2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup

The 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup was the 19th edition of the AFC Women's Asian Cup, the quadrennial international football tournament in Asia competed by the women's national teams in the Asian Football Confederation (AFC). It was originally scheduled to be held in Jordan between 7 and 22 April 2018, but later was changed to 6 to 20 April 2018.[1][2][3]

The tournament served as the final stage of Asian qualification for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the top five teams qualifying for the World Cup in France.[4]

Japan defeated Australia 1–0 in the final to win their second consecutive title. In the third-place match the same day, China defeated Thailand 3–1.[5]

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup
كأس آسيا لكرة القدم للسيدات 2018
2018 AFC Women's Cup logo
Tournament details
Host countryJordan
CityAmman
Dates6–20 April
Teams8 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)2 (in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Japan (2nd title)
Runners-up Australia
Third place China PR
Fourth place Thailand
Tournament statistics
Matches played17
Goals scored66 (3.88 per match)
Attendance31,537 (1,855 per match)
Top scorer(s)China Li Ying (7 goals)
Best player(s)Japan Mana Iwabuchi
Fair play award Japan

Qualification

The draw for the qualifiers was held on 21 January 2017.[6] The top three finishers of the last AFC Women's Cup qualified automatically and did not have to enter qualifying, while Jordan also qualified automatically as hosts but decided to also participate in the qualifying competition.[7] The matches were played from 3 to 12 April 2017.[8]

Qualified teams

The following eight teams qualified for the tournament.[9]

Team Qualified as Appearance Previous best performance FIFA ranking
at start of event[10]
 Jordan Hosts 2nd Group stage (2014) 51
 Japan 2014 champions 16th Champions (2014) 11
 Australia 2014 runners-up 6th Champions (2010) 6
 China PR 2014 third place 14th Champions (1986, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2006) 17
 Philippines Group A runners-up[note 1] 9th Group stage (1981, 1983, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003) 72
 South Korea Group B winners 12th Third place (2003) 16
 Thailand Group C winners 16th Champions (1983) 30
 Vietnam Group D winners 8th Group stage (1999, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2014) 35

Notes:

  1. ^ Since the Group A winners Jordan already automatically qualified for the final tournament as hosts, Philippines also qualified for the final tournament as runners-up.[11]

Venues

The competition was played in two venues in the city of Amman.

Amman Amman
Amman International Stadium King Abdullah II Stadium
Staad Amman Aldowali.jpeg King Abdullah II Stadium, Amman, Jordan
Capacity: 17,619 Capacity: 13,000

Draw

The final draw was held on 9 December 2017, 13:00 EET (UTC+2), at the King Hussein bin Talal Convention Center on the eastern shores of the Dead Sea.[12] The eight teams were drawn into two groups of four teams.[13] The teams were seeded according to their performance in the 2014 AFC Women's Asian Cup final tournament and qualification, with the hosts Jordan automatically seeded and assigned to Position A1 in the draw.[14]

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3 Pot 4
  1.  Jordan (hosts)
  2.  Japan

Squads

Each team must register a squad of minimum 18 players and maximum 23 players, minimum three of whom must be goalkeepers (Regulations Articles 31.4 and 31.5).[15]

Match officials

A total of 10 referees and 12 assistant referees were appointed for the final tournament.

Referees
  • Australia Kate Jacewicz
  • Australia Casey Reibelt
  • China Qin Liang
  • Iran Mahsa Ghorbani
  • Japan Yamashita Yoshimi
  • North Korea Ri Hyang-ok
  • South Korea Oh Hyeon-jeong
  • Myanmar Thein Thein Aye
  • Uzbekistan Edita Mirabidova
  • Vietnam Công Thi Dựng
Assistant referees
  • China Cui Yongmei
  • China Fang Yan
  • India Uvena Fernandes
  • Iran Ensieh Khabaz
  • Japan Maiko Hagio
  • Japan Naomi Teshirogi
  • North Korea Hong Kum-nyo
  • South Korea Kim Kyoung-min
  • South Korea Lee Seul-Gi
  • State of Palestine Heba Saadieh
  • Singapore Rohaidah Bte Mohd Nasir
  • Vietnam Trương Thị Lệ Trinh

Group stage

The top two teams of each group qualified for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup as well as the semi-finals. The third-placed team of each group entered the fifth-placed match.

