2018 Pro Bowl

The 2018 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2017 season, which was played at Camping World Stadium in Orlando, Florida on January 28, 2018. For the first time since 2008, the game started during afternoon hours instead of primetime hours for U.S. Mainland viewers with a 3:00 PM ET start. It marked the second year the game was played in Orlando. It was televised nationally by ESPN and simulcasted on ABC. The roster was announced on December 19 on NFL Network. The AFC team won the game 24–23, the second straight year the Pro Bowl was won by the AFC.

2018 Pro Bowl
2018 Pro Bowl
NFC AFC
23 24
Head coach:
Sean Payton
(New Orleans Saints)
Head coach:
Mike Tomlin
(Pittsburgh Steelers)
1234 Total
NFC 71303 23
AFC 30147 24
DateJanuary 28, 2018
StadiumCamping World Stadium, Orlando, Florida
Offensive MVPDelanie Walker (Tennessee Titans)
Defensive MVPVon Miller (Denver Broncos)
RefereeWalt Anderson[1]
Attendance51,019
Ceremonies
National anthemJordan Fisher
Coin tossDerrick Brooks
Warrick Dunn
Jason Taylor
LaDainian Tomlinson
Halftime showJordan Fisher
TV in the United States
NetworkESPN/ABC
AnnouncersSean McDonough, Matt Hasselbeck, Lisa Salters and Louis Riddick
Radio in the United States
NetworkWestwood One
AnnouncersKevin Kugler (play-by-play)
Steve Tasker (analyst)
Laura Okmin (sideline reporter)

Background

Host selection process

Under a three-year deal that began in 2017, the Pro Bowl will once again be hosted by Camping World Stadium in Orlando.[2]

Side events

The Pro Bowl Skills Challenge was held on January 25 at the Walt Disney World Resort and its ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex.

Game format

Rule changes

The game format was the same as for 2017, highlighted by:

  • Forty-four players were assigned to each team, up from 43 in 2016 (a regular game-day active roster has 46).
  • The two-minute warning that was given in the first and third quarters (in addition to the second and fourth quarters) in previous years was eliminated, and the ball did not change hands after the first and third quarters.
  • The coin toss determined which team was awarded possession first. There were no kickoffs; the ball was placed on the 25-yard line at the start of each half and after scoring plays.
  • Defenses were now permitted to play cover two and press coverage. Prior to 2014, only man coverage was allowed, except for goal line situations.
  • A 38-second/25-second play clock was used instead of the usual 40-second/25-second clock, and up from 35-second/25-second clock in 2016.
  • Replay reviews will be allowed; previously there was replay in the Pro Bowl only when new equipment tests were being conducted.
  • There are no intentional grounding rules.
  • Only defensive ends and tackles may rush on passing plays, but those must be on the same side of the ball. The defense is not permitted to blitz.
  • All blindside blocks and blocks below the waist are illegal.
  • A tight end and running back must be in every formation.
  • No more than two wide receivers on either side of the ball.
  • Deep middle safety must be aligned inside the hash marks.
  • Play is stopped the moment a defender wraps his arms around the ball carrier. (This rule only applies to the quarterback in the backfield during regular NFL play.)

Summary

Box score

AFC rosters

The following players were selected to represent the AFC:

Offense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Quarterback 12 Tom Brady, New England[d]   7 Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh
17 Philip Rivers, LA Chargers[b][3]
11 Alex Smith, Kansas City[a][3]
  4 Derek Carr, Oakland[a][4]
Running back 26 Le'Veon Bell, Pittsburgh 25 LeSean McCoy, Buffalo
27 Kareem Hunt, Kansas City
Fullback 46 James Develin, New England[d] 45 Roosevelt Nix, Pittsburgh[a][5]
Wide receiver 10 DeAndre Hopkins, Houston[b][6]
84 Antonio Brown, Pittsburgh
13 Keenan Allen, LA Chargers
18 A. J. Green, Cincinnati[b][7]
13 TY Hilton, Indianapolis[a][7]
14 Jarvis Landry, Miami[a][6]
Tight end 87 Travis Kelce, Kansas City[b][8] 87 Rob Gronkowski, New England[d] 82 Delanie Walker, Tennessee[a][8]
84 Jack Doyle, Indianapolis[a][9]
Offensive tackle 77 Taylor Lewan, Tennessee
78 Alejandro Villanueva, Pittsburgh
72 Donald Penn, Oakland[b][10] 76 Russell Okung, LA Chargers[a][10]
Offensive guard 66 David DeCastro, Pittsburgh
70 Kelechi Osemele, Oakland
64 Richie Incognito, Buffalo
Center 53 Maurkice Pouncey, Pittsburgh 61 Rodney Hudson, Oakland

