20th parallel north

The 20th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 20 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane. It crosses Africa, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, North America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic Ocean.

The parallel defines part of the border between Libya and Sudan, and within Sudan it defines the border between the Northern and North Darfur states.

At this latitude the sun is visible for 13 hours, 21 minutes during the summer solstice and 10 hours, 55 minutes during the winter solstice.[1]

Line across the Earth
20°
20th parallel north
20th parallel Africa
In Africa, the parallel defines part of the border between Libya and Sudan.

Around the world

Starting at the Prime Meridian and heading eastwards, the parallel 20° north passes through:

Co-ordinates Country, territory or sea Notes
20°0′N 0°0′E / 20.000°N 0.000°E  Mali
20°0′N 2°43′E / 20.000°N 2.717°E  Algeria
20°0′N 6°27′E / 20.000°N 6.450°E  Niger
20°0′N 15°47′E / 20.000°N 15.783°E  Chad
20°0′N 23°3′E / 20.000°N 23.050°E  Libya
20°0′N 24°0′E / 20.000°N 24.000°E  Libya /  Sudan border
20°0′N 25°0′E / 20.000°N 25.000°E  Sudan The parallel defines the border between the Northern and North Darfur states
20°0′N 37°11′E / 20.000°N 37.183°E Red Sea
20°0′N 40°28′E / 20.000°N 40.467°E  Saudi Arabia
20°0′N 55°0′E / 20.000°N 55.000°E  Oman
20°0′N 57°48′E / 20.000°N 57.800°E Indian Ocean Arabian Sea - Passing just south of Masirah Island,  Oman
20°0′N 72°43′E / 20.000°N 72.717°E  India Maharashtra
Chhattisgarh
Orissa
Chhattisgarh
Orissa
20°0′N 86°23′E / 20.000°N 86.383°E Indian Ocean Bay of Bengal
20°0′N 92°57′E / 20.000°N 92.950°E  Myanmar (Burma)
20°0′N 99°3′E / 20.000°N 99.050°E  Thailand
20°0′N 100°32′E / 20.000°N 100.533°E  Laos
20°0′N 104°58′E / 20.000°N 104.967°E  Vietnam Thanh Hoa
20°0′N 106°11′E / 20.000°N 106.183°E South China Sea Gulf of Tonkin
20°0′N 110°8′E / 20.000°N 110.133°E  People's Republic of China Island of Hainan — passing just south of Haikou
20°0′N 110°56′E / 20.000°N 110.933°E South China Sea
20°0′N 122°0′E / 20.000°N 122.000°E Pacific Ocean Philippine Sea
- Passing between the Batanes and Babuyan islands,  Philippines
- Passing just south of the Maug Islands,  Northern Mariana Islands
into an unnamed part of the Ocean
20°0′N 155°50′W / 20.000°N 155.833°W  United States Big Island, Hawaii
20°0′N 155°15′W / 20.000°N 155.250°W Pacific Ocean
20°0′N 105°31′W / 20.000°N 105.517°W  Mexico Jalisco
Michoacan
Guanajuato
Querétaro
Mexico State
Hidalgo
Puebla
Veracruz
20°0′N 96°33′W / 20.000°N 96.550°W Gulf of Mexico Bay of Campeche
20°0′N 90°28′W / 20.000°N 90.467°W  Mexico Campeche
Yucatán
Quintana Roo
20°0′N 87°28′W / 20.000°N 87.467°W Caribbean Sea
20°0′N 77°38′W / 20.000°N 77.633°W  Cuba
20°0′N 74°52′W / 20.000°N 74.867°W Caribbean Sea Windward Passage
20°0′N 72°43′W / 20.000°N 72.717°W  Haiti Island of Tortuga
20°0′N 74°52′W / 20.000°N 74.867°W Atlantic Ocean Passing just north of the island of Hispaniola,  Dominican Republic
20°0′N 16°14′W / 20.000°N 16.233°W  Mauritania
20°0′N 5°59′W / 20.000°N 5.983°W  Mali

See also

References

  1. ^ http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/Dur_OneYear.php
1982 Pacific hurricane season

The 1982 Pacific hurricane season, with 23 named storms, ranks as the fourth-most active Pacific hurricane season on record, tied with 2018. It was at that time the most active season in the basin until it was later surpassed by the 1992 season. It officially started June 1, 1982, in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1982, in the central Pacific, and lasted until October 31, 1982, in the central Pacific and until November 15, 1982, in the Eastern Pacific. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. At that time, the season was considered as the most active season within the basin; however, the 1992 season surpassed these numbers a decade later.

