2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA)

The European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football competition that determined the eight UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts France in the final tournament.[1][2][3]

Apart from France, 46 of the remaining 54 UEFA member national teams entered the qualifying competition,[4] with Andorra making their World Cup debut and Kosovo making their competitive debut.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification (UEFA)
Tournament details
Dates6 April 2017 – 13 November 2018
Teams46 (from 1 confederation)
Tournament statistics
Matches played169
Goals scored575 (3.4 per match)
Top scorer(s)Belgium Janice Cayman (10 goals)

Format

The qualifying competition consists of three rounds:[5]

  • Preliminary round: The 16 lowest-ranked teams are drawn into four groups of four teams. Each group is played in single round-robin format at one of the teams which are pre-selected as hosts. The four group winners and the best runners-up (not counting results against the fourth-placed team) advance to the qualifying group stage.
  • Qualifying group stage: The 35 teams (30 highest-ranked teams and five preliminary round qualifiers) are drawn into seven groups of five teams. Each group is played in home-and-away round-robin format. The seven group winners qualify directly for the final tournament, while the four best runners-up (not counting results against the fifth-placed team) advance to the play-offs.
  • Play-offs: The four teams play two knockout rounds of home-and-away two-legged matches to determine the last qualified team from UEFA.

Tiebreakers

In the preliminary round and qualifying group stage, teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Articles 13.01, 13.02, and 15.01):[5]

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. (Qualifying group stage only) Away goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  5. If more than two teams are tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams are still tied, all head-to-head criteria above are reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  6. Goal difference in all group matches;
  7. Goals scored in all group matches;
  8. (Qualifying group stage only) Away goals scored in all group matches;
  9. (Preliminary round only) Penalty shoot-out if only two teams have the same number of points, and they met in the last round of the group and are tied after applying all criteria above (not used if more than two teams have the same number of points, or if their rankings are not relevant for qualification for the next stage);
  10. Disciplinary points (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  11. UEFA coefficient for the preliminary round or qualifying group stage draw.

To determine the best runner-up from the preliminary round and the four best runners-up from the qualifying group stage, the results against the teams in last place (fourth place in preliminary round and fifth place in qualifying group stage) are discarded. The following criteria are applied (Regulations Articles 13.03 and 15.02):[5]

  1. Points;
  2. Goal difference;
  3. Goals scored;
  4. (Qualifying group stage only) Away goals scored;
  5. Disciplinary points;
  6. UEFA coefficient for the preliminary round or qualifying group stage draw.

In the play-offs, the team that scores more goals on aggregate over the two legs qualifies for the final tournament. If the aggregate score is level, the away goals rule is applied, i.e., the team that scores more goals away from home over the two legs advances. If away goals are also equal, extra time is played. The away goals rule is again applied after extra time, i.e., if there are goals scored during extra time and the aggregate score is still level, the visiting team advances by virtue of more away goals scored. If no goals are scored during extra time, the tie is decided by penalty shoot-out (Regulations Article 17.01).[5]

Schedule

The qualifying matches are played on dates that fall within the FIFA Women's International Match Calendar.[6][7][8]

Stage FIFA International Dates
Preliminary round 6–11 April 2017
Qualifying group stage 11–19 September 2017
16–24 October 2017
20–28 November 2017
15–23 January 2018
26 February – 6 March 2018
2–10 April 2018
4–12 June 2018
27 August – 4 September 2018
Play-offs 1–9 October 2018
5–13 November 2018

Entrants

The teams were ranked according to their coefficient ranking, calculated based on the following:[9][10]

The 30 highest-ranked teams entered the qualifying group stage, while the 16 lowest-ranked teams entered the preliminary round. The coefficient ranking was also used for seeding in the preliminary round and qualifying group stage draws.

