2019 Algarve Cup

The 2019 Algarve Cup was the 26th edition of the Algarve Cup, an invitational women's football tournament held annually in Portugal. It took place from 27 February to 6 March.

Norway defeated Poland 3–0 in the final to win their fifth title.[1]

2019 Algarve Cup
Tournament details
Host country Portugal
Dates27 February – 6 March
Teams12 (from 3 confederations)
Final positions
Champions Norway (5th title)
Runners-up Poland
Third place Canada
Fourth place Sweden
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored42 (2.63 per match)
Top scorer(s)Spain Jennifer Hermoso
Sweden Mimmi Larsson
(3 goals)

Format

The twelve invited teams were split into four groups to play a round-robin tournament.

Points awarded in the group stage followed the standard formula of three points for a win, one point for a draw and zero points for a loss. In the case of two teams being tied on the same number of points in a group, their head-to-head result determine the higher place.

Teams

Team FIFA Rankings[2]
(December 2018)
 Canada
5
 Netherlands
7
 Sweden
9
 Spain
12
 Norway
13
 China PR
15
 Denmark
17
  Switzerland
18
 Scotland
20
 Iceland
22
 Portugal
32
 Poland
34

Group stage

The groups were announced in mid-January 2019

All times are local (UTC±0).

Tie-breaking criteria

For the group stage of this tournament, where two or more teams in a group tied on an equal number of points, the finishing positions were determined by the following tie-breaking criteria in the following order:

  1. number of points obtained in the matches among the teams in question
  2. goal difference in all the group matches
  3. number of goals scored in all the group matches
  4. fair-play ranking in all the group matches
  5. FIFA ranking

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Canada 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 4
2  Scotland 2 1 0 1 4 2 +2 3
3  Iceland 2 0 1 1 1 4 −3 1
Canada 0–0 Iceland
Report
Scotland 0–1 Canada
Report Sinclair Goal 81' (pen.)
Iceland 1–4 Scotland
Gunnarsdóttir Goal 57' Report

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Poland 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 6
2  Spain 2 1 0 1 2 3 −1 3
3  Netherlands 2 0 0 2 0 3 −3 0
Spain 2–0 Netherlands
Hermoso Goal 22'64' Report
Poland 3–0 Spain
Report
Netherlands 0–1 Poland
Report Winczo Goal 42'

Group C

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Norway 2 2 0 0 5 2 +3 6
2  Denmark 2 1 0 1 2 2 0 3
3  China PR 2 0 0 2 1 4 −3 0
Norway 2–1 Denmark
Report
China PR 1–3 Norway
Wang Goal 90' Report
Denmark 1–0 China PR
Harder Goal 60' (pen.)

Group D

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  Sweden 2 1 0 1 5 3 +2 3
2   Switzerland 2 1 0 1 4 5 −1 3
3  Portugal (H) 2 1 0 1 3 4 −1 3
Sweden 4–1  Switzerland
Report
Portugal 2–1 Sweden
Report Björn Goal 68'
Switzerland  3–1 Portugal
Report Norton Goal 27'

Ranking of teams for placement matches

The ranking of the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd placed teams in each group to determine the placement matches:

  • 1st placed teams
Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 B  Poland 2 2 0 0 4 0 +4 6 Final
2 C  Norway 2 2 0 0 5 2 +3 6
3 A  Canada 2 1 1 0 1 0 +1 4 Third-place match
4 D  Sweden 2 1 0 1 5 3 +2 3
  • 2nd placed teams
Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 A  Scotland 2 1 0 1 4 2 +2 3 Fifth-place match
2 C  Denmark 2 1 0 1 2 2 0 3
3 D   Switzerland 2 1 0 1 4 5 −1 3 Seventh-place match
4 B  Spain 2 1 0 1 2 3 −1 3
  • 3rd placed teams
Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 D  Portugal 2 1 0 1 3 4 −1 3 Ninth-place match
2 A  Iceland 2 0 1 1 1 4 −3 1
3 C  China PR 2 0 0 2 1 4 −3 0 Eleventh-place match
4 B  Netherlands 2 0 0 2 0 3 −3 0