Defense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Defensive end 93 Calais Campbell, Jacksonville[b][11]
99 Joey Bosa, LA Chargers[b][12]
52 Khalil Mack, Oakland[b][13] 54 Melvin Ingram, LA Chargers[a][12]
97 Cameron Heyward, Pittsburgh[a][13]
91 Yannick Ngakoue, Jacksonville[a][11]
Defensive tackle 97 Geno Atkins, Cincinnati
99 Jurrell Casey, Tennessee
97 Malik Jackson, Jacksonville
Outside linebacker 58 Von Miller, Denver
90 Jadeveon Clowney, Houston[b][11]
55 Terrell Suggs, Baltimore 50 Telvin Smith, Jacksonville[a][11]
Inside linebacker 57 C.J. Mosley, Baltimore 50 Ryan Shazier, Pittsburgh[b][14] 53 Joe Schobert, Cleveland[a][14]
Cornerback 20 Jalen Ramsey, Jacksonville
21 A. J. Bouye, Jacksonville
21 Aqib Talib, Denver
26 Casey Hayward, LA Chargers
Free safety 32 Eric Weddle, Baltimore 31 Kevin Byard, Tennessee[a][15]
Strong safety 20 Reshad Jones, Miami 23 Micah Hyde, Buffalo[b][15]

Special teams

Position Starter Alternate(s)
Punter   6 Brett Kern, Tennessee
Placekicker   9 Chris Boswell, Pittsburgh
Return specialist 10 Tyreek Hill, Kansas City
Special teamer 18 Matthew Slater, New England[d] 41 Brynden Trawick, Tennessee[a][15]
Long snapper 46 Clark Harris, Cincinnati[16]

NFC rosters

The following players were selected to represent the NFC:

Offense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Quarterback 11 Carson Wentz, Philadelphia[b][d]   3 Russell Wilson, Seattle
  9 Drew Brees, New Orleans
16 Jared Goff, LA Rams[a][17]
Running back 30 Todd Gurley, LA Rams 22 Mark Ingram, New Orleans
41 Alvin Kamara, New Orleans
Fullback 44 Kyle Juszczyk, San Francisco
Wide receiver 11 Julio Jones, Atlanta[b][18]
19 Adam Thielen, Minnesota
11 Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona[b][19]
13 Michael Thomas, New Orleans
17 Davante Adams, Green Bay[a][18]
89 Doug Baldwin, Seattle[a][19]
Tight end 86 Zach Ertz, Philadelphia[d] 88 Jimmy Graham, Seattle[b][20] 82 Jason Witten, Dallas[a][21]
82 Kyle Rudolph, Minnesota[a][20]
Offensive tackle 71 Trent Williams, Washington[b][22]
77 Tyron Smith, Dallas[b][23]
65 Lane Johnson, Philadelphia[d] 77 Andrew Whitworth, LA Rams[a][22]
74 Joe Staley, San Francisco[a][23]
76 Duane Brown, Seattle[24]
Offensive guard 70 Zack Martin, Dallas[b][25]
79 Brandon Brooks, Philadelphia[d]
75 Brandon Scherff, Washington[b][26] 70 Trai Turner, Carolina[a][25]
76 T. J. Lang, Detroit[a][26]
67 Larry Warford, New Orleans[a][27]
Center 51 Alex Mack, Atlanta 72 Travis Frederick, Dallas