Final tournament hosts
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 France 42,355 2
Teams entering qualifying group stage
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Germany 42,957 1
 England 39,880 3
 Norway 39,161 4
 Sweden 38,036 5
 Spain 37,655 6
  Switzerland 36,629 7
 Italy 34,775 8
 Netherlands 34,642 9
 Iceland 34,141 10
 Scotland 33,632 11
 Denmark 32,915 12
 Austria 31,882 13
 Belgium 31,213 14
 Russia 30,367 15
 Finland 29,815 16
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Ukraine 28,579 17
 Wales 25,807 18
 Romania 25,602 19
 Poland 24,832 20
 Czech Republic 23,874 21
 Republic of Ireland 23,669 22
 Portugal 22,860 23
 Serbia 21,579 24
 Hungary 20,362 25
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 19,546 26
 Belarus 19,434 27
 Slovakia 18,104 28
 Slovenia 17,224 29
 Northern Ireland 17,051 30
 Croatia 16,266 31
Teams entering preliminary round
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Turkey 15,656 32
 Israel 14,641 33
 Greece 13,961 34
 Kazakhstan 13,350 35
 Estonia 11,151 36
 Albania 9,121 37
 Faroe Islands 8,020 38
 Moldova 7,910 39
 Malta 7,208 42
 Montenegro 7,191 44
 Georgia 6,316 45
 Lithuania 4,818 46
 Latvia 4,584 47
 Luxembourg 4,109 48
 Andorra 1,793 49
 Kosovo
Notes
  • Teams marked in bold qualified for the World Cup.
Did not enter
Team Coeff Rank
 Bulgaria 7,817 40
 North Macedonia 7,768 41
 Armenia 7,194 43
 Azerbaijan
 Cyprus
 Gibraltar
 Liechtenstein
 San Marino

Preliminary round

Draw

The draw for the preliminary round was held on 19 January 2017, 13:30 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.[11][12]

The 16 teams were allocated into four seeding positions according to their coefficient ranking. They were drawn into four groups of four containing one team from each of the four seeding positions. First, the four teams which were pre-selected as hosts were drawn from their own designated pot and allocated to their respective group as per their seeding positions. Next, the remaining 12 teams were drawn from their respective pot which were allocated according to their seeding positions.[13]

Seeding position 1
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Turkey 15,656 32
 Israel 14,641 33
 Greece 13,961 34
 Kazakhstan 13,350 35
Seeding position 2
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Estonia 11,151 36
 Albania (H) 9,121 37
 Faroe Islands (H) 8,020 38
 Moldova 7,910 39
Seeding position 3
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Malta 7,208 42
 Montenegro 7,191 44
 Georgia (H) 6,316 45
 Lithuania (H) 4,818 46
Seeding position 4
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Latvia 4,584 47
 Luxembourg 4,109 48
 Andorra 1,793 49
 Kosovo
Notes
  • Teams which were pre-selected as preliminary round hosts were denoted by (H).
  • Teams marked in bold advanced from preliminary round to qualifying group stage.

Groups

Group 1

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Kazakhstan 3 2 1 0 4 2 +2 7 Qualifying group stage 2–2 1–0
2  Latvia 3 1 2 0 7 3 +4 5 1–1
3  Georgia (H) 3 1 1 1 3 3 0 4 2–1
4  Estonia 3 0 0 3 1 7 −6 0 0–1 0–4

Group 2

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Albania (H) 3 2 1 0 5 3 +2 7 Qualifying group stage 2–1 3–2
2  Greece 3 2 0 1 8 2 +6 6 1–0 6–0
3  Malta 3 1 1 1 3 2 +1 4 0–0
4  Kosovo 3 0 0 3 3 12 −9 0 1–3

Group 3

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Israel 3 2 1 0 9 0 +9 7 Qualifying group stage 2–0 7–0
2  Moldova 3 2 1 0 6 0 +6 7 0–0 4–0
3  Lithuania (H) 3 1 0 2 2 4 −2 3 0–2
4  Andorra 3 0 0 3 0 13 −13 0 0–2

Group 4

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Faroe Islands (H) 3 3 0 0 9 3 +6 9 Qualifying group stage 2–1 5–1
2  Turkey 3 2 0 1 13 3 +10 6 3–0 9–1
3  Montenegro 3 1 0 2 8 6 +2 3 1–2
4  Luxembourg 3 0 0 3 3 21 −18 0 1–7

Ranking of second-placed teams

To determine the best second-placed teams from the preliminary round which advance to the qualifying group stage, only the results of the second-placed teams against the first and third-placed teams in their group are taken into account, while results against the fourth-placed team are not included. As a result, two matches played by each second-placed team are counted for the purposes of determining the ranking.