Tiebreakers

Teams are ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss), and if tied on points, the following tiebreaking criteria are applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings (Regulations Article 11.5):[15]

  1. Points in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  2. Goal difference in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  3. Goals scored in head-to-head matches among tied teams;
  4. If more than two teams are tied, and after applying all head-to-head criteria above, a subset of teams are still tied, all head-to-head criteria above are reapplied exclusively to this subset of teams;
  5. Goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Goals scored in all group matches;
  7. Penalty shoot-out if only two teams are tied and they met in the last round of the group;
  8. Disciplinary points (yellow card = 1 point, red card as a result of two yellow cards = 3 points, direct red card = 3 points, yellow card followed by direct red card = 4 points);
  9. Drawing of lots.

All times are local, EEST (UTC+3).[16]

Schedule
Matchday Dates Matches
Matchday 1 6–7 April 2018 1 v 4, 2 v 3
Matchday 2 9–10 April 2018 4 v 2, 3 v 1
Matchday 3 12–13 April 2018 1 v 2, 3 v 4

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  China PR 3 3 0 0 15 1 +14 9 Knockout stage and
2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2  Thailand 3 2 0 1 9 6 +3 6
3  Philippines 3 1 0 2 3 7 −4 3 Fifth place match
4  Jordan (H) 3 0 0 3 3 16 −13 0
China PR 4–0 Thailand
Report
Jordan 1–2 Philippines
Report
Philippines 0–3 China PR
Report
Thailand 6–1 Jordan
Report
Jordan 1–8 China PR
Report
Thailand 3–1 Philippines
Report

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Australia 3 1 2 0 9 1 +8 5[a] Knockout stage and
2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2  Japan 3 1 2 0 5 1 +4 5[a]
3  South Korea 3 1 2 0 4 0 +4 5[a] Fifth place match
4  Vietnam 3 0 0 3 0 16 −16 0
  1. ^ a b c Head-to-head results: Australia 0–0 South Korea, South Korea 0–0 Japan, Japan 1–1 Australia. Head-to-head standings:
    • Australia: 2 pts, 0 GD, 1 GF
    • Japan: 2 pts, 0 GD, 1 GF
    • South Korea: 2 pts, 0 GD, 0 GF
    South Korea are ranked third on head-to-head goals scored. Australia and Japan are tied on their own head-to-head result, and are ranked on total goal difference.
Japan 4–0 Vietnam
Report
Australia 0–0 South Korea
Report
South Korea 0–0 Japan
Report
Vietnam 0–8 Australia
Report
Japan 1–1 Australia
Report
South Korea 4–0 Vietnam
Report

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, extra time and penalty shoot-out are used to decide the winner if necessary, except for the third place match where penalty shoot-out (no extra time) is used to decide the winner if necessary.[15]

Bracket

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
17 April – King Abdullah II
 
 
 China PR1
 
20 April – Amman International
 
 Japan3
 
 Japan1
 
17 April – King Abdullah II
 
 Australia0
 
 Australia (p)2 (3)
 
 
 Thailand2 (1)
 
Third place match
 
 
20 April – Amman International
 
 
 China PR3
 
 
 Thailand1
 
Fifth place match
 
  
 
16 April – Amman International
 
 
 Philippines0
 
 
 South Korea5
 

Fifth place match

Winner qualified for 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Philippines 0–5 South Korea
Report

Semi-finals

Australia 2–2 (a.e.t.) Thailand
Report
Penalties
3–1
China PR 1–3 Japan
Report

Third place match

China PR 3–1 Thailand
Report

Final

Japan 1–0 Australia
Report

Awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament:

Most Valuable Player[17] Top Scorer[18] Fairplay Award[19]
Japan Mana Iwabuchi China Li Ying (7 goals)  Japan

Goalscorers

There were 66 goals scored in 17 matches, for an average of 3.88 goals per match.

7 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

2 own goals

Qualified teams for FIFA Women's World Cup

The following five teams from AFC qualify for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Team Qualified on Previous appearances in FIFA Women's World Cup1
 China PR 9 April 2018[20] 6 (1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2015)
 Thailand 12 April 2018[21] 1 (2015)
 Australia 13 April 2018[22] 6 (19952, 19992, 20032, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 Japan 13 April 2018[22] 7 (1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, 2007, 2011, 2015)
 South Korea 16 April 2018[23] 2 (2003, 2015)
1 Bold indicates champions for that year. Italic indicates hosts for that year.
2 Australia qualified as a member of the OFC in 1995, 1999 and 2003.