Defense

Position Starter(s) Reserve(s) Alternate(s)
Defensive end 90 DeMarcus Lawrence, Dallas
97 Everson Griffen, Minnesota[b][28]
94 Cameron Jordan, New Orleans 72 Michael Bennett, Seattle[a][28]
Defensive tackle 91 Fletcher Cox, Philadelphia[d]
99 Aaron Donald, LA Rams[b][29]
93 Gerald McCoy, Tampa Bay 76 Mike Daniels, Green Bay[a][29]
98 Linval Joseph, Minnesota[a][20]
Outside linebacker 55 Chandler Jones, Arizona
91 Ryan Kerrigan, Washington
55 Anthony Barr, Minnesota[b][30] 58 Thomas Davis Sr., Carolina[a][30]
Inside linebacker 59 Luke Kuechly, Carolina[b][31] 54 Bobby Wagner, Seattle[b][32] 45 Deion Jones, Atlanta[a][31]
58 Kwon Alexander, Tampa Bay[a][32]
Cornerback 21 Patrick Peterson, Arizona
29 Xavier Rhodes, Minnesota
23 Marshon Lattimore, New Orleans
23 Darius Slay, Detroit
Free safety 29 Earl Thomas, Seattle
Strong safety 21 Landon Collins, NY Giants[b][20] 27 Malcolm Jenkins, Philadelphia[d] 22 Keanu Neal, Atlanta[a][33]
22 Harrison Smith, Minnesota[a][20]

Special teams

Position Starter Alternate(s)
Punter   6 Johnny Hekker, LA Rams
Placekicker   4 Greg Zuerlein, LA Rams[b] 9 Graham Gano, Carolina[a][25]
Return specialist 10 Pharoh Cooper, LA Rams
Special teamer 36 Budda Baker, Arizona
Long snapper 44 Jake McQuaide, LA Rams[34]

Notes: Players must have accepted their invitations as alternates to be listed; those who declined are not considered Pro Bowlers.

bold player who participated in game
(C) signifies the player has been selected as a captain
a Replacement Player selection due to injury or vacancy
b Injured/suspended player; selected but did not participate
c Replacement starter; selected as reserve
d Selected but did not play because his team advanced to Super Bowl LII (see Pro Bowl "Player Selection" section)

Number of selections per team

American Football Conference
Team Selections
Pittsburgh Steelers 10
Jacksonville Jaguars 6
Los Angeles Chargers 6
Tennessee Titans 6
Oakland Raiders 5
New England Patriots 4
Kansas City Chiefs 4
Baltimore Ravens 3
Buffalo Bills 3
Cincinnati Bengals 3
Denver Broncos 2
Houston Texans 2
Indianapolis Colts 2
Miami Dolphins 2
Cleveland Browns 1
New York Jets 0
National Football Conference
Team Selections
Los Angeles Rams 8
Seattle Seahawks 7
Minnesota Vikings 7
New Orleans Saints 7
Philadelphia Eagles 6
Dallas Cowboys 5
Arizona Cardinals 4
Carolina Panthers 4
Atlanta Falcons 4
Washington Redskins 3
Green Bay Packers 2
Detroit Lions 2
San Francisco 49ers 2
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 2
New York Giants 1
Chicago Bears 0

Broadcasting

The 2018 Pro Bowl was televised nationally by ABC, ESPN, and ESPN Deportes. The simulcast marked the game's return to broadcast television, as well as its return to ABC for the first time since 2003.[35] To accommodate the return to broadcast television, the game moved from primetime to an afternoon start time to avoid interfering with ABC's Primetime Lineup.

