate MediaNews Group). In 2013, MediaNews Group and 21st Century Media merged into Digital First Media.An online version of the paper began web publication in 1995. In 2011, the paper eliminated its sports, photography, and features departments. Some of the eliminated positions were picked up by the Torrance Daily Breeze, another Los Angeles Newspaper Group paper.The paper's longtime home, the Press-Telegram building at 6th Street and Pine Avenue, was sold late 2006 to real estate developers intending to convert the property into condominiums. The paper's operations were moved to the Arco Center in downtown Long Beach. The building at 6th Street and Pine Avenue in downtown Long Beach occupied nearly the entire block, and at one time encompassed the entire production of the paper, including the presses, which were formerly visible behind glass windows at street level. The old building on Pine Avenue was eventually acquired and redeveloped by Molina Healthcare. The paper is currently located at 5225 E. Second St., Suite 400

Long Beach, CA 90803.

For the 2016 Presidential Election, the paper chose to endorse no candidate.

The Daily Progress

The Daily Progress is the sole daily newspaper in the vicinity of Charlottesville, Virginia. It has been published daily since September 14, 1892. The paper was founded by James Hubert Lindsay and his brother Frank Lindsay. The Progress was initially published six days a week; the first Sunday edition was printed in September 1968. Lindsay's family owned the paper for 78 years. On November 30, 1970, the family announced a sale to the Worrell Newspaper group, which took over on January 1, 1971.T. Eugene Worrell, of Bristol, Virginia, owned about two dozen rural weekly newspapers and a few dailies, all with less circulation than the Daily Progress. The Progress immediately became the group's flagship paper, and Worrell moved his newspaper group headquarters to Charlottesville.

Faced with major newspaper industry change, in 1995 Worrell sold his newspaper properties to Richmond-based Media General, which was later purchased by Nexstar Media Group, as a part of a larger $230M deal.

In the 21st century, Media General sold the Progress' printing press, and reorganized its operations to print multiple newspapers from other printing plants it controlled.

On May 17, 2012 Media General, Inc. announced signed agreements with Berkshire Hathaway, Inc., whereby a subsidiary of Berkshire Hathaway, BH Media Group, will purchase newspapers owned by Media General, including the Progress.Following the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville in August 2017, Paul Chadwick of The Guardian wrote that the staff of the Progress "demonstrate in a practical, relatable way the importance of journalism to community, civil society and functioning democracy."Ryan M. Kelly, who worked for the newspaper at the time, took a photograph of the Aug 12 vehicular attack that resulted in the death of Heather Heyer won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.

The Macomb Daily

The Macomb Daily is a daily newspaper with its headquarters in Clinton Township, Macomb County, Michigan in Metro Detroit. It is the only daily newspaper serving Macomb County, making the county the largest in Michigan in terms of population with only one daily newspaper. It is owned by Digital First Media.

The Macomb Daily is co-owned with the Oakland Press and the (Royal Oak) Daily Tribune, both in Oakland County, and the (Southgate) News-Herald. As a result of their co-ownership, staff writers from those newspapers often appear in The Macomb Daily, and staff writers of the Daily appear in those same newspapers in return. The two Macomb Daily staff writers who appear most often in the other Journal Register newspapers in the Detroit area are Chuck Pleiness and Fred Costello, the Journal Register group's Detroit Red Wings beat writers. The writers from the other Detroit area Journal Register newspapers who appear frequently in The Macomb Daily are Oakland Press staff writers Gary Graff (who covers pop music), Jim Hawkins (Detroit Tigers), Paula Pasche (Detroit Lions), and Dave Pemberton (Detroit Pistons and Michigan State Spartans) and the News-Herald's Matthew Mowery (Michigan Wolverines).

The Macomb Daily was formed by the merger of The Mt. Clemens Monitor Leader, The South Macomb News and The Tri City Progress in 1964. Panax Newspapers owned the newly merged paper until owner John McGoff got into legal problems accepting money from the South African government. The Macomb Daily was part of Global Communication and later SEM Newspapers in the late 1970s and 1980s. The Macomb Daily operated Monday thru Saturday and grew rapidly from 38,000 to 56,000 newspapers daily. This rapid expansion forced the owners to build a new printing plant in Clinton Township on 15 Mile and Garfield at 35110 Garfield Road, which has since expanded and is still printing many of the chain newspapers, along with some commercial printing. The Macomb Daily was one of the first daily newspapers to automate its circulation onto computers. The paper has a large fleet of 20 delivery vans that date back to 1977, with the Ford Macomb Daily Blue with White strips. In 1982 The Macomb Daily decided to make The Community News its TMC edition in the south end and The Advisor in the northern end of the county.

