2017 in archosaur paleontology

The year 2017 in archosaur paleontology was eventful. Archosaurs include the only living dinosaur group — birds — and the reptile crocodilians, plus all extinct dinosaurs, extinct crocodilian relatives, and pterosaurs. Archosaur palaeontology is the scientific study of those animals, especially as they existed before the Holocene Epoch began about 11,700 years ago. The year 2017 in paleontology included various significant developments regarding archosaurs.

This article records new taxa of fossil archosaurs of every kind that have been described during the year 2017, as well as other significant discoveries and events related to paleontology of archosaurs that occurred in the year 2017.

List of years in archosaur paleontology
In paleontology
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
In science
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020

General research

  • A study on the evolution of forelimb anatomy, musculature and joint ranges of motion from early archosaurs to sauropodomorph dinosaurs based on data from Mussaurus patagonicus and extant freshwater crocodile is published by Otero et al. (2017).[1]

Pseudosuchians

Research

New taxa

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Cassissuchus[30]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Buscalioni

Early Cretaceous (Barremian)

Calizas de La Huérgina Formation

 Spain

A member of the family Gobiosuchidae. The type species is C. sanziuami.

Coahomasuchus chathamensis[31]

Sp. nov

Valid

Heckert, Fraser & Schneider

Late Triassic

Pekin Formation

 United States
( North Carolina)

An aetosaur.

Deltasuchus[32]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Adams, Noto & Drumheller

Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian)

Woodbine Formation

 United States
( Texas)

A neosuchian crocodylomorph related to Paluxysuchus newmani. The type species is D. motherali.

Ieldraan[33]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Foffa et al.

Middle Jurassic (Callovian)

Oxford Clay Formation

 United Kingdom

A member of the family Metriorhynchidae. Genus includes new species I. melkshamensis.

Knoetschkesuchus[34]

Gen. et sp. et comb. nov

Valid

Schwarz, Raddatz & Wings

Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian)

Camadas de Guimarota
Süntel Formation

 Germany
 Portugal

A member of Atoposauridae. The type species is K. langenbergensis; genus also includes "Theriosuchus" guimarotae Schwarz & Salisbury (2005).

Lemmysuchus[35]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Johnson et al.

Middle Jurassic (Callovian)

Oxford Clay

 France
 United Kingdom

A member of the family Teleosauridae; a new genus for "Steneosaurus" obtusidens Andrews (1909).

Maomingosuchus[36]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Shan et al.

Eocene

 China

A new genus for "Tomistoma" petrolica Yeh (1958).

Mourasuchus pattersoni[37]

Sp. nov

Valid

Cidade et al.

Late Miocene

Urumaco Formation

 Venezuela

A caiman.

Turcosuchus[38]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Jouve et al.

Early Cretaceous (Barremian)

İncigez Formation

 Turkey

A member of Crocodyliformes belonging to the family Hylaeochampsidae. The type species is T. okani.