Placement matches

Eleventh place

China PR 1–1 Netherlands
Yao Goal 50' Report Miedema Goal 45'
Penalties
2–4

Ninth place

Portugal 1–4 Iceland
Mendes Goal 88' Report

Seventh place

Switzerland  0–2 Spain
Report

Fifth place

Scotland 1–0 Denmark
Ross Goal 34' Report

Third place

Canada 0–0 Sweden
Report
Penalties
6–5

Final

Poland 0–3 Norway
Report

Final standings

Rank Team[3]
1st, gold medalist(s)  Norway
2nd, silver medalist(s)  Poland
3rd, bronze medalist(s)  Canada
4  Sweden
5  Scotland
6  Denmark
7  Spain
8   Switzerland
9  Iceland
10  Portugal
11  Netherlands
12  China PR

Goalscorers

There have been 42 goals scored in 16 matches, for an average of 2.63 goals per match.

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

References

  1. ^ "Noruega conquista Algarve Cup 2019". fpf.pt. Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  2. ^ FIFA.com. "The FIFA Women's World Ranking – Ranking Table". fifa.com. Retrieved 22 December 2018.
  3. ^ Final ranking

External links

2018–19 in Scottish football

The 2018–19 season is the 122nd season of competitive football in Scotland.

2019 in Canadian soccer

The 2019 season is the 143rd season of competitive soccer in Canada.

2019 in Swedish football

The 2019 season is the 122nd season of competitive football in Sweden. The men's team will be qualifying for the UEFA Euro 2020, and the women's team will participate in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Algarve Cup

The Algarve Cup is an invitational tournament for national teams in women's association football hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious and longest-running women's international football events and has been nicknamed the "Mini FIFA Women's World Cup".The most successful teams have been the United States, with ten titles, followed by Norway and Sweden, with four. Norway's titles all came in the early years of the tournament, while the USA has won all its titles since 2000, including nine in thirteen years since 2003. Germany has won three times, and China has won twice. The USA, Norway and Germany are the only nations to have won both the FIFA Women's World Cup and the Algarve Cup.

The Algarve Cup, as an annual event featuring most of the world's top women's football teams, has no parallel in the men's game, given that there are fewer professional women's leagues and thus fewer scheduling conflicts. It is played in late February or early March, at the same time as the Cyprus Cup and the SheBelieves Cup. Since 2016 the SheBelieves Cup has attracted some of the top ranked teams, and thus shifted attention from the Algarve Cup. The SheBelieves Cup is now considered to be the top international tournament outside of FIFA or continental tournaments.

Canada women's national soccer team results

The following is a list of all results of the Canada women's national soccer team.

Win

Draw

Loss

Scorers list only the Canadian scorers.

China women's national football team

The China women's national football team (Chinese: 中国国家女子足球队; pinyin: Zhōngguó Guójiā Nǚzǐ Zúqiú Duì), recognized as China PR by FIFA, is governed by the Chinese Football Association. The team is colloquially referred to as "Zhōngguó Nǚzú" (Chinese: 中国女足, short for Chinese: 中国国家女子足球队; pinyin: Zhōngguó Guójiā Nǚzĭ Zúqiú Duì; literally: 'Chinese national women's football team').

Erin Cuthbert

Erin Jacqueline Cuthbert (born 19 July 1998) is a Scottish footballer who plays for Chelsea in the FA WSL. She is a member of the Scotland national team.

Guro Reiten

Guro Reiten (born 26 July 1994) is a Norwegian professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for Chelsea and the Norway national team.

Julia Karlernäs

Julia Karlernäs (also spelled Karlenäs; born 6 October 1993) is a Swedish football midfielder who plays for Piteå IF and the Sweden national team.

Lisa-Marie Karlseng Utland

Lisa-Marie Karlseng Utland (born 19 September 1992) is a Norwegian footballer who plays for FC Rosengård in the Swedish Damallsvenskan and for the Norway national team.

Lizzie Arnot

Elizabeth Jane "Lizzie" Arnot (born 1 March 1996) is a Scottish professional footballer who plays as a forward for FA WSL club Manchester United and the Scotland national team.

She has previously played for Hibernian.