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 3  Moldova 2 1 1 0 2 0 +2 4 Qualifying group stage
2 4  Turkey 2 1 0 1 4 2 +2 3
3 2  Greece 2 1 0 1 2 2 0 3
4 1  Latvia 2 0 2 0 3 3 0 2

Qualifying group stage

Draw

The draw for the qualifying group stage was held on 25 April 2017, 13:30 CEST (UTC+2), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.[14][15]

The 35 teams were allocated into five seeding pots according to their coefficient ranking, with the five preliminary round qualifiers placed in Pot E. They were drawn into seven groups of five containing one team from each of the five seeding pots. For political reasons, Russia and Ukraine would not be drawn in the same group.[16]

Pot A
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Germany 42,957 1
 England 39,880 3
 Norway 39,161 4
 Sweden 38,036 5
 Spain 37,655 6
  Switzerland 36,629 7
 Italy 34,775 8
Pot B
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Netherlands 34,642 9
 Iceland 34,141 10
 Scotland 33,632 11
 Denmark 32,915 12
 Austria 31,882 13
 Belgium 31,213 14
 Russia 30,367 15
Pot C
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Finland 29,815 16
 Ukraine 28,579 17
 Wales 25,807 18
 Romania 25,602 19
 Poland 24,832 20
 Czech Republic 23,874 21
 Republic of Ireland 23,669 22
Pot D
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Portugal 22,860 23
 Serbia 21,579 24
 Hungary 20,362 25
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 19,546 26
 Belarus 19,434 27
 Slovakia 18,104 28
 Slovenia 17,224 29
Pot E
Team Coeff Rank[10]
 Northern Ireland 17,051 30
 Croatia 16,266 31
 Israel (P) 14,641 33
 Kazakhstan (P) 13,350 35
 Albania (P) 9,121 37
 Faroe Islands (P) 8,020 38
 Moldova (P) 7,910 39
Notes
  • Teams marked in bold qualified for the final tournament as group winners.
  • Teams marked in italics advanced to the play-offs as four best runners-up.
  • Teams which advanced from preliminary round to qualifying group stage were denoted by (P).

Groups

Group 1

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  England 8 7 1 0 29 1 +28 22 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 0–0 6–0 4–0 5–0
2  Wales 8 5 2 1 7 3 +4 17 0–3 3–0 1–0 1–0
3  Russia 8 4 1 3 16 13 +3 13 1–3 0–0 3–0 3–0
4  Bosnia and Herzegovina 8 1 0 7 3 19 −16 3[a] 0–2 0–1 1–6 0–2
5  Kazakhstan 8 1 0 7 2 21 −19 3[a] 0–6 0–1 0–3 0–2
  1. ^ a b Head-to-head results: Kazakhstan 0–2 Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bosnia and Herzegovina 0–2 Kazakhstan (tied on head-to-head results, ranked on total goal difference).

Group 2

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Scotland 8 7 0 1 19 7 +12 21 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2–1 3–0 5–0 2–1
2   Switzerland 8 6 1 1 21 5 +16 19 Play-offs 1–0 2–1 5–1 3–0
3  Poland 8 3 2 3 16 12 +4 11 2–3 0–0 1–1 4–1
4  Albania 8 1 1 6 6 22 −16 4 1–2 1–4 1–4 1–0
5  Belarus 8 1 0 7 5 21 −16 3 1–2 0–5 1–4 1–0

Group 3

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Norway 8 7 0 1 22 4 +18 21 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2–1 1–0 4–1 6–1
2  Netherlands 8 6 1 1 22 2 +20 19 Play-offs 1–0 0–0 7–0 1–0
3  Republic of Ireland 8 4 1 3 10 6 +4 13 0–2 0–2 4–0 2–1
4  Northern Ireland 8 1 0 7 4 27 −23 3[a] 0–3 0–5 0–2 0–1
5  Slovakia 8 1 0 7 4 23 −19 3[a] 0–4 0–5 0–2 1–3
  1. ^ a b Head-to-head results: Slovakia 1–3 Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland 0–1 Slovakia.