Non-avian dinosaurs

Research

New taxa

Birds

Research

  • A study on the method allowing estimation of wing loading and aspect ratio in Mesozoic birds and on flight modes that were possible for Mesozoic birds is published by Serrano et al. (2017).[211]
  • A study on whether sternal keel length and ilium length were correlated in bird evolution, based on data from extant birds and Mesozoic birds, is published by Zhao, Liu and Li (2017).[212]
  • A study on the impact of varying oxygen concentrations, global temperatures and air densities on the flight performance of extinct birds and on major diversification events which took place during the evolution of birds is published by Serrano et al. (2017).[213]
  • A study on the pectoral girdle morphology of Mesozoic birds and its implications for the evolution of the avian flight musculature (specifically the supracoracoideus muscle) is published by Mayr (2017).[214]
  • A study on the morphological characteristics and evolution of the pygostyle and tail feathers in Early Cretaceous birds and closely related non-avian theropods is published by Wang & O'Connor (2017).[215]
  • A study on the postnatal skeletal development of limb bones in four species of extant aquatic birds (the streaked shearwater, the Japanese cormorant, the black-tailed gull and the rhinoceros auklet) and its implications for the assessment of ontogenetic stage of fossil and skeletal bird specimens is published by Watanabe (2017).[216]
  • A study estimating values of body weight, wing span and wing area of the trackmakers of the Cretaceous ichnotaxa Archaeornithipus meijidei, Hwangsanipes choughi and Yacoraitichnus avis is published by Tanaka (2017).[217]
  • The presence of the atlas rib in Archaeopteryx is reported for the first time by Tsuihiji (2017).[218]
  • A tooth attributed to an archaeopterygid bird is described from the Early Cretaceous of France by Louchart & Pouech (2017).[219]
  • A well-preserved skull of a juvenile specimen of Sapeornis chaoyangensis is described by Wang et al. (2017), preserving what the authors consider to be the complete dentition.[220]
  • A study on the flight capabilities of Sapeornis chaoyangensis is published by Serrano & Chiappe (2017).[221]
  • A study on the relationship between the oxygen isotope composition of bird bone phosphate and that of the drinking water of birds, as well as on implications of applying the discovered equation to Confuciusornis and to the Miocene and Pliocene penguins from Peru, is published by Amiot et al. (2017).[222]
  • A specimen of Confuciusornis sanctus with tendon- and cartilage-like tissues preserved around its ankle joint (with microstructure evident at the cellular level) is described by Jiang et al. (2017).[223]
  • A specimen of Eoconfuciusornis preserving soft-tissue traces of the ovary and wing is described by Zheng et al. (2017).[224]
  • A study on the taxonomic and morphological diversity of Early Cretaceous enantiornithines is published by Zelenkov (2017), who argues that members of the family Pengornithidae might be more closely related to Ornithuromorpha than to enantiornithines.[225]
  • A complete description of the skeletal anatomy of Chiappeavis magnapremaxillo, suggesting that rectricial bulbs were present in basal members of the enantiornithines, is published by O'Connor et al. (2017).[226]
  • A specimen of the enantiornithine Pterygornis dapingfangensis with a completely fused carpometacarpus and pelvis is described by Wang, Li & Zhou (2017), who also study the evolution of the manus and pelvis fusions in nonavian theropods, enantiornithines and ornithuromorphs.[227]
  • A bohaiornithid enantiornithine specimen with exceptionally preserved feathers, providing information on the colouration of the bird, is described from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation (China) by Peteya et al. (2017).[228]
  • Nearly half of a hatchling of an enantiornithine with preserved soft tissue is described from the Cretaceous Burmese amber by Xing et al. (2017).[229]
  • Description of the fossilized outer cones, rods, oil droplets and pigment epithelium preserved in an eye of an enantiornithine specimen from the Lower Cretaceous of China, and a study on their implications for inferring enantiornithine vision, is published by Tanaka et al. (2017).[230]
