2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship was the 10th edition of the CONCACAF Women's Championship (also known as the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup or the CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifying Tournament), the quadrennial international football championship organised by CONCACAF for the women's national teams of the North, Central American and Caribbean region. Eight teams played in the tournament, which took place from 4–17 October in the United States.[2]

The tournament served as the CONCACAF qualifiers to the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France. The top three teams qualified for the World Cup, while the fourth-placed team advanced to a play-off against the third-placed team from the South American confederation, CONMEBOL.[3] It also determined the CONCACAF teams playing at the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament in Lima.[4]

The United States were the defending champions of the competition. They successfully defended their title as hosts, winning the final 2–0 against Canada for their 8th CONCACAF Women's Championship title.[5]

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship
Tournament details
Host countryUnited States
Dates4–17 October 2018[1]
Teams8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)3 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
Champions United States (8th title)
Runners-up Canada
Third place Jamaica
Fourth place Panama
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored83 (5.19 per match)
Top scorer(s)United States Alex Morgan (7 goals)
Best player(s)United States Julie Ertz
Best young playerJamaica Jody Brown
Best goalkeeperPanama Yenith Bailey
Fair play award United States

Qualification

Regional qualification tournaments were held to determine the teams playing in the final tournament.

Qualified teams

The following eight teams qualified for the final tournament. Canada, Mexico, and the United States, as members of the North American Football Union (NAFU), qualified automatically. Two teams from the Central American Football Union (UNCAF) and three teams from the Caribbean Football Union (CFU) qualified from their regional qualifying competitions.

Team Qualification Appearance Previous best performance Previous FIFA Women's World Cup appearances FIFA ranking
at start of event[6]
North American Zone (NAFU)
 Canada Automatic 9th Champions (1998, 2010) 6 5
 Mexico Automatic 9th Runners-up (1998, 2010) 3 24
 United States (title holders & hosts) Automatic 9th Champions (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2014) 7 1
 Costa Rica Central American winners 7th Runners-up (2014) 1 34
 Panama Central American runners-up 3rd Group stage (2002, 2006) 0 66
 Jamaica Caribbean winners 6th Fourth place (2006) 0 64
 Trinidad and Tobago Caribbean runners-up 10th Third place (1991) 0 52
 Cuba Caribbean third place 1st Debut 0 88

Venues

The venues were announced by CONCACAF on 8 April 2018. Sahlen's Stadium and H-E-B Park hosted the group stage matches, while Toyota Stadium hosted the four matches in the knockout stage.[7]

Cary, North Carolina Edinburg, Texas Frisco, Texas
Sahlen's Stadium H-E-B Park Toyota Stadium
Capacity: 10,000 Capacity: 9,735 Capacity: 20,500
WakeMed Soccer Park 2013 Pizza Hut Park

Draw

The draw for the final tournament was held on 4 September 2018, 10:00 EDT (UTC−4), at the Univision Studios in Miami.[8][9] The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four teams. They were seeded into four pots. Pot 1 contained the United States, seeded in Group A, and Canada, seeded in Group B. The remaining six teams were allocated to Pots 2–4 based on the CONCACAF Women's Rankings. The two teams from UNCAF could not be drawn into the same group.

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4

Squads

The provisional 35-player roster (4 must be goalkeepers) for each team was announced by CONCACAF on 10 September 2018.[10] The final 20-player roster (2 must be goalkeepers) for each team was announced by CONCACAF on 26 September 2018.[11] After the final 20-player roster was submitted, only injury-related changes would be submitted until 24 hours before each team's first match.[12]

Group stage

The top two teams of each group advance to the semi-finals.

Tiebreakers

Teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss). The rankings of teams in each group are determined as follows (regulations Article 12.12):[12]

  1. points obtained in all group matches;
  2. goal difference in all group matches;
  3. number of goals scored in all group matches;

If two or more teams are equal on the basis of the above three criteria, their rankings are determined as followed:

  1. points obtained in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  2. goal difference in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  3. number of goals scored in the group matches between the teams concerned;
  4. fair play points in all group matches:
    • first yellow card: minus 1 point;
    • indirect red card (second yellow card): minus 3 points;
    • direct red card: minus 4 points;
    • yellow card and direct red card: minus 5 points;
  5. drawing of lots by CONCACAF.