Broadcasting rights and sponsorships

Le Sports acquired the all-media broadcasting and signal production rights in China in 2015,[24] but they collapsed due to financial problems thus giving in all the rights they've acquired and transferred them to China Central Television and PP Sports in 2017. Tire manufacturer Continental announced they would be official sponsor.[25]

References

  1. ^ "Jordan to host AFC Women's Asian Cup 2018 finals". AFC. 4 September 2016.
  2. ^ "AFC Competitions Calendar 2018". AFC. 11 January 2018.
  3. ^ "AFC WOMEN'S COMMITTEE MAKES KEY DECISIONS". AFC. 22 September 2017.
  4. ^ "Circular #1565 - FIFA women's tournaments 2018-2019" (PDF). FIFA.com. 11 November 2016.
  5. ^ "Yokoyama the hero as Japan emerge champions". the-afc.com. 20 April 2018.
  6. ^ "Teams learn AFC Women's Asian Cup Jordan 2018 qualifying opponents". Asian Football Confederation. Retrieved 21 January 2017.
  7. ^ "Teams set to find out path to AFC Women's Asian Cup Jordan 2018". AFC. 20 January 2017.
  8. ^ "AFC Calendar of Competitions 2017 (UPDATED)" (PDF). the-AFC.com. 12 April 2016. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  9. ^ "Line-up complete for AFC Women's Asian Cup Jordan 2018". AFC. 13 April 2017.
  10. ^ "Women's Ranking – 23 March 2018 (AFC)". FIFA.com.
  11. ^ "Philippines qualify for the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup". AFC. 10 April 2017.
  12. ^ "Contenders to learn AFC Women's Asian Cup fate at official draw". AFC. 8 December 2017.
  13. ^ "AFC Women's Asian Cup draw pairs heavyweights Japan and Australia". AFC. 9 December 2017.
  14. ^ "AFC Women's Asian Cup 2018 Official Draw". YouTube. 9 December 2017.
  15. ^ a b c "AFC Women's Asian Cup 2018 Competition Regulations". AFC.
  16. ^ "Match Schedule". AFC Women's Asian Cup Jordan 2018.
  17. ^ "Iwabuchi credits Japan team unity for MVP accolade". AFC. 20 April 2018.
  18. ^ "Li Ying lands Top Scorer award". AFC. 20 April 2018.
  19. ^ "Yokoyama the hero as Japan emerge champions". AFC. 20 April 2018.
  20. ^ "China PR book ticket to France 2019". FIFA.com. 9 April 2018.
  21. ^ "Thailand qualify for second successive Women's World Cup". FIFA.com. 12 April 2018.
  22. ^ a b "Australia and Japan qualify for France 2019". FIFA.com. 13 April 2018.
  23. ^ "Korea Republic secure France 2019 qualification". FIFA.com. 16 April 2018.
  24. ^ "Le Sports Acquires China Rights For AFC". 28 October 2015.
  25. ^ "Continental becomes Official Sponsor of 2019 AFC Asian Cup in the United Arab Emirates". Archived from the original on 3 April 2016. Retrieved 17 April 2016.

External links

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup Final

The 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup Final was a football match at the Amman International Stadium in Amman, Jordan which determined the winner of the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup. The final was contested between Japan and Australia, teams which were also the finalists of the previous edition held in 2014.

Japan defeated Australia 1–0 in the final to win their second consecutive title.

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification

The 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification was the qualification tournament for the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup.A total of 21 teams entered the qualification tournament, which decided four of the eight participating teams in the final tournament held in Jordan. This tournament also served as the first stage of Asian qualification for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the top five teams of the final tournament qualifying for the World Cup.

2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup squads

Each country's final squad has to comprise 23 players. A preliminary squad of 18–50 players was submitted earlier.On 29 March, AFC announced the squads for teams of both the groups.

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification process decided all 24 teams which will play in the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup, with the hosts France qualifying automatically. It is the eighth FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international women's football world championship tournament. The tournament is the third to be hosted in Europe, after the 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup in Sweden and the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup in Germany.

Alesa Dolino

Alesa Dolino (born October 26, 1992) is a Filipino women's international footballer who plays as a defender. She is a member of the Philippines women's national football team. She was part of the team at the 2015 AFF Women's Championship and 2016 AFF Women's Championship. She played for the collegiate team of the Far Eastern University (FEU) in Philippines. With FEU she won the 2015 PFF Women's Cup and scored two goals including one at the final and became the best player overall and Best Defender/MVP of the championships.

After graduating from FEU in 2016, Dolino joined OutKast F.C. which participated in the inaugural season of the PFF Women's League.Dolino is also part of the Philippines' 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup squad.

Hali Long

Hali Long is a Filipino association footballer who has played for the Philippines women's national football team.

Iraq women's national football team

The Iraq women's national football team is the female representative football team for Iraq.The team played its first international match in 2010. Their first participation in a major tournament will be the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification.

Jang Sel-gi

Jang Sel-gi (born 31 May 1994) is a South Korean footballer who plays as a defender or a midfielder for WK League club Incheon Red Angels and the South Korea national team. She previously played for INAC Kobe Leonessa in the Nadeshiko League. She was named Asian Young Footballer of the Year in 2013. A popular figure with team mates and supporters, Jang revels in her unusual nickname of "The Welsh Corgi".