  • A new specimen of the Early Cretaceous species Archaeorhynchus spathula is described by Wang and Zhou (2017).[231]
  • An isolated tibiotarsus of a bird morphologically similar to Ichthyornis is described from the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian) of Russia by Zelenkov, Averianov & Popov (2017).[232]
  • Description of new remains of hesperornithids from several Cretaceous (Campanian) localities of the Lower Volga Region (European Russia) and a revision of the systematics of Eurasian hesperornithiforms is published by Zelenkov, Panteleyev & Yarkov (2017).[233]
  • Delphine Angst et al. find Gargantuavis philoinos in Spain, in Laño.[234]
  • A study on the species richness, taxonomic diversity and presumed ecological characteristics of the Eocene avifauna of the Messel fossil site is published by Mayr (2017).[235]
  • Revision of bird fauna from the Miocene locality of Rudabànya (Hungary) is published by Zelenkov (2017).[236]
  • Worthy et al. (2017) provide an overview of the recent advances in avian palaeobiology in New Zealand.[237]
  • A review of the Neogene birds of continental Asia is provided by Zelenkov (2017).[238]
  • Passerine and anatid fossils are described from the Miocene Tsurevsky Formation (Krasnodar Krai, Russia) by Zelenkov (2017), representing the earliest known Miocene birds from European Russia reported so far.[239]
  • A study on the isolated contour feather from the Eocene Fur Formation (Denmark), indicating presence of melanosomes similar in size and morphology to those of extant parrots, is published by Gren et al. (2017).[240]
  • A study on the nuclear genome fragments recovered from extinct elephant birds and a reconstruction of the phylogenomic timetree for the group Palaeognathae is published by Yonezawa et al. (2017).[241]
  • Ancient DNA, including mitochondrial DNA and nuclear DNA, is recovered from elephant bird eggshell by Grealy et al. (2017).[242]
  • Results of palaeontological surveys of King and Flinders Islands (Australia) undertaken in 2014 and 2015, searching for remains of the King Island emu, are presented by Hume et al. (2017).[243]
  • A revision of ratite museum fossil specimens from Argentina, indicating presence of non-rheid ratites in South America during Paleogene and Miocene, is published by Agnolin (2017).[244]
  • A study on ancient DNA recovered from late Pleistocene ratite eggshell samples from India is published by Jain et al. (2017), providing the first molecular evidence for the presence of ostriches in India.[245]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of fossil birds, focusing on resolving the relationships of giant flightless members of Galloanseres, is published by Worthy et al. (2017).[246]
  • A study on the phylogenetic relationships of Vegavis iaai, Polarornis gregorii and Australornis lovei is published by Agnolín et al. (2017), who name a new anseriform family Vegaviidae.[247]
  • New skeletal elements (limb bones) of Garganornis ballmanni are described from the Miocene of Italy by Pavia et al. (2017).[248]
  • A tarsometatarsus of a member of the anseriform genus Paranyroca is described from the late Oligocene/early Miocene of the Saint-Gérand-le-Puy area (France) by Mayr & Smith (2017), representing the first known record of the genus from the Old World.[249]
  • A study establishing criteria for assessing presence or absence of flight ability in fossil anatids, as well as assessing flight abilities of fossil anatids based on the constructed rules, is published by Watanabe (2017).[250]
  • Rawlence et al. (2017) interpret extinct New Zealand swan as a member of a distinct swan lineage divergent from modern black swan, based on ancient DNA and osteological data.[251]
  • The first Cenozoic avian body fossil from the Korean Peninsula (partial tibiotarsus of a member of the clade Galloanserae more closely related to galliforms than to anseriforms) is described from the Miocene Bukpyeong Formation (South Korea) by Park & Park (2017).[252]