The Macomb Daily leased a new editorial and business operation center at 100 Macomb Daily Lane on the shores of the Clinton River in Mt.Clemens, just outside the downtown core of Mt. Clemens in 1994. In 2015 the paper moved to 19176 Hall Rd. in Clinton Township.

The Macomb Daily is known for a conservative editorial viewpoint. It expanded to publishing 7 days a week around the late 1990s.

The Mercury (Pennsylvania)

The Mercury is a daily newspaper published in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, United States.

The Middletown Press

The Middletown Press is a newspaper based in Middletown, Connecticut that is the main daily newspaper of Middletown and its surrounding area in Middlesex County, Connecticut.

It was founded in 1878 as the Middlesex Monitor, a daily flyer, by Ernest King and his son Ernest. It carried information about the 1884 presidential elections. It became a one-cent daily newspaper (also called a penny press). The name would later change to The Evening Press when its price went up to two cents in 1918, and one year later it became The Middletown Press in 1919.“It was blatantly a Democratic paper in a town dominated by Democrats,” in its early history, according to Elizabeth A. Warner, author of A Pictorial History of Middletown, who credits the overt political affiliation as part of the reason for its success.Competitors then or over the years included weekly papers The Sentinel and Witness and The Constitution and daily The Daily Herald (all of which may not have been Middletown focused). Direct competition on Middletown news was provided by The Middletown Tribune, a Republican newspaper, that was established in 1893 and operated until 1906, and later by The Middletown Times which operated during 1913-1914. Otherwise, "the Middletown Press had a monopoly on Middletown news."It was later owned by Berkshire, Massachusetts-based Eagle Publishing Company, publisher of the Berkshire Eagle and other papers. The Eagle's last independent publisher was Michael G. Miller, grandson of Kelton Bedell Miller, who founded the paper. Michael was president of The Eagle Publishing Company which owned The Eagle, the Middletown Press in Middletown, Connecticut, and two daily newspapers in Vermont: the Bennington Banner and the Brattleboro Reformer, as well as a weekly newspaper, the Journal in Manchester, Vermont; his brother Mark C. Miller was editor of The Eagle, while brother Kelton B. Miller II was publisher of the Vermont newspapers. A sister, Margo Miller, a writer for The Boston Globe, sat on Eagle Publishing's board. The Eagle paper was said to be struggling financially in the early 1990s, burdened by mismanagement and debt incurred by the decision to purchase new multi-million dollar four-color printing presses. That purchase necessitated that the company expand into larger quarters.

In 1995, The Middletown Press was purchased, along with other New England newspapers, by MediaNews Group.

It was sold soon after to Journal Register Company.In 2013, the Journal Register Company became known as 21st Century Media, an American media company.

21st Century Media was an American media company, serving an audience of 21 million Americans in 992 communities. It is the successor of Ingersoll Publications and Journal Register Company.

The company operated more than 350 multi-platform products in 992 communities. On April 5, 2013, the assets of Journal Register Company and its affiliates were sold to 21st CMH Acquisition Co. The Journal Register Company then became known as 21st Century Media.The company was led by CEO John Paton who openly blogged about the changes he is making to transform Journal Register from a newspaper company to a "digital first, print last" company. Paton, formerly CEO of ImpreMedia, started on February 1, 2010 by announcing he would provide all reporters with Flip video cameras as a sign of his commitment to the company's digital transformation.

On March 17, 2010, the company named an advisory board composed of new media visionary Jeff Jarvis (author of "What Would Google Do" and BuzzMachine); Jay Rosen of New York University who is currently running the innovative Studio 20 program at NYU and who writes pressthink.org (Rosen is also a former member of Wikimedia Foundation's advisory board); and Emily Bell, the director of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University.

On March 11, 2010, the company named Bill Higginson, Journal Register's former Senior Vice President, Production, as the company's President and COO. *On March 4, 2010, the company named Jeff Bairstow as chief financial officer. Bairstow joined Journal Register after working for Synarc Inc., a leading provider of medical imaging analysis, subject-recruitment and biochemical-marker services.

In 2013, MediaNews Group and 21st Century Media merged into Digital First Media.It was included in the Connecticut cluster of newspapers, one of six clusters, owned by 21st Century Media. In 2017, 21st Century Media/Digital First Media sold its Connecticut papers to Hearst Communications in 2017.The Middletown Press is now a daily broadsheet which covers news in the Middletown area. The Hartford Courant is a daily broadsheet which includes a Middletown story in every issue.