Kearra Bastes-Jones

Kearra Bastes-Jones (born 29 May 2001) is a Filipino association footballer who has played for the Philippines women's national football team.

Bastes-Jones attends Bishop Amat High School in La Puente, California and is part of her school's women's soccer team. She was named into the San Gabriel Valley Tribune, Pasadena Star-News, Whittier Daily News Girls Soccer All-Area First Team.Bastes-Jones is part of the Philippines women's national football team that participated at the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup She started in the Philippines' first match against host Jordan. The match ended in a 2-1 win.Her mother, Hariett Bastes, traces her roots to Davao.

Lee Min-a

Lee Min-a (born 8 November 1991) is a South Korean footballer who plays as a midfielder for Nadeshiko League club INAC Kobe Leonessa and the South Korea national team. She previously played for WK League club Incheon Hyundai Steel Red Angels.

Miranda Nild

Miranda Nild (her name of birth), also known as Suchawadee Nildhamrong (Thai: สุชาวดี นิลธำรงค์; born April 1, 1997), is an American-born Thai footballer who plays as a forward for the Thailand women's national team.

Philippines women's national football team

The Philippines women's national football team is the women's national football team of the Philippines. It is controlled by the Philippine Football Federation, the governing body of football in the country.

The women's national football team of the Philippines was formalized in the 1980s. The Philippines has participated in the Women's Asian Cup, first participating in 1981 when the tournament was still known as the AFC Women's Championship. The Philippines hosted the tournament in 1999 in Iloilo and Bacolod. They had a hiatus from the continental tournament after taking part in 2003 with a qualification process being introduced in the 2006 edition. They returned to the AFC Women's Asian Cup in 2018 after qualifying in 2017. In that iteration of the tournament, they progress to the knockout stages for the very first time in their Asian Cup participation history.

In Southeast Asian football, the Philippine women's team has limited success in the AFF Women's Championship and Southeast Asian Games with their only honor being the third place finish at the 1985 Southeast Asian Games which saw only three teams participating in the women's football event.

The head coach of the national team since August 2018 is Marnelli Dimzon and is 74th in the women's FIFA ranking as of December 2018.

Rabah Benlarbi

Rabah Benlarbi is a French football coach who was the head coach of the Philippines women's national football team, leading them in the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup. He was part of Juventus F.C.'s backroom staff from 2001 until 2003.

Sara Castañeda

Sara Castañeda (born December 5, 1996) is a Filipino footballer who plays as a midfielder for the Philippines women's national football team.

Sarina Bolden

Sarina Bolden is a Filipino association footballer who has played for the Philippines women's national football team as a midfielder.

Singapore women's national football team

Women's football (soccer) in Singapore has become more popular since the Football Association of Singapore (FAS) took women’s football under its wing in 2000. A Women’s Football Division was set up with the FAS in September 2004.

The rapidly growing interest for this sport holds great promise for the future of women’s football in Singapore. Currently, the ground for local women’s football is still being laid, and the grass is still growing but the trend is rising and the response has been overwhelming.The objectives of the FAS Women’s Football Committee is to increase awareness, knowledge and popularity and raise the standard of the women's football in Singapore. It hopes to create a platform to develop future football talents and media icons and to upgrade the status of women's football in Singapore.In 2005 Arafura Games held in Darwin, Australia, the Singapore Women’s team produced a fine showing and won the bronze medal. The Arafura Games is held every two years and is a leading international sporting competition for emerging champions of the Asia Pacific region.In 2005, the country was one of seven teams that included Brunei, Thailand, Indonesia, East Timor, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Myanmar and Singapore, that were expected to field a women's football team to compete at the Asian Games in Marikina in December.Singapore women's national football team is still considered a minnows in the region, being thrashed frequently by fellow Asian teams or even ASEAN teams. Despite the men counterparts is achieving some commendable results, the women's team is still young. There is still a lot of work for the FAS to do for the lioness, if they are to succeed like the Lions.

Syria women's national football team

The Syria national women's football team, is the national women's football team of Syria. Their best achievement was in 2005 when they finished third in the West Asian Football Federation Championship.

Tajikistan women's national football team

The Tajikistan women's national football team represent Tajikistan in international women's football. The team played its first ever international match at the 2018 AFC Women's Asian Cup qualification tournament on 3 April 2017, winning 1–0 against Iraq. Its inaugural FIFA ranking on June 23, 2017, was 108th.

Thailand women's national football team results

This article lists the results and fixtures for the Thailand women's national football team.

Tournaments
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