2020 NFL Draft

The 2020 NFL Draft will be the 85th annual meeting of National Football League (NFL) franchises to select newly eligible players. The draft is expected to be held from April 23 to 25, based on prior draft dates. It will be held in Paradise, Nevada.

2020 NFL Draft
General information
Date(s)April 23–25, 2020
Time8:00 PM ET
LocationParadise, Nevada
Network(s)ESPN, ESPN2, NFL Network
Overview
256 total selections in 7 rounds
LeagueNFL

Host City Bid Process

The host city for this draft would have been chosen from among finalists Denver, Kansas City, Las Vegas, Nashville, and Cleveland/Canton in May 2018 during the NFL Spring League Meeting,[1] when Nashville was chosen to host the 2019 draft. However, the host city for 2020 was deferred. After Denver withdrew, citing scheduling conflicts,[2] Las Vegas was chosen as the host on December 12, 2018.[3] The 2020 Draft being hosted in Las Vegas coincides with the scheduled arrival of the former Oakland Raiders in the city during the same offseason.

Trades

In the explanations below, (PD) indicates trades completed prior to the start of the draft (i.e. Pre-Draft), while (D) denotes trades that took place during the 2020 draft.

Round 1

  • Chicago → Las Vegas (PD). Chicago traded first- and third-round selections as well as 2019 first- and sixth-round selections to Oakland (to be known as Las Vegas by the draft) in exchange for the Raiders' defensive end/outside linebacker Khalil Mack, a second-round selection, and a fifth-round conditional selection (condition unknown).[trade 1]

Round 2

  • Kansas City → Seattle (PD). Kansas City traded a second-round selection and 2019 first and third-round selections to Seattle in exchange for a 2019 third-round selection and defensive end Frank Clark.[trade 2] The condition to the trade is that Seattle will receive the lower of Kansas City or San Francisco’s 2020 2nd round selections.
  • Las Vegas → Chicago (PD). See Chicago → Las Vegas.[trade 1]
  • New Orleans → Miami (PD). New Orleans traded a second-round selection to Miami in exchange for a 2019 second-round selection.[trade 3]
  • San Francisco → Kansas City (PD). San Francisco traded a second-round selection to Kansas City in exchange for defensive end/outside linebacker Dee Ford.[trade 4]
  • Washington → Indianapolis (PD). Washington traded a second-round selection and a 2019 second-round selection to Indianapolis in exchange for a 2019 first-round selection.[trade 3]

Round 3

  • Chicago → Las Vegas (PD). See Round 1: Chicago → Las Vegas.[trade 1]
  • Pittsburgh → Denver (PD). Pittsburgh traded a third-round selection along with 2019 first- and second-round selections to Denver in exchange for Denver's 2019 first-round selection.[trade 3]

Round 4

  • Chicago → New England (PD). Chicago traded a fourth-round selection as well as 2019 third- and fifth-round selections to New England in exchange for New England's third- and sixth-round selections.[trade 3]
  • Tennessee → Miami (PD). Tennessee traded a fourth-round selection as well as a 2019 seventh-round selection to Miami in exchange for a 2019 sixth-round selection and quarterback Ryan Tannehill.[trade 5]

Round 5

  • L.A. Rams → Jacksonville (PD). The L.A. Rams traded their fifth-round selection as well as their 2019 third-round selection to Jacksonville in exchange for defensive end Dante Fowler.[trade 6]
  • Miami → Arizona (PD). Miami traded a 2020 fifth-round selection as well as a 2019 2nd round selection to Arizona in exchange for quarterback Josh Rosen.[trade 7]
  • New England → Philadelphia (PD). New England traded a fifth-round selection to Philadelphia in exchange for a seventh-round selection and defensive lineman Michael Bennett.[trade 8]

Round 6

  • Arizona → Cleveland (PD). Arizona traded a sixth-round selection to Cleveland in exchange for cornerback Jamar Taylor.[trade 9]
  • Dallas → Miami (PD). Dallas traded a sixth-round selection to Miami in exchange for defensive end Robert Quinn.[trade 10]
  • Denver → Washington (PD). Denver traded a conditional sixth-round selection as well as 2018 fourth-round and two fifth-round selections (109th, 142nd, and 163rd) to Washington in exchange for Washington's 2018 fourth- and fifth-round selections (113th and 149th) and safety Su'a Cravens. The trade is on the condition that Cravens appears in a playoff game for the Broncos.[trade 11]
  • Seattle → Jacksonville (PD). Seattle traded a 2020 sixth-round selection to Jacksonville in exchange for a 2019 seventh-round selection.[trade 3]
  • Washington → Denver (PD). Washington traded a sixth-round selection to Denver in exchange for a seventh-round selection and quarterback Case Keenum.[trade 12]
  • Kansas City → N.Y. Jets (PD). Kansas City traded a sixth-round selection to New York in exchange for linebacker Darron Lee.[trade 13]

Round 7

Unresolved

  • Philadelphia → Chicago (PD). Philadelphia traded a conditional fifth- or sixth-round selection to Chicago in exchange for running back Jordan Howard.[trade 21]