The Monterey County Herald

The Monterey County Herald, sometimes referred to as the Monterey Herald, is a daily newspaper published in Monterey, California that serves Monterey County.

In December, 2013, the Herald's parent company Media News Group merged to become Digital First Media. In the year to come, the paper underwent a "reorganization plan" which included a redesign of both the newspaper and website, the move of newspaper production out-of-area, as well as a change in editor.

The Morning Journal

The Morning Journal is a daily newspaper based in Lorain, Ohio. Originally the Lorain Journal, it was an afternoon paper which was historically more popular in an industrial town like Lorain, but switched to morning publication in the 1980s.

It is the primary paper in the city of Lorain, but also serves the wider area of Lorain, Erie, and Huron counties, and the western Cleveland suburbs.

The News-Herald (Ohio)

The News-Herald is a newspaper distributed in the northeastern portion of Greater Cleveland, Ohio, United States, serving Lake and Geauga Counties as well as a section of eastern Cuyahoga County.

The News-Herald (Southgate, Michigan)

The News-Herald is a bi-weekly newspaper serving the Downriver suburbs of Detroit. It is based in Southgate, Michigan, and owned by Digital First Media as part of its Detroit region.The newspaper is published every Wednesday and Sunday.

The Oakland Press

The Oakland Press is a daily newspaper published in Oakland County, Michigan with headquarters in Pontiac. It is owned by 21st Century Media, with which its parent company merged in 2013 after filing for bankruptcy. The local historical society traces its origins to The Pontiac Gazette, founded in 1843. The paper has been published under various names, including The Pontiac Press, until it was renamed The Oakland Press in 1972. Original editorials and reporting, including major-sport beat writers, are also carried in the sister paper The Macomb Daily.

The Record (Troy)

The Record (also known as The Troy Record) is a tabloid-style daily newspaper published in Troy, New York. The paper has been published regularly since 1896. It covers all of New York's Capital Region and specifically the city of Troy, which is the third largest city in the Capital area. On September 1, 2005, The Record changed from a traditional broadsheet layout to a tabloid format similar to that of certain big-city newspapers. The paper is owned by 21st Century Media. Its offices are located on Broadway in downtown Troy.The Record is the official newspaper of the City of Cohoes.

The Saratogian

The Saratogian is a broadsheet-style daily newspaper published in Saratoga Springs, New York, United States. The paper has been published daily since 1855, first as The Daily Saratogian, and then as The Saratogian beginning in 1910.It covers all of Saratoga County, New York and specifically the city of Saratoga Springs. It includes the Pinksheet in the summer, which has information about what will happen at the Saratoga Race Course that very day.

The Saratogian was owned by Gannett from 1934 to 1998, when it was sold to the Journal Register Company, now known as 21st Century Media, a subsidiary of Digital First Media.

The Trentonian

The Trentonian is a daily newspaper serving Trenton, New Jersey, USA, and the surrounding Mercer County community. The paper has a daily circulation of slightly more than 20,000 and a Sunday circulation of less than 18,000.

The paper is owned by Digital First Media, a media company headquartered in Denver, Colorado, specializing in newspaper publishing, which owns 75 daily and several hundred non-daily newspapers in the United States. DFM was formed as a merger between Media News Group, MNG, and Journal Register Company, JRC.

In November 2008, DFM announced that some of its newspapers, including The Trentonian, were being put up for sale and the newspaper's daily price increased 43 percent, from 35 cents to 50 cents. Also, the company announced that The Trentonian would no longer be printed in Trenton beginning in January 2009. It will be printed at a JRC-owned facility in Exton, Pa., and delivered to Trenton.

The Trentonian was known as a feisty, gritty tabloid from its start in 1946 when 40 members of the International Typographical Union broke away from the (Trenton) Times to start their own paper.When The Washington Post Company bought the Times in 1975, Katharine Graham vowed to make Trenton a one-paper town. She reportedly would later admit that Trenton was her "Vietnam."The book Tabloid From Hell details what the author considers to be the decline of The Trentonian, with much of the blame directed at Robert M. Jelenic, JRC's former CEO, whom the author says spent too much time on discipline and trivial matters, not enough on quality journalism. A Mary Walton interview in American Journalism Review was also critical of Jelenic.

Ypsilanti Courier

The Ypsilanti Courier is a weekly newspaper based in Ypsilanti, Michigan. The Ypsilanti Courier is part of Heritage Newspapers, a conglomerate of weekly newspapers in Washtenaw County owned by 21st Century Media, part of Digital First Media. The newspaper provides news, life, sports and entertainment news from Ypsilanti and Washtenaw County, Michigan.

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