Group 4

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Sweden 8 7 0 1 22 2 +20 21 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 3–0[a] 3–0 5–0 4–0
2  Denmark 8 5 1 2 22 8 +14 16 Play-offs 0–1 1–0 5–1 1–1
3  Ukraine 8 4 1 3 9 10 −1 13 1–0 1–5 2–0 1–1
4  Hungary 8 1 1 6 8 26 −18 4 1–4 1–6 0–1 2–2
5  Croatia 8 0 3 5 5 20 −15 3 0–2 0–4 0–3 1–3
  1. ^ The Sweden v Denmark match was scheduled for 20 October 2017, but was cancelled because of a disagreement between the Danish team and their federation.[17] On 16 November it was announced that the result was awarded 3–0 to Sweden.[18]

Group 5

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Germany 8 7 0 1 38 3 +35 21 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2–3 4–0 6–0 11–0
2  Iceland 8 5 2 1 22 6 +16 17 0–2 1–1 2–0 8–0
3  Czech Republic 8 4 2 2 20 8 +12 14 0–1 1–1 2–0 4–1
4  Slovenia 8 2 0 6 9 20 −11 6 0–4 0–2 0–4 5–0
5  Faroe Islands 8 0 0 8 1 53 −52 0 0–8 0–5 0–8 0–4

Group 6

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Italy 8 7 0 1 19 4 +15 21 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2–1 3–0 3–0 5–0
2  Belgium 8 6 1 1 28 6 +22 19 Play-offs 2–1 1–1 3–2 12–0
3  Portugal 8 3 2 3 22 8 +14 11 0–1 0–1 5–1 8–0
4  Romania 8 1 2 5 7 15 −8 5 0–1 0–1 1–1 3–1
5  Moldova 8 0 1 7 2 45 −43 1 1–3 0–7 0–7 0–0

Group 7

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Spain 8 8 0 0 25 2 +23 24 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 4–0 5–1 3–0 2–0
2  Austria 8 5 1 2 19 7 +12 16 0–1 4–1 1–1 2–0
3  Finland 8 3 1 4 9 13 −4 10 0–2 0–2 1–0 4–0
4  Serbia 8 2 1 5 5 13 −8 7 1–2 0–4 0–2 2–0
5  Israel 8 0 1 7 0 23 −23 1 0–6 0–6 0–0 0–1

Ranking of second-placed teams

To determine the four best second-placed teams from the qualifying group stage which advance to the play-offs, only the results of the second-placed teams against the first, third and fourth-placed teams in their group are taken into account, while results against the fifth-placed team are not included. As a result, six matches played by each second-placed team are counted for the purposes of determining the ranking.

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 3  Netherlands 6 4 1 1 16 2 +14 13 Play-offs
2 2   Switzerland 6 4 1 1 13 5 +8 13
3 6  Belgium 6 4 1 1 9 6 +3 13
4 4  Denmark 6 4 0 2 17 7 +10 12
5 5  Iceland 6 3 2 1 9 6 +3 11
6 1  Wales 6 3 2 1 5 3 +2 11
7 7  Austria 6 3 1 2 11 7 +4 10

Play-offs

Draw

The draw for the play-offs was held on 7 September 2018, 14:00 CEST (UTC+2), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.[19] The four teams were drawn into two knockout rounds (semi-finals and final) of home-and-away two-legged format.

For the semi-finals, two teams were seeded and two teams were unseeded, based on their latest coefficient ranking after the completion of the qualifying group stage, calculated based on the following:[20]

Seeded
Team Coeff Rank
 Netherlands 39,430 4
  Switzerland 37,031 6
Unseeded
Team Coeff Rank
 Denmark 34,185 11
 Belgium 32,738 13

For each semi-final, a seeded team was drawn against an unseeded team, with the order of legs decided by draw. A draw was also held for the final between the two winners of the semi-finals to decide the order of legs.

Matches

Play-off semi-finals

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Netherlands  4–1  Denmark 2–0 2–1
Belgium  3–3 (a)   Switzerland 2–2 1–1

Play-off final

The winner Netherlands qualifies for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Team 1 Agg. Team 2 1st leg 2nd leg
Netherlands  4–1   Switzerland 3–0 1–1

Qualified teams

The following nine teams from UEFA qualified for the final tournament, including France which qualified as hosts.[21]

Team Qualified as Qualified on Previous appearances in FIFA Women's World Cup1
 France Hosts 19 March 2015[1] 3 (2003, 2011, 2015)
 England Group 1 winners 31 August 2018[22] 4 (1995, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 Scotland Group 2 winners 4 September 2018[23] 0 (debut)
 Norway Group 3 winners 4 September 2018[23] 7 (1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 Sweden Group 4 winners 4 September 2018[23] 7 (1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 Germany Group 5 winners 4 September 2018[23] 7 (1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 Italy Group 6 winners 8 June 2018[24] 2 (1991, 1999)
 Spain Group 7 winners 8 June 2018[24] 1 (2015)
 Netherlands Play-off winners 13 November 2018[25] 1 (2015)
1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

Top goalscorers

There were 575 goals scored in 169 matches, for an average of 3.4 goals per match.