Netherlands women's national football team

The Netherlands women's national football team (Dutch: Nederlands vrouwenvoetbalelftal) is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

In 1971, the team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France. They have played at the final tournament of the 2009, 2013, and 2017 UEFA Women's Championship and were champions in 2017. They have played at the final tournament of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time, and reached thirteenth place. They have also played at the final tournament in the 2019 edition, losing 2-0 the final against the United States.

The nicknames for the team are Oranje (Orange) and Leeuwinnen (Lionesses). Sarina Wiegman has been head coach since January 2017. As of July 2019, the team is ranked number 3 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Norway women's national football team

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Scotland women's national football team

The Scotland women's national football team represents Scotland in international women's football competitions. Since 1998, the team has been governed by the Scottish Football Association (SFA). Scotland qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, and qualified for their first UEFA Women's Euro in 2017. As of July 2019, the team was 22nd in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Scotland women's national football team 2010–19 results

This article lists the results and fixtures for the Scotland women's national football team from 2010 to 2019.

Stine Hovland

Stine Hovland (born 31 January 1991) is a Norwegian football defender, who plays for Sandviken and the Norway national team. A relatively late bloomer, Hovland did not play in the Norwegian Toppserien until she was 24 years old and she made her national team debut at 27 years old.

Sweden women's national football team

The Sweden women's national football team (Swedish: svenska damfotbollslandslaget) represents Sweden in international women's football competition and is controlled by the Swedish Football Association. The national team has won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers (1987, 1995, 2001). The team has participated in six Olympic Games, eight World Cups, as well as ten European Championships. Sweden won bronze medals at the World Cups in 1991, 2011 and 2019.

The 2003 World Cup-final was the second most watched event in Sweden that year. Lotta Schelin is the top goalscorer in the history of Sweden with 85 goals. Schelin surpassed Hanna Ljungberg's 72-goal record against Germany on 29 October 2014. The player with the most caps is Therese Sjögran, with 214. The team was coached by Thomas Dennerby from 2005 to 2012, and Pia Sundhage from 2012 to 2017. The head coach is Peter Gerhardsson.

After winning the two qualifying matches against Denmark for the Beijing 2008 Olympics, the Swedish Olympic Committee approved of record increases in investments for the women's team. The new budget granted over a million SEK (about US$150,000) for the team and 150,000 SEK (about US$25,000) per player for developing physical fitness. The new grants are almost a 100% increase of the 2005 and 2006 season funds.The developments and conditions of the Sweden women's national football team can be seen in the Sveriges Television documentary television series The Other Sport from 2013.

Switzerland women's national football team

The Switzerland women's national football team represents Switzerland in international women's football. The team played its first match in 1972.

Switzerland qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup in Canada by winning their qualifying group. It was the first time that Switzerland participated in a women's World Cup, and the first time both the men's team and women's team qualified for a World Cup simultaneously.At the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, Switzerland was drawn into Group C with Japan, Cameroon and Ecuador. They secured a 10–1 victory over Ecuador, but lost 1–0 to Japan and 2–1 to Cameroon. Switzerland finished third in their group, but they were one of the top four third place finishers and advanced to the knockout round. In the Round of 16, Switzerland lost 1–0 to the hosts, Team Canada and were eliminated.Switzerland qualified for the European Championship for the first time in 2017. They were placed in Group C alongside France, Austria and Iceland. They lost to Austria 1–0, but then rebounded to beat Iceland 2–1. Switzerland went into their final group match against France needing a win in order to advance to the knockout stage. Switzerland led for much of the match after Ana-Maria Crnogorčević scored in the 19th minute, but Camille Abily scored the equalizer for France in the 76th minute, and the match ended in a 1–1 draw, as a result Switzerland finished third in their group and did not advance.

Switzerland has never qualified for the Olympic games.

Vivianne Miedema

Anna Margaretha Marina Astrid Miedema (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɑnaː mɑrɣaːˈreːtaː maːˈrinaː ˈʔɑstrɪt ˈmidəmaː]; born 15 July 1996), commonly known as Vivianne Miedema ([viviˈjɑnə]), is a Dutch professional footballer who plays as a forward for FA WSL club Arsenal and the Netherlands women's national football team. She has scored more goals at international level for the Netherlands than any other player, across both the women’s and men’s teams.

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