  • Two parallel trackways produced by a guineafowl or a member of the family Phasianidae, rendered visible by the layer of biofilm, are described from the Pleistocene Waenhuiskrans Formation (South Africa) by Helm et al. (2017), representing the longest identified fossil avian trackways in the region.[253]
  • A revision of non-passeriform birds belonging to the group Neoaves known from the Miocene locality of Polgárdi (Hungary) is published by Zelenkov (2017).[254]
  • A study on the bone histology of the dodo (Raphus cucullatus) and its implications for the life history of members of this species is published by Angst et al. (2017).[255]
  • A study estimating the mass of the dodo is published by van Heteren et al. (2017).[256]
  • A study on the genetic diversity of the passenger pigeons based on the analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes of members of the species is published by Murray et al. (2017).[257]
  • A study on lipid residues recovered from the uropygial gland of an early Eocene bird (possibly a messelirrisorid or a close relative of the family) from the Messel pit (Germany) is published by O'Reilly et al. (2017).[258]
  • A study on the diet and trophic position of the South Island adzebill (Aptornis defossor) as indicated by bone stable isotope data is published by Wood et al. (2017).[259]
  • Partial tibiotarsus of a member of Cariamae belonging or related to the family Ameghinornithidae is described from the Eocene strata in Inner Mongolia (China) correlative to the Irdin Manha Formation by Stidham & Wang (2017).[260]
  • A study on the morphological adaptations linked to substrate preference and locomotory mode in the hindlimbs of phorusrhacids is published by Degrange (2017).[261]
  • Limb elements of a single specimen of a middle-sized terror bird are described from the Miocene of northwestern Argentina by Vezzosi & Noriega (2017), who interpret this specimen as a member of the genus Mesembriornis belonging or related to the species M. milneedwardsi.[262]
  • Restudy of the holotype specimen of the putative Miocene seriema Noriegavis santacrucensis is published by Noriega & Mayr (2017), who reinterpret this specimen as a member of the falconid genus Thegornis of uncertain specific assignment.[263]
  • Fossils of at least eight species of Pleistocene passerines are described from the Liang Bua cave on the island of Flores (Indonesia) by Meijer et al. (2017).[264]
  • A study on the paleoecology of the late Pleistocene populations of the eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) and the Hispaniolan crossbill (Loxia megaplaga) from the Bahamian island of Abaco is published by Steadman & Franklin (2017).[265][266][267]
  • Darter fossils are described from the late Pliocene Tatrot Formation (India) by Stidham et al. (2017).[268]
  • Incomplete skull of a bald ibis related to the southern bald ibis is described from the Bolt’s Farm Cave System (Cradle of Humankind, Pliocene of South Africa) by Pavia et al. (2017).[269]
  • Leg bones of a penguin comparable in size to Anthropornis nordenskjoeldi are described from the mid-Paleocene Waipara Greensand (New Zealand) by Mayr, De Pietri & Scofield (2017).[270]
  • An incomplete left tarsometatarsus of a penguin from the Late Eocene La Meseta Formation of Seymour Island, Antarctica is described by Jadwiszczak & Mörs, (2017). they report on a recently collected large-sized tarsometatarsus from this formation that represents a new morphotype. They are convinced that the morphotype corresponds to a new species, but the material is too scarce for a taxonomic act.[271]
  • A new skull of a medium-sized penguin is described from the late Eocene Submeseta Formation of Seymour Island, Antarctica by Haidr & Acosta Hospitaleche (2017), who also study the differences in proportions between skull and postcranial skeletons of Eocene and modern penguins.[272]
  • Description of new penguin fossils from different levels of the Eocene La Meseta and Submeseta formations, including the most complete beak of a penguin from Antarctica, and a study on the dietary habits of these penguins as indicated by the morphology of the mandibles and maxillary remains, is published by Haidr & Acosta Hospitaleche (2017).[273]