References

  1. ^ Walt Anderson is the referee for the 2018 Pro Bowl
  2. ^ "NFL's pro bowl moves to Orlando". Chicago Tribune. Tronc. Retrieved 13 December 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Alex Smith added to AFC Pro Bowl roster". ProFootballTalk.NBCSports.com. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  4. ^ "Raiders QB Derek Carr Selected To Third Consecutive Pro Bowl". Raiders.com. January 22, 2018.
  5. ^ Varley, Teresa (January 22, 2018). "Nix is Pro Bowl bound". Steelers.com.
  6. ^ a b "Dolphins receiver Jarvis Landry named to Pro Bowl as alternate". Sun-Sentinel.com. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  7. ^ a b Walker, Andrew. "T.Y. Hilton Selected To Fourth Straight Pro Bowl". Colts.com. Archived from the original on 2018-01-10. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  8. ^ a b "Delanie Walker in, Travis Kelce out for Pro Bowl". Yahoo.com. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  9. ^ Walker, Andrew (January 21, 2018). "Jack Doyle Named To First-Career Pro Bowl". Colts.com.
  10. ^ a b Elwood, Hayley (January 22, 2018). "Russell Okung Named to 2018 Pro Bowl". Chargers.com.
  11. ^ a b c d "Ngakoue and Smith added to Pro Bowl roster". Jaguars.com. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  12. ^ a b "Chargers OLB Melvin Ingram named to 2018 NFL Pro Bowl". USAToday.com. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  13. ^ a b Varley, Teresa (January 16, 2018). "Heyward headed to the Pro Bowl". Steelers.com. Archived from the original on 2018-01-17. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  14. ^ a b "Joe Schobert added to AFC Pro Bowl team". ProFootballTalk.NBCSports.com. 2018-01-16. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  15. ^ a b c "Titans FS Kevin Byard, ST Brynden Trawick Named to Pro Bowl". TitansOnline.com. Retrieved January 21, 2018.
  16. ^ Williams, Charean (January 16, 2018). "Bengals long snapper Clark Harris selected for Pro Bowl". ProFootballTalk.NBCSports.com. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  17. ^ Simmons, Myles (January 22, 2018). "Jared Goff Named to 2018 Pro Bowl". TheRams.com.
  18. ^ a b Western, Evan (January 16, 2018). "Packers' Davante Adams added to 2018 Pro Bowl roster". SBNation.
  19. ^ a b Williams, Charean (January 4, 2018). "Doug Baldwin replaces Larry Fitzgerald on Pro Bowl roster". ProFootballTalk.NBCSports.com.
  20. ^ a b c d e "Linval Joseph, Kyle Rudolph, Harrison Smith Named to 2018 Pro Bowl". Vikings.com. January 22, 2018. Archived from the original on 2018-01-23. Retrieved 2018-01-23.
  21. ^ Eatman, Nick (January 22, 2018). "Witten Added to Pro Bowl Roster; Ties Franchise Record With 11 Appearances". DallasCowboys.com.
  22. ^ a b Alper, Josh (January 9, 2018). "Andrew Whitworth will go to the Pro Bowl". ProFootballTalk.NBCSports.com.
  23. ^ a b "T Joe Staley Named to 2018 Pro Bowl". 49ers.com. January 22, 2018.
  24. ^ Boyle, John (January 23, 2018). "Seahawks Left Tackle Duane Brown Named To Pro Bowl Roster". Seahawks.com.
  25. ^ a b c "Graham Gano, Trai Turner named to Pro Bowl roster". panthers.com. Retrieved January 10, 2018.
  26. ^ a b Twentyman, Tim (January 19, 2018). "T.J. Lang named to 2018 Pro Bowl". DetroitLions.com.
  27. ^ Alper, Josh (January 22, 2018). "Larry Warford will join Saints coaches at the Pro Bowl". ProFootballTalk.NBCSports.com.
  28. ^ a b Boyle, John (January 22, 2018). "Seahawks Defensive End Michael Bennett Named To 2018 Pro Bowl Roster". Seahawks.com.
  29. ^ a b "Packers DT Mike Daniels named to Pro Bowl". packers.com. Archived from the original on 2018-01-10. Retrieved January 9, 2018.
  30. ^ a b "Thomas Davis named to Pro Bowl roster". Panthers.com. January 22, 2018.
  31. ^ a b "Deion Jones added to Pro Bowl roster". nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  32. ^ a b "Kwon Alexander Headed to the Pro Bowl!". buccaneers.com. Retrieved January 16, 2018.
  33. ^ Conway, Kelsey (January 22, 2018). "Falcons' safety Keanu Neal selected to 2018 Pro Bowl roster". AtlantaFalcons.com.
  34. ^ Klein, Gary (2018-01-17). "Rams snapper Jake McQuaide named to Pro Bowl for second year in a row". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2018-01-17.
  35. ^ "NFL's Pro Bowl Back on ABC". Broadcasting & Cable. Retrieved 24 May 2017.