Group A

All times are local, EDT (UTC−4).[13]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  United States (H) 3 3 0 0 18 0 +18 9 Knockout stage
2  Panama 3 2 0 1 5 5 0 6
3  Mexico 3 1 0 2 4 9 −5 3
4  Trinidad and Tobago 3 0 0 3 1 14 −13 0
Trinidad and Tobago 0–3 Panama
Report
United States 6–0 Mexico
Report
Panama 0–5 United States
Report
Mexico 4–1 Trinidad and Tobago
Report
Panama 2–0 Mexico
Report
Trinidad and Tobago 0–7 United States
Report

Group B

All times are local, CDT (UTC−5).[13]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Canada 3 3 0 0 17 1 +16 9 Knockout stage
2  Jamaica 3 2 0 1 10 2 +8 6
3  Costa Rica 3 1 0 2 9 4 +5 3
4  Cuba 3 0 0 3 0 29 −29 0
Costa Rica 8–0 Cuba
Report
Canada 2–0 Jamaica
Report
Jamaica 1–0 Costa Rica
Report
Cuba 0–12 Canada
Report
Cuba 0–9 Jamaica
Report
Costa Rica 1–3 Canada
Report

Knockout stage

In the semi-finals, if the match was level at the end of 90 minutes, no extra time would be played and the match would be decided by a penalty shoot-out. In the third place match and final, if the match was level at the end of 90 minutes, extra time would be played, and if still tied after extra time, the match would be decided by a penalty shoot-out (Regulations Article 12.14).[12]

Bracket

All times are local, CDT (UTC−5).[13]

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
14 October – Frisco
 
 
 Panama0
 
17 October – Frisco
 
 Canada7
 
 Canada0
 
14 October – Frisco
 
 United States2
 
 United States6
 
 
 Jamaica0
 
Third place play-off
 
 
17 October – Frisco
 
 
 Panama2 (2)
 
 
 Jamaica (p)2 (4)

Semi-finals

Panama 0–7 Canada
Report
United States 6–0 Jamaica
Report

Canada and United States qualified for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Panama and Jamaica entered into the third place play-off.

Third place play-off

Panama 2–2 (a.e.t.) Jamaica
Report
Penalties
2–4

Jamaica qualified for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Panama entered CONCACAF–CONMEBOL play-off vs. Argentina.

Final

Canada 0–2 United States
Report

Awards

Individual awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament.[14]

Award Player
Golden Ball United States Julie Ertz
Golden Boot United States Alex Morgan (7 goals)
Golden Glove Panama Yenith Bailey
Young Player Jamaica Jody Brown
Fair Play  United States
Best XI
Goalkeepers Defenders Midfielders Forwards
Panama Yenith Bailey

Goalscorers

There were 83 goals scored in 16 matches, for an average of 5.19 goals per match.

7 goals

6 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

Qualification for international tournaments

Qualified teams for FIFA Women's World Cup

The following three teams from CONCACAF qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup. Panama failed to qualify losing out the play-off to 2018 Copa América Femenina third-placed team, Argentina.

Team Qualified on Previous appearances in FIFA Women's World Cup1
 Canada 14 October 2018[15] 6 (1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 United States 14 October 2018[15] 7 (1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 Jamaica 17 October 2018[16] 0 (debut)
1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

Qualified teams for Pan American Games

The tournament was used to determine the four teams from CONCACAF which would qualify for the 2019 Pan American Games women's football tournament. The top team from each of the three zones, i.e., Caribbean (CFU), Central American (UNCAF), and North American (NAFU), would qualify, with the fourth team to be determined by CONCACAF at a later date.[4] However, both United States and Canada declined to participate to focus on the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, so Mexico qualified for the North American berth.[17]

Team Zone Qualified on Previous appearances in Pan American Games2
 Jamaica CFU 11 October 2018 1 (2007)
 Panama UNCAF 11 October 2018 1 (2007)
 Mexico[17] NAFU 2019 (confirmed by CONCACAF) 5 (1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 Costa Rica[17] UNCAF 2019 (confirmed by CONCACAF) 4 (1999, 2003, 2011, 2015)
2 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.

References

  1. ^ "2018 Concacaf Women's Championship to be Held in Cary, N.C., Edinburg, Texas & Frisco, Texas". US Soccer. 8 April 2018.
  2. ^ "United States Set to Host 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship in October". www.concacaf.com. 23 March 2018. Retrieved 23 March 2018.
  3. ^ "Circular #1565 – FIFA women's tournaments 2018–2019" (PDF). FIFA.com. 11 November 2016.
  4. ^ a b "Qualification System manual" (PDF). www.panamsports.org/. Pan American Sports Organization. 25 April 2018. Retrieved 25 April 2018.
  5. ^ "Lavelle and Morgan lift the United States over Canada for the 2018 CWC title". CONCACAF. 17 October 2018.
  6. ^ "Women's Ranking – 28 September 2018 (CONCACAF)". FIFA.com.
  7. ^ "2018 Concacaf Women's Championship Final Rounds Set for Frisco, Texas, with Group Stages to Be Played in Cary, N.C. and Edinburg, Texas". CONCACAF.com. 8 April 2018.
  8. ^ "Draw Confirmed for the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". CONCACAF.com. 7 August 2018.
  9. ^ "Draw Reveals Groups for the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". CONCACAF.com. 4 September 2018.
  10. ^ "Provisional 35 Player Rosters Announced for the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". CONCACAF.com. 10 September 2018.
  11. ^ "Final 20-Player Rosters Announced for the 2018 Concacaf Women's Championship". CONCACAF.com. 26 September 2018.
  12. ^ a b c "2018 Concacaf Women's Championship Regulations" (PDF). CONCACAF.
  13. ^ a b c "Schedule" (PDF). CONCACAF.com.
  14. ^ "Concacaf announces the individual awards and Best XI of the CWC". CONCACAF. 17 October 2018.
  15. ^ a b "USA, Canada win passage to France". FIFA.com. 15 October 2018.
  16. ^ "Jamaica claim first-ever Women's World Cup berth". FIFA.com. 18 October 2018.
  17. ^ a b c "Selección Femenina de fútbol estará en los Panamericanos 2019 pese a no haber clasificado" (in Spanish). La Nación. 25 February 2019.