New taxa

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Aprosdokitos[274]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Hospitaleche, Reguero & Santillana

Eocene

La Meseta Formation Submeseta III

 Antarctica

(Seymour Island)

A penguin. The type species is A. mikrotero.

Awengkere[275]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Worthy & Yates

Late Miocene

Waite Formation

 Australia

A member of the family Anatidae. The type species is A. magnanatis.

Bubo ibericus[276]

Sp. nov

Valid

Meijer et al.

Early Pleistocene

 Spain

A horned owl.

Chupkaornis[277]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Tanaka et al.

Late Cretaceous (Coniacian to Santonian)

Kashima Formation

 Japan

A member of Hesperornithiformes. The type species is C. keraorum.

Colaptes naroskyi[278]

Sp. nov

Valid

Agnolin et Jofré

Early‐Late Pleistocene - Early‐Mid Pleistocene

Jáuregui Member

 Argentina

 Uruguay

A member of the Picidae.

Crexica[279]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Zelenkov, Panteleyev & De Pietri

Late Miocene

 Russia

A rail. Genus includes new species C. crexica.

Cruralispennia[280]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Wang et al.

Early Cretaceous (130.7 Myr ago)

Huajiying Formation

 China

A member of Enantiornithes. The type species is C. multidonta.

Deliaphaps[281]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

De Pietri et al.

Early Miocene

Bannockburn Formation

 New Zealand

A member of the family Columbidae, likely related to the Nicobar pigeon, the tooth-billed pigeon, the western crowned pigeon, the dodo and the Rodrigues solitaire. The type species is D. zealandiensis.

Diomedavus[282]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Mayr & Goedert

Late Oligocene

Lincoln Creek Formation

 United States
( Washington)

A stem-albatross. Genus includes new species D. knapptonensis.

Eocliffia[283]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Mourer-Chauviré, Pickford & Senut

Eocene (Bartonian)

Eocliff Limestone

 Namibia

A member of Charadriiformes of uncertain phylogenetic placement, related to buttonquails. The type species is E. primaeva.

Garrdimalga[284]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Shute, Prideaux & Worthy

Pleistocene

 Australia

A megapode. The type species is G. mcnamarai.

Junornis[285]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Liu et al.

Early Cretaceous

Yixian Formation

 China

A member of Enantiornithes. The type species is J. houi.

Kumimanu[286]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Mayr et al.

Paleocene (late Teurian)

Moeraki Formation

 New Zealand

An early penguin. The type species is K. biceae.

Latagallina[284]

Gen. et comb. et sp. nov

Valid

Shute, Prideaux & Worthy

Early to Late Pleistocene

 Australia

A megapode. The type species is "Progura" naracoortensis van Tets (1974); genus also includes new species L. olsoni.

Leucocarbo septentrionalis[287]

Sp. nov

Valid

Rawlence et al.

Holocene

 New Zealand

A blue-eyed shag.

Maaqwi[288]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

McLachlan, Kaiser & Longrich

Late Cretaceous (Campanian)

Northumberland Formation

 Canada
( British Columbia)

Probably a member of Vegaviidae. The type species is M. cascadensis.

Macranhinga ameghinoi[289]

Sp. nov

Valid

Diederle & Agnolin

Miocene (Colloncuran)

 Argentina

A darter.

Microenantiornis[290]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Wei & Li

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

A member of Enantiornithes. The type species is M. vulgaris.

Miocariama[263]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Noriega & Mayr

Early Miocene

Santa Cruz Formation

 Argentina

A seriema. The type species is M. patagonica.

Miohypotaenidia[279]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Zelenkov, Panteleyev & De Pietri

Late Miocene

 Russia

A rail. Genus includes new species M. tanaisensis.

Opisthodactylus kirchneri[291]

Sp. nov

Valid

Noriega et al.

Late Miocene

Andalhuala Formation

 Argentina

A member of the family Rheidae.

Pampagyps[292]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Agnolin et al.

Lujanian

 Argentina

A New World vulture. The type species is P. imperator.

Piscivorenantiornis[293]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Wang & Zhou

Early Cretaceous

Jiufotang Formation

 China

A member of Enantiornithes. The type species is P. inusitatus.

Progura campestris[284]

Sp. nov

Valid

Shute, Prideaux & Worthy

Pleistocene

 Australia

A megapode.

Pyrrhula crassa[294]

Sp. nov

Valid

Rando et al.

Holocene

 Azores

A bullfinch.

Sylvosimadaravis[236]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Zelenkov

Late Miocene

 Hungary

Type species is "Certhia" janossyi Kessler et Hír, 2012 and it is placed in the superfamily Sylvioidea.

Tsidiiyazhi[295]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Ksepka, Stidham & Williamson

Early Paleocene

Nacimiento Formation

 United States
( New Mexico)

A stem-mousebird belonging to the family Sandcoleidae. The type species is T. abini.

Vanolimicola[296]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Mayr

Early Eocene

Messel pit

 Germany

A bird of uncertain phylogenetic placement with a shorebird-like beak. The type species is V. longihallucis.