External links

2017 All-Pro Team

The 2017 All-Pro teams were named by the Associated Press (AP), Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2017 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2018 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book and also part of the language of the 2011 NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Any player selected to the first-team of any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro." The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers and broadcasters. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and will be released at a later date. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2017 Cleveland Browns season

The 2017 season was the Cleveland Browns' 69th as a professional sports franchise, their 65th season as a member of the National Football League, their second under head coach Hue Jackson and their second and final season under GM Sashi Brown.

The Browns failed to improve upon their 1–15 record from the previous season, losing all sixteen games in 2017 and continuing a losing streak dating to the final game of the previous season. They became the second team in NFL history to go 0–16 after the 2008 Detroit Lions. The Browns became the twelfth NFL team to have gone winless playing eight games or more and the fourth since the AFL-NFL merger in 1970.

In going 0–16, the Browns became the first franchise in NFL history to have multiple seasons with 15 or more losses and the first to start consecutive seasons with at least 14 losses. They were mathematically eliminated from the AFC North title contention in Week 11, extending an active NFL record drought of 25 consecutive seasons without a division title. They were then eliminated from playoff contention in Week 12, extending their franchise record playoff drought to 15 consecutive seasons. With the Buffalo Bills qualifying for the postseason for the first time since 1999, the Browns now have the longest postseason drought in the NFL and the second longest in the four major American sports leagues, only behind the Seattle Mariners of Major League Baseball.

The Browns finished 4th place in the AFC North for the seventh consecutive season in addition to finishing the season with a losing record for the tenth consecutive season, extending a franchise record. It was the first season in which the team lost every home game since 1999. The Browns also extended their road losing streak to 21 games and their losing streak within the division to 17 games, both date back to the 2015 season. A Week 13 loss moved the Browns to 1–27 in their first 28 games under Jackson, surpassing the 1976–77 Tampa Bay Buccaneers for the worst 28 game start (2–26) for a regime in NFL history. The Browns finished the 2017 season with a combined record of 1–31 over the previous two seasons, an NFL record for worst winning percentage over any two season span. After starting 2014 with a 6–3 record heading into Week 11, the Browns went 5–50 in the 55 games between that point and the end of this season.

On December 7, Brown was relieved of his duties as executive vice president. John Dorsey, formerly of the Kansas City Chiefs, was hired as general manager the same day. To further add to these failures, offensive tackle Joe Thomas missed the Pro Bowl for the first time in his career, as he tore his left triceps on October 22, ending his season. Before his injury, Thomas had not missed a single snap since joining the league in 2007, a total of 10,363 plays. He then decided to retire on March 14, 2018 following the season.

The season saw the Browns play in London for the first time in franchise history, where they lost to the Minnesota Vikings 33–16 on October 29.

2017 Minnesota Vikings season

The 2017 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 57th in the National Football League, and their fourth under head coach Mike Zimmer. With the team's home stadium, U.S. Bank Stadium, scheduled to host Super Bowl LII at the end of the season, the Vikings attempted to make history as the first team to play the Super Bowl on their home field; in recording their best regular season record since 1998, they clinched a first-round bye for the first time since 2009 and became the eighth team in the Super Bowl era to qualify for the playoffs in a season in which their stadium hosted the Super Bowl. They defeated the New Orleans Saints in the Divisional Round 29–24 on a walk-off play referred to as the "Minneapolis Miracle", but lost 38–7 to the eventual Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles in the NFC Championship Game.

Brandon Brooks (American football)

Brandon Brooks (born August 19, 1989) is an American football guard for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Miami (Ohio). A native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Brooks attended Riverside University High School. He was drafted in the third round (76th overall) by the Houston Texans after not being invited to the NFL Combine.

Budda Baker

Bishard "Budda" Baker (born January 10, 1996) is an American football safety for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Washington.

C. J. Mosley (linebacker)

Clint Mosley Jr. (born June 19, 1992) is an American football linebacker for the New York Jets of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Alabama, and was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft.

Darius Slay

Darius Demetrius Slay Jr. (born January 1, 1991) is an American football cornerback for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Lions in the second round of the 2013 NFL Draft and played college football at Mississippi State.

Harrison Butker

Harrison Butker (born July 14, 1995) is an American football kicker for the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). His nickname is Butt Kicker, which is a play on words of his last name and being a kicker.