References

Trade references

  1. ^ a b c "trade: Bears give Mack record deal after trade". ESPN.co.uk. September 2, 2018. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  2. ^ teope, Herbie (April 23, 2019). "Seahawks agree to trade Frank Clark to Chiefs for draft picks". NFL.com. Retrieved April 23, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e "2019 NFL Draft trade tracker: Details of all the moves". NFL.com. April 25, 2019. Retrieved April 29, 2019.
  4. ^ teope, Herbie (March 12, 2019). "Chiefs trade pass-rusher Dee Ford to 49ers". NFL.com.
  5. ^ Wolfe, Cameron (March 15, 2019). "Dolphins trade Ryan Tannehill to Titans". ESPN.com. Retrieved March 18, 2019.
  6. ^ "Rams acquire Jags DE Dante Fowler for draft picks". ESPN.com. October 30, 2018. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  7. ^ teope, Herbie (April 26, 2019). "Cardinals trade QB Josh Rosen to Dolphins for picks". NFL.com. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  8. ^ McPherson, Chris (March 14, 2019). "Eagles acquire 2020 draft pick from New England for DE Michael Bennett". PhiladelphiaEagles.com.
  9. ^ Cabot, Mary Kay (May 19, 2018). "Browns' trade of Jamar Taylor to the Cardinals for 6th round pick in '20 is official". Cleveland.com. Retrieved May 21, 2018.
  10. ^ teope, Herbie (March 28, 2019). "Dallas Cowboys trade for Dolphins DE Robert Quinn". NFL.com.
  11. ^ "Broncos trade for Redskins safety Su'a Cravens". kdvr.com. March 28, 2018. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  12. ^ "Broncos Trade Case Keenum to Washington Redskins". DenverBroncos.com. March 13, 2019.
  13. ^ Gordon, Grant (May 15, 2019). "Gase's 1st move: Jets trade LB Darron Lee to Chiefs". NFL.com.
  14. ^ "Packers trade Ty Montgomery to Ravens for 2020 draft pick". ESPN.com. October 30, 2018. Retrieved October 30, 2018.
  15. ^ Knoblauch, Austin (August 6, 2018). "Browns trade Corey Coleman to Bills for draft pick". NFL.com. Retrieved August 6, 2018.
  16. ^ Sessler, Marc (August 23, 2018). "trade! Lions acquire LB Eli Harold from 49ers". NFL.com.
  17. ^ Florio, Mike (August 31, 2018). "Dolphins trade safety Jordan Lucas to the Chiefs". Pro Football Talk. NBC Sports.
  18. ^ "Saints acquire CB Eli Apple in trade with Giants". ESPN.com. October 23, 2018. Retrieved October 23, 2018.
  19. ^ Williams, Charean (March 11, 2019). "Bucs trade DeSean Jackson to Eagles". Pro Football Talk. NBC Sports.
  20. ^ https://www.detroitnews.com/story/sports/nfl/lions/2019/06/13/detroit-lions-trading-te-roberts-patriots/1442001001/
  21. ^ Bergman, Jeremy (March 28, 2019). "Eagles acquire Bears RB Jordan Howard in trade". NFL.com.

General references

  1. ^ "Finalists to host 2019, 2020 NFL Draft announced". NFL.com. National Football League. February 15, 2018.
  2. ^ "these three cities won't have to wait long to host the NFL draft". Yahoo! Sports. May 30, 2018.
  3. ^ "NFL draft headed to Las Vegas in 2020". NFL.com. Retrieved December 12, 2018.
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2019 Big Ten Conference football season

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2021 NFL Draft

The 2021 NFL Draft will be the 86th annual meeting of National Football League (NFL) franchises to select newly eligible players. The draft is expected to be held from April 29 to May 1, based on prior draft dates. It will be held in Cleveland, Ohio.

2023 NFL Draft

The 2023 NFL Draft will be the 88th annual meeting of National Football League (NFL) franchises to select newly eligible players. The draft is expected to be held from April 27 to 29, 2023 based on prior draft dates. It will be held in Kansas City, Missouri.

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Chase Young (American football)

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National Football League Draft

The National Football League Draft, also called the NFL Draft or the Player Selection Meeting, is an annual event which serves as the league's most common source of player recruitment. Each team is given a position in the drafting order in reverse order relative to its record in the previous year, which means that the last place team is positioned first. From this position, the team can either select a player or trade their position to another team for other draft positions, a player or players, or any combination thereof. The round is complete when each team has either selected a player or traded its position in the draft.

Certain aspects of the draft, including team positioning and the number of rounds in the draft, have been revised since its creation in 1936, but the fundamental method has remained the same. Currently the draft consists of seven rounds. The original rationale in creating the draft was to increase the competitive parity between the teams as the worst team would, ideally, be able to choose the best player available. In the early years of the draft, players were chosen based on hearsay, print media, or other rudimentary evidence of ability. In the 1940s, some franchises began employing full-time scouts. The ensuing success of these teams eventually forced the other franchises to also hire scouts.

Colloquially, the name of the draft each year takes on the form of the NFL season in which players picked could begin playing. For example, the 2010 NFL draft was for the 2010 NFL season. However, the NFL-defined name of the process has changed since its inception. The location of the draft has continually changed over the years to accommodate more fans, as the event has gained popularity. The draft's popularity now garners prime-time television coverage. In the league's early years, from the mid-1930s to the mid-1960s, the draft was held in various cities with NFL franchises until the league settled on New York City starting in 1965, where it remained for fifty years until 2015. The 2015 and 2016 NFL drafts were held in Chicago, while the 2017 version was held in Philadelphia and 2018 in Dallas. The 2019 NFL Draft was held in Nashville and the 2020 NFL Draft will be in Las Vegas. In recent years, the NFL draft has occurred in late April or early May.

Early era (1936–1959)
AFL and NFL era (1960–1966)
Common draft (1967–1969)
Modern era (1970–present)
Expansion drafts
Others
See also

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