Pterosaurs

Research

  • A study on the body size evolution in pterosaurs, especially on whether Bergmann's rule can be shown to apply to pterosaurs, is published by Villalobos et al. (2017).[297]
  • A study on the occurrence of competition and ecological separation between pterosaurs and birds as indicated by analyses of functionally equivalent morphological characters of lower jaw, fore- and hindlimbs is published by Chan (2017).[298]
  • A study on the differences between soft-tissue structure and attachments articulating skeletal joints of Rhamphorhynchus and Pterodactylus as indicated by known skeletons of members of both taxa is published by Beardmore, Lawlor & Hone (2017).[299]
  • Pterosaur manus tracks are described from the Late Cretaceous of Morocco by Masrour et al. (2017).[300]
  • A study on the systematic relationships of Parapsicephalus purdoni is published by O'Sullivan & Martill (2017).[301]
  • A study on the differences in the anatomy of the skull crests in wukongopterid pterosaur specimens and its implications for the function of these crests is published by Cheng et al. (2017).[302]
  • New specimen of Kunpengopterus sinensis, providing new information on the anatomy of members of the species, is described from the Upper Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation (China) by Cheng et al. (2017).[303]
  • An accumulation of hundreds of eggs (some of which contain embryonic remains) of Hamipterus tianshanensis is reported from the Lower Cretaceous of China by Wang et al. (2017), who interpret the finding as evidence of colonial nesting and potential nesting site fidelity in pterosaurs, and argue that the hatchlings might have been flightless and not as precocial as previously thought.[304]
  • Isolated teeth belonging to indeterminate members of the clade Anhangueria are described from the Early Cretaceous (Albian) Griman Creek Formation (Australia) by Brougham, Smith & Bell (2017).[305]
  • A study on the morphological diversity of the skulls of anhanguerids from the Lower Cretaceous Romualdo Formation (Brazil) and its implications for the taxonomy of members of the genus Anhanguera is published by Pinheiro & Rodrigues (2017).[306]
  • A redescription of the holotype specimen of Dawndraco kanzai is published by Martin-Silverstone et al. (2017), who consider this species to be a junior synonym of Pteranodon sternbergi.[307][308][309]
  • A redescription of the holotype specimen of Jidapterus edentus and a study on the taxonomic validity, phylogenetic relationships and paleoecology of the species is published by Wu, Zhou & Andres (2017).[310]
  • Funston, Martin-Silverstone & Currie (2017) describe a fossil specimen from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Dinosaur Park Formation (Canada), interpreted as a partial pterosaur pelvis (tentatively referred to Azhdarchidae), which if confirmed would represent the first described pelvic material from a North American azhdarchid;[311] however, this specimen is subsequently reinterpreted as a broken tyrannosaurid squamosal.[312]
  • A description of a neck vertebra of a probable member of the genus Hatzegopteryx recovered from the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Sebeş Formation (Romania) and a study on the implications of the vertebra's anatomy for the neck length and ecology of Hatzegopteryx is published by Naish & Witton (2017).[313]
  • Fragments of neck vertebra of a gigantic pterosaur are described from the Upper Cretaceous Nemegt Formation (Mongolia) by Tsuihiji et al. (2017).[314]

New taxa

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Altmuehlopterus[315]

Gen. et comb. nov

Valid

Vidovic & Martill

Late Jurassic

Mörnsheim Limestone Formation

 Germany

A pterodactyloid pterosaur; a new genus for "Germanodactylus" rhamphastinus (Wagner, 1851).

Argentinadraco[316]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Kellner & Calvo

Late Cretaceous (Turonian-Coniacian)

Portezuelo Formation

 Argentina

A member of Azhdarchoidea, possibly an azhdarchid. The type species is A. barrealensis.

Douzhanopterus[317]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Wang et al.

Late Jurassic

Tiaojishan Formation

 China

A non-pterodactyloid monofenestratan. The type species is D. zhengi.

Liaodactylus[318]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Zhou et al.