External links

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship qualification

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship qualification is a women's football competition which decides the participating teams of the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

A total of eight teams played in the final tournament, which was held in the United States.

2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship squads

The 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship is an upcoming international women's football tournament held in the United States from 4 to 17 October 2018. The eight national teams involved in the tournament are required to register a squad of 20 players, including two goalkeepers. Only players in these squads are eligible to take part in the tournament.

The provisional 35-player squad lists were announced on 10 September 2018. From the preliminary squad, the final list of 20 players per national team will be submitted to CONCACAF 24 hours before each team's first match.

The final 20-player roster (2 must be goalkeepers) for each team was announced by CONCACAF on 26 September 2018. Following this, only injury-related replacements are permitted.The position listed for each player is per the official squad list published by CONCACAF. The age listed for each player is on 4 October 2018, the first day of the tournament. The numbers of caps and goals listed for each player do not include any matches played after the start of tournament. The nationality for each club reflects the national association (not the league) to which the club is affiliated.

Anuvis Angulo

Anuvis Angulo (born 3 May 2001) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a forward for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in one match for Panama at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Costa Rica women's national football team

The Costa Rica women's national football team is controlled by the Costa Rican Football Federation. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Central American region along with Guatemala.

Daniela Solera

Daniela Solera (born 21 July 1997) is a Costa Rican international footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for the Costa Rica women's national football team. She appeared in three matches for Costa Rica at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Emma Regan

Emma Regan (born January 28, 2000) is a Canadian international soccer player who plays as a defender. She appeared for the Canada women's national soccer team in one match at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Erika Hernández

Erika Hernández (born 17 March 1999) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a forward for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in five matches for Panama and scored one goal at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Fabiola Villalobos

Fabiola Villalobos (born 13 March 1998) is a Costa Rican international footballer who plays as a forward for the Costa Rica women's national football team. She appeared in two matches for Costa Rica at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Hilary Jaén

Hilary Jaén (born 29 August 2002) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a defender for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in four matches for Panama at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Katherine Castillo

Katherine Castillo (born 23 March 1996) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in four matches for Panama at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Kenia Rangel

Kenia Rangel (born 6 August 1995) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in five matches for Panama and scored one goal at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship. She scored a hat trick against El Salvador in a 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship qualification match.

Laurie Batista

Laurie Batista (born 29 May 1996) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in five matches for Panama at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Mariela Campos

Mariela Campos (born 4 January 1991) is a Costa Rican international footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Costa Rica women's national football team. She appeared in one match for Costa Rica at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

María Montenegro

María Montenegro (born 17 September 2000) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a defender for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in two matches for Panama at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

María Paula Salas

María Paula Salas (born 12 July 2002) is a Costa Rican international footballer who plays as a forward for the Costa Rica women's national football team. She appeared in two matches for Costa Rica at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Mexico women's national football team

The Mexico women's national football team represents Mexico on the international stage. The squad is governed by the Mexican Football Federation and competes within CONCACAF, the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football. Holding gold medals in the Central American and Caribbean Games and a silver medal in the Pan American Games, La Tri's senior squad is currently ranked 27 1 (12 July 2019). The team also boasts one silver and one bronze in the Women's World Cup, though these accomplishments are not officially recognized, as they took place prior to FIFA's recognition of the women's game. When it placed second in 1971, Mexico hosted the second edition of this unofficial tournament. In addition to its senior team, Mexico fields U-20 and U-17 squads as well, with the latter having reached the final during the 2018 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup.

Coached by Leonardo Cuéllar for most of the team's official existence, La Tri's senior squad has participated in three Women's World Cups and one edition of the Summer Olympic Games.

The senior squad was established in 1963, but its first FIFA-recognized game was in 1991.

Onelys Alvarado

Onelys Alvarado (born 20 August 1993) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a defender for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in three matches for Panama at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Priscilla Chinchilla

Priscilla Chinchilla (born 11 July 2001) is a Costa Rican international footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Costa Rica women's national football team. She appeared in three matches for Costa Rica and scored two goals at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Rebeca Espinosa

Rebeca Espinosa (born 5 July 1992) is a Panamanian international footballer who plays as a defender for the Panama women's national football team. She appeared in one match for Panama at the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

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