10 goals

7 goals

6 goals

Source: UEFA.com[26]

For full lists of goalscorers, see sections in each group:

References

  1. ^ a b "France to host the FIFA Women's World Cup in 2019". FIFA.com. 19 March 2015.
  2. ^ "France to stage 2019 Women's World Cup". UEFA.com. 19 March 2015.
  3. ^ "Circular #1565 – FIFA women's tournaments 2018–2019" (PDF). FIFA.com. 11 November 2016.
  4. ^ "2019 Women's World Cup qualifying entries". UEFA.com. 9 January 2017.
  5. ^ a b c d "Regulations of the UEFA European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2017–19" (PDF). UEFA.
  6. ^ "2016/17 UEFA Women's calendar" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  7. ^ "2017/18 UEFA Women's calendar" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  8. ^ "2018/19 UEFA Women's calendar" (PDF). UEFA.com. UEFA.
  9. ^ "Coefficient Ranking of the Teams Participating in the Qualifying Competition" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "UEFA Women's National Team Coefficient Ranking for FIFA Women's World Cup qualifying" (PDF). UEFA.
  11. ^ "Women's World Cup preliminary round draw". UEFA.com. Retrieved 19 January 2017.
  12. ^ "Women's World Cup preliminary round draw". UEFA.com. 19 January 2017.
  13. ^ "World Cup preliminary round draw live on Thursday". UEFA.com. 16 January 2017.
  14. ^ "Women's World Cup qualifying group stage draw". UEFA.com. Retrieved 25 April 2017.
  15. ^ "Women's World Cup qualifying group stage draw". UEFA.com. 25 April 2017.
  16. ^ "World Cup qualifying group stage draw seedings". UEFA.com. 12 April 2017.
  17. ^ "Spillernes afbud fører til aflysning af VM-kvalkamp". dbu.dk. 20 October 2017.
  18. ^ "UEFA-beslut i Danmarksfrågan". svenskfotboll.se (in Swedish). Swedish Football Association. 16 November 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2017.
  19. ^ "Women's World Cup play-off draw". UEFA.com.
  20. ^ "Women's national team coefficients: September 2018" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 5 September 2018. Retrieved 5 September 2018.
  21. ^ "2019 FIFA Women's World Cup finals: France". UEFA.com.
  22. ^ "England book ticket to France 2019". FIFA.com. 31 August 2018.
  23. ^ a b c d "European quartet secure France 2019 berths". FIFA.com. 4 September 2018.
  24. ^ a b "Italy and Spain qualify for France 2019". FIFA.com. 8 June 2018.
  25. ^ "Dutch claim last European ticket for France 2019". FIFA.com. 13 November 2018.
  26. ^ "Statistics — Qualifying phase — Player statistics — Goals". UEFA.com. Retrieved 13 November 2018.

External links

2017–18 in Italian football

The 2017–18 season was the 116th season of competitive football in Italy.

2017–18 in Spanish football

The 2017–18 season was the 116th season of competitive association football in Spain.

2018 in Norwegian football

The 2018 season was the 113th season of competitive football in Norway.

The season began in March, and ended in December with the 2018 Norwegian Football Cup Final.

2018–19 in Italian football

The 2018–19 season was the 117th season of competitive football in Italy.

2018–19 in Spanish football

The 2018–19 season was the 117th season of competitive association football in Spain.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 1

UEFA Group 1 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: England, Russia, Wales, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Kazakhstan (which advanced from the preliminary round). The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 17 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 2

UEFA Group 2 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Switzerland, Scotland, Poland, Belarus, and Albania (which advanced from the preliminary round). The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 15 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 3

UEFA Group 3 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Norway, the Netherlands, the Republic of Ireland, Slovakia, and Northern Ireland. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 15 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 4

UEFA Group 4 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Sweden, Denmark, Ukraine, Hungary, and Croatia. The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 15 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 5

UEFA Group 5 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Germany, Iceland, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, and the Faroe Islands (which advanced from the preliminary round). The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 14 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 6

UEFA Group 6 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Italy, Belgium, Romania, Portugal, and Moldova (which advanced from the preliminary round). The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 15 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 7

UEFA Group 7 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Spain, Austria, Finland, Serbia, and Israel (which advanced from the preliminary round). The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 19 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team).