Late Jurassic (Oxfordian)

Tiaojishan Formation

 China

A member of Ctenochasmatidae. The type species is L. primus.

Other archosaurs

Research

New taxa

Name Novelty Status Authors Age Unit Location Notes Images

Teleocrater[320]

Gen. et sp. nov

Valid

Nesbitt et al.

Middle Triassic

Manda Beds

 Tanzania

An early member of Avemetatarsalia belonging to the newly named group Aphanosauria. The type species is T. rhadinus.

References

  1. ^ Alejandro Otero; Vivian Allen; Diego Pol; John R. Hutchinson (2017). "Forelimb muscle and joint actions in Archosauria: insights from Crocodylus johnstoni (Pseudosuchia) and Mussaurus patagonicus (Sauropodomorpha)". PeerJ. 5: e3976. doi:10.7717/peerj.3976. PMC 5703147. PMID 29188140.
  2. ^ F. Clarac; V. De Buffrénil; C. Brochu; J. Cubo (2017). "The evolution of bone ornamentation in Pseudosuchia: morphological constraints versus ecological adaptation". Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 121 (2): 395–408. doi:10.1093/biolinnean/blw034.
  3. ^ Agustina Lecuona; Julia B. Desojo; Diego Pol (2017). "New information on the postcranial skeleton of Gracilisuchus stipanicicorum (Archosauria: Suchia) and reappraisal of its phylogenetic position". Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society. 181 (3): 638–677. doi:10.1093/zoolinnean/zlx011.
  4. ^ Torsten M. Scheyer; Hans-Dieter Sues (2017). "Expanded dorsal ribs in the Late Triassic pseudosuchian reptile Euscolosuchus olseni". Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. 37 (1): e1248768. doi:10.1080/02724634.2017.1248768.
  5. ^ Sterling Nesbitt; Julia B. Desojo (2017). "The osteology and phylogenetic position of Luperosuchus fractus (Archosauria: Loricata) from the latest Middle Triassic or earliest Late Triassic of Argentina". Ameghiniana. 54 (3): 261–282. doi:10.5710/AMGH.09.04.2017.3059.
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Aepyornithomimus

Aepyornithomimus (meaning "Aepyornis mimic") is a genus of ornithomimid theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Djadokhta Formation in Mongolia. It lived in the Campanian, around 80 million years ago, when the area is thought to have been a desert. The type and only species is A. tugrikinensis.

Afromimus

Afromimus (meaning "Africa mimic") is a genus of ornithomimosaurian theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Elrhaz Formation of Niger. It contains a single species, A. tenerensis, named in 2017 by Paul Sereno from parts of the right leg, vertebrae, and ribs found in the Ténéré Desert.

Albertavenator

Albertavenator is a genus of small troodontid theropod dinosaur, known from the early Maastrichtian in the Cretaceous period. It contains a single species, A. curriei, named after paleontologist Phil Currie, based on a partial left frontal found in the Horseshoe Canyon Formation of Alberta. Albertavenator's discovery indicates that small dinosaur diversity may be underestimated at present due to the difficulty in identifying species from fragmentary remains.

Almas ukhaa

Almas is a genus of troodontid theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Mongolia. It contains a single species, Almas ukhaa, named in 2017 by Pei Rui and colleagues, based on a partial articulated skeleton. The only known specimen was found in the Djadochta Formation, which is late Campanian in age.

Bonapartesaurus

Bonapartesaurus is an extinct genus of herbivorous ornithopod dinosaur belonging to Hadrosauridae, which lived in the area of the modern Argentina during the Campanian and Maastrichtian stages of the Late Cretaceous.

Burianosaurus

Burianosaurus is a genus of ornithopod dinosaur that lived in what is now the Czech Republic (it was found in 2003 near the city of Kutná Hora), being the first validly named dinosaur from that country. It was named B. augustai in 2017; the genus name honours the Czech palaeoartist Zdeněk Burian, and the species name honours the Czech palaeontologist Josef Augusta. The holotype specimen is a femur discovered in 2003, which was described as possibly belonging to an iguanodont in 2005.