Harrison Smith (American football)

Harrison Smith (born February 2, 1989) is an American football safety for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League. He was drafted in the first round, 29th overall of the 2012 NFL Draft. He played college football for Notre Dame.

In 2017, Smith was graded the best player in the NFL by Pro Football Focus. His season grade of 98.8 was also the highest among safeties in Pro Football Focus history. He was named to his third straight Pro Bowl on January 22, 2018 and was named first team All-Pro.

Kareem Hunt

Kareem AJ Hunt (born August 6, 1995) is an American football running back for the Cleveland Browns of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Toledo and was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the third round of the 2017 NFL Draft. As a rookie in 2017, he led the NFL in rushing yards and was selected to the Pro Bowl. In November 2018, Hunt was released by the Chiefs after video of a violent incident involving him was released.

Kelechi Osemele

Kelechi Keith Ayo Osemele (; kay-LAY-chee oh-SEM-ə-lee; born June 24, 1989) is an American football offensive guard for the New York Jets of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Iowa State. He was selected by the Baltimore Ravens in the second round of the 2012 NFL Draft, and was a rookie starter throughout the team's Super Bowl XLVII championship run that season.

List of Pro Bowl players, B

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have been selected to play in the NFL's annual Pro Bowl game, beginning with the 1950 season.

Between 1938 and 1942, an NFL all star team played the league champion in the NFL All-Star Game. Participants in these games are not recognized by the NFL as Pro Bowlers, and they are not included in this list. No games were played between 1943 and 1950.

Between 1961 and 1969, the NFL and AFL played separate all-star games. This list includes players who were selected to play in the American Football League All-Star game during that period.

List of Pro Bowl players, C-F

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have been selected to play in the NFL's annual Pro Bowl game, beginning with the 1950 season.

Between 1938 and 1942, an NFL all star team played the league champion in the NFL All-Star Game. Participants in these games are not recognized by the NFL as Pro Bowlers, and they are not included in this list. No games were played between 1943 and 1950.

Between 1961 and 1969, the NFL and AFL played separate all-star games. This list includes players who were selected to play in the American Football League All-Star game during that period.

List of Pro Bowl players, I-K

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have been selected to play in the NFL's annual Pro Bowl game, beginning with the 1950 season.

Between 1938 and 1942, an NFL all star team played the league champion in the NFL All-Star Game. Participants in these games are not recognized by the NFL as Pro Bowlers, and they are not included in this list. No games were played between 1943 and 1950.

Between 1961 and 1969, the NFL and AFL played separate all-star games. This list includes players who were selected to play in the American Football League All-Star game during that period.

List of Pro Bowl players, N-R

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have been selected to play in the NFL's annual Pro Bowl game, beginning with the 1950 season.

Between 1938 and 1942, an NFL all star team played the league champion in the NFL All-Star Game. Participants in these games are not recognized by the NFL as Pro Bowlers, and they are not included in this list. No games were played between 1943 and 1950.

Between 1961 and 1969, the NFL and AFL played separate all-star games. This list includes players who were selected to play in the American Football League All-Star game during that period.

List of Pro Bowl players, S-V

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have been selected to play in the NFL's annual Pro Bowl game, beginning with the 1950 season.

Between 1938 and 1942, an NFL all star team played the league champion in the NFL All-Star Game. Participants in these games are not recognized by the NFL as Pro Bowlers, and they are not included in this list. No games were played between 1943 and 1950.

Between 1961 and 1969, the NFL and AFL played separate all-star games. This list includes players who were selected to play in the American Football League All-Star game during that period.

Marshon Lattimore

Marshon Demond Lattimore (born May 20, 1996) is an American football cornerback for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Ohio State, and was drafted by the Saints 11th overall in the 2017 NFL Draft.

Pharoh Cooper

Pharoh Cooper (born March 7, 1995) is an American football wide receiver and return specialist for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams in the fourth round of the 2016 NFL Draft. He played college football at South Carolina.

T. J. Lang

Thomas John "T. J." Lang (born September 20, 1987) is an American football guard who is currently a free agent. He played college football at Eastern Michigan and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the fourth round of the 2009 NFL Draft. Lang was a member of the Packers' Super Bowl XLV win over the Pittsburgh Steelers, and has also played for the Detroit Lions.

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