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA play-offs

The UEFA play-offs of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition involve the four runners-up with the best records among all seven groups in the qualifying group stage.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA preliminary round

The preliminary round of the European qualifying for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup consisted of the 16 lowest-ranked teams among the 46 entrants.

The 16 teams were drawn into four groups of four teams. Each group was played in single round-robin format, where one of the teams was pre-selected as hosts, between 6 and 11 April 2017. The four group winners and the best runner-up (not counting results against the fourth-placed team) advanced to the qualifying group stage to join the 30 direct entrants.Kazakhstan, Albania, Israel and the Faroe Islands advanced as group winners, and Moldova advanced as the best runner-up.

Betül Nur Yılmaz

Betül Nur Yılmaz is a Turkish female football referee and school teacher. She is a FIFA listed woman assistant referee.Yılmaz started her officiating career as an assistant referee in the Amateur league for boys in 2009. She served at this position in almost all amateur league. From 2010 on, she takes the assistant referee role in Women's Third and First League matches. On 25 September 2012, she debuted in a match of U15 boys teams as referee.Yılmaz was named FIFA listed woman rassistant eferee for 2016, and continued to bear this title in 2017. She debuted in this role at the 2017–18 UEFA Women's Champions League qualifying round match between ŽNK Osijek and ŽFK Istatov on 22 August 2017. She assisted her countrywoman referee Melis Özçiğdem at the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 4 match between Sweden and Hungary on 24 October 2017, and Group 7 match between Finland and Israel on 26 November 2017.Yılmaz kept her FIFA-badge for 2018. She served as assistant referee alongside Turkish Melis Özçiğdem at the 2018–19 UEFA Women's Champions League - Round of 32 match between AFC Ajax and AC Sparta Praha on 12 September 2018. She was assistant to her countrywoman referee Neslihan Muratdağı in three matches at the 2019 UEFA Women's Under-17 Championship qualification – Group 8 matches in September 2018.

Euroborg

The Hitachi Capital Mobility Stadion, or Hitachi Stadion for short, is the stadium of football club FC Groningen, with a capacity of 22,329 seats and located to the south-east of Groningen. The stadium site houses a casino, movie theater, school, supermarket, and a fitness centre. A temporary railway station at the Euroborg Stadium opened in late 2007, and a permanent one opened in 2013. The stadium's seats are completely clad in the club's colors of green and white, with 1,000 seats available for supporters of the away team.

Eyðvør Klakstein

Eyðvør Klakstein (born 5 September 1995) is a Faroese football midfielder who currently plays for Mislata CF. From August 2015 until May 2016 she was playing for CD Marino in the second best football division in Spain.

Milja Simonsen

Milja Reinert Simonsen (born 11 January 1997) is a Faroese football forward who currently plays for Havnar Bóltfelag.

Serbia women's national football team

The Serbia women's national football team represents Serbia in international women's football competitions and is controlled by the Football Association of Serbia.

It was previously known as the Yugoslavia women's national football team from 15 January 1992 until 4 February 2003, and then as the Serbia and Montenegro women's national football team until 3 June 2006 when Serbia declared independence as the successor state to the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro. It was officially renamed the Serbia women's national football team on 28 June 2006, while the Montenegro women's national football team was created to represent the new state of Montenegro.Both FIFA and UEFA consider the Serbia national team the direct descendant of the Serbia and Montenegro national team.Between 1921 and 1992, this team did not exist as we know it today, since Serbia was part of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (1918–1943) and later on, the Socialist Republic of Yugoslavia (1945–1991). The Serbia national team existed from 1919 to 1921, and then ceased to exist following the creation of the first Kingdom of Yugoslavia. The new national team formed in 1992 was considered the direct descendant of the Yugoslavia national team, as it kept Yugoslavia's former status, which was not the case for any other country resulting from the breakup of Yugoslavia.

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