The 1982 season was an eventful one. Hurricane Paul killed over 1,000 people before it was named. Hurricanes Daniel and Gilma both briefly threatened Hawaii, while Hurricane Iwa caused heavy damage to Kauai and Niihau. The remnants of Hurricane Olivia brought heavy rain to a wide swath of the western United States.

19th parallel north

The 19th parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 19 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane. It crosses Africa, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, North America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic Ocean.

At this latitude the sun is visible for 13 hours, 17 minutes during the summer solstice and 10 hours, 59 minutes during the winter solstice.

20th parallel

20th parallel may refer to:

20th parallel north, a circle of latitude in the Northern Hemisphere

20th parallel south, a circle of latitude in the Southern Hemisphere

21st parallel north

The 21st parallel north is a circle of latitude that is 21 degrees north of the Earth's equatorial plane. It crosses Africa, Asia, the Indian Ocean, the Pacific Ocean, North America, the Caribbean and the Atlantic Ocean.

At this latitude the sun is visible for 13 hours, 25 minutes during the summer solstice and 10 hours, 51 minutes during the winter solstice.

Cold-core low

A cold-core low, also known as an upper level low or cold-core cyclone, is a cyclone aloft which has an associated cold pool of air residing at high altitude within the Earth's troposphere. It is a low pressure system that strengthens with height in accordance with the thermal wind relationship. If a weak surface circulation forms in response to such a feature at subtropical latitudes of the eastern north Pacific or north Indian oceans, it is called a subtropical cyclone. Cloud cover and rainfall mainly occurs with these systems during the day. Severe weather, such as tornadoes, can occur near the center of cold-core lows. Cold lows can help spawn cyclones with significant weather impacts, such as polar lows, and Kármán vortices. Cold lows can lead directly to the development of tropical cyclones, owing to their associated cold pool of air aloft or by acting as additional outflow channels to aid in further development.

List of circles of latitude

Following is a list of circles of latitude on Earth.

R136a1

RMC 136a1 (usually abbreviated to R136a1) is a Wolf–Rayet star located at the center of R136, the central concentration of stars of the large NGC 2070 open cluster in the Tarantula Nebula. It lies at a distance of about 49.97 kiloparsecs (163,000 light-years) in a neighbouring galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud. It has the highest mass and luminosity of any known star, at 315 M☉ and 8.7 million L☉, and is also one of the hottest, at around 53,000 K.

Upper tropospheric cyclonic vortex

An upper tropospheric cyclonic vortex is a vortex, or a circulation with a definable center, that usually moves slowly from east-northeast to west-southwest and is prevalent across Northern Hemisphere's warm season. Its circulations generally do not extend below 6,080 metres (19,950 ft) in altitude, as it is an example of a cold-core low. A weak inverted wave in the easterlies is generally found beneath it, and it may also be associated with broad areas of high-level clouds. Downward development results in an increase of cumulus clouds and the appearance of circulation at ground level. In rare cases, a warm-core cyclone can develop in its associated convective activity, resulting in a tropical cyclone and a weakening and southwest movement of the nearby upper tropospheric cyclonic vortex. Symbiotic relationships can exist between tropical cyclones and the upper level lows in their wake, with the two systems occasionally leading to their mutual strengthening. When they move over land during the warm season, an increase in monsoon rains occurs.

VA-52 (U.S. Navy)

VA-52 was an Attack Squadron of the U.S. Navy. It was established as U.S. Navy Reserve Fighter Squadron VF-884 on 1 November 1949, and called to active duty on 20 July 1950. It was redesignated VF-144 on 4 February 1953, and VA-52 on 23 February 1959. The squadron was nicknamed the Bitter Birds from about 1951–1953, and the Knightriders from about 1960 onward. Its insignia evolved through several versions from 1951–1960. VA-52 was decommissioned on 31 March 1995.

Yemen Vilayet

Yemen Vilayet (Ottoman Turkish: ولايت یمن Vilâyet-i Yemen) was a first-level administrative division (vilayet) of the Ottoman Empire. At the beginning of the 20th century it reportedly had an area of 200,000 square kilometres (77,200 sq mi). The population for the vilayet is given by the 1885 Ottoman census as 2,500,000.Broadly speaking, the vilayet was bounded by the 20th parallel north to the north, the Aden protectorate to the south, the Red Sea to the west and the 45th meridian east to the east. The southern border was demarcated by the Anglo-Turkish Boundary Commission of 1902–1905, while the limit of the eastern border was left vague.

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