Chenanisaurus

Chenanisaurus barbaricus is a species of predatory abelisaurid theropod dinosaur from the upper Maastrichtian phosphates of the Ouled Abdoun Basin in Morocco, North Africa. It is known from a holotype consisting of a partial dentary and four teeth and a few isolated teeth attributed to it.

Corythoraptor

Corythoraptor (meaning "crested raptor") is a genus of crested oviraptorid theropod dinosaur from the Nanxiong Formation of China. It is known from one species, C. jacobsi, named after palaeontologist Louis L. Jacobs. Including it, there are seven oviraptorids known from the Nanxiong Formation, showing a high level of diversity in the area, and that the different taxa may have occupied different ecological niches.

Europatitan

Europatitan is a genus of somphospondylan sauropod from the Early Cretaceous Castrillo de la Reina Formation of Iberia, known from a relatively completely specimen discovered in the early 2000s. It contains a single species, E. eastwoodi, named after actor and director Clint Eastwood.

Isaberrysaura

Isaberrysaura is a genus of ornithischian dinosaur from the Early Jurassic Los Molles Formation of Patagonia, Argentina. The genus contains a single species, I. mollensis, described by Salgado et al. in 2017 from a single specimen. Although initially classified as a basal neornithischian, subsequent analysis has allied it with the Stegosauria; the morphology of its skull resembles those of other members of the group.

Latenivenatrix

Latenivenatrix (meaning "hiding hunter") is a genus of troodontid known from one species, L. mcmasterae, described in 2017 from remains formerly identified as Troodon. With an estimated skull length of 45 centimetres (18 in) and a full body length of 3–3.5 metres (9.8–11.5 ft), Latenivenatrix is the largest troodontid known.

Lucianovenator

Lucianovenator is an extinct genus of coelophysoid theropod dinosaur which lived in Argentina during the Triassic. The genus name Lucianovenator translates to "Luciano's hunter", in reference Don Luciano Leyes, who first reported the remains. The species name bonoi refers to Tulio del Bono, a local scientific authority who collaborated on the describers' research. It is one of the few neotheropods known from South America.

Moabosaurus

Moabosaurus (meaning "Moab reptile") is a genus of turiasaurian sauropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah, United States.

Pandoravenator

Pandoravenator is a genus of basal tetanuran theropod from the Late Jurassic of central Patagonia. It contains one species, P. fernandezorum.

Powellvenator

Powellvenator is an extinct genus of coelophysoid theropod dinosaur that lived during the latter part of the Triassic Period in what is now northwestern Argentina in the Los Colorados Formation. The type species, Powellvenator podocitus, was named by Martin Ezcurra in 2017.

Shingopana

Shingopana (meaning "wide neck" in Swahili) is a genus of titanosaurian sauropod from the Middle Cretaceous Galula Formation of Tanzania. It is known from only the type species, S. songwensis. Gorsak & O'Conner's phylogentic testing suggest Shingopana is more closely related to the South American titanosaur family of Aeolosaurini than any of the titanosaurs found so far in North & South Africa.

Soriatitan

Soriatitan ("Soria titan") is a genus of brachiosaurid sauropod from the Early Cretaceous of Spain. It is known from one species, S. golmayensis, found in the Golmayo Formation. It lived between 130 to 138 million years ago was identified by a team of paleontologists in Spain.

Vouivria

Vouivria is a genus of herbivorous sauropod dinosaurs, belonging to the Brachiosauridae, that lived in the area of present France during the Late Jurassic. The type species is Vouivria damparisensis.

Zhongjianosaurus

Zhongjianosaurus is a genus of dromaeosaurid belonging to the Microraptoria. Believed to hail from the Yixian Formation, specifically the middle of the Jehol Biota, it is the smallest known microraptorine thus far discovered and one of the smallest non-avian theropod dinosaurs.

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