2017 UEFA Europa League Final

The 2017 UEFA Europa League Final was the final match of the 2016–17 UEFA Europa League, the 46th season of Europe's secondary club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 8th season since it was renamed from the UEFA Cup to the UEFA Europa League. It was played at the Friends Arena in Solna, Stockholm, Sweden on 24 May 2017,[5] between Dutch side Ajax and English side Manchester United. Manchester United won the match 2–0 to secure their first title in this competition.[6] With this victory, they joined Juventus, Ajax, Bayern Munich and Chelsea as the only clubs to have won all three major European trophies (European Champion Clubs' Cup/UEFA Champions League, UEFA Cup/Europa League, and the now-defunct Cup Winners' Cup).[7]

Manchester United earned the right to play against the winners of the 2016–17 UEFA Champions League, Real Madrid, in the 2017 UEFA Super Cup. They also entered the group stage of the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League, as the berth reserved for the Champions League title holders was not used.[8] Police of Stockholm took measures against potential terrorist attacks which they described as "the new normality", since two had occurred in Stockholm in 2010 and just a month before the final, and also prepared for potential clashes between supporters.[9]

2017 UEFA Europa League Final
2017 UEFA Europa League Final logo2
Match programme cover
Event2016–17 UEFA Europa League
Ajax Manchester United
Netherlands England
0 2
Date24 May 2017
VenueFriends Arena, Solna, Stockholm
Man of the MatchAnder Herrera (Manchester United)[1]
RefereeDamir Skomina (Slovenia)[2]
Attendance46,961[3]
WeatherPartly cloudy
19 °C (66 °F)
44% humidity[4]

Teams

In the following table, finals until 2009 were in the UEFA Cup era, since 2010 were in the UEFA Europa League era.

Team Previous finals appearances (bold indicates winners)
Netherlands Ajax 1 (1992)
England Manchester United None

Venue

Friends Arena from inside
The Friends Arena in Solna hosted the final

The Friends Arena was announced as the final venue on 30 June 2015, following the decision of the UEFA Executive Committee meeting in Prague, Czech Republic.[5]

Background

This was Ajax's second final in the UEFA Cup/Europa League, having won in the 1992 UEFA Cup Final over Torino on away goals.[10]

This was Manchester United's first final in the UEFA Cup/Europa League. They were seeking to join Juventus, Ajax, Bayern Munich and Chelsea as the only clubs to have won all three major European trophies (European Champion Clubs' Cup/UEFA Champions League, UEFA Cup/Europa League, and the now defunct UEFA Cup Winners' Cup).[7][11]

The two sides had previously met four times in European competitions, all in the UEFA Cup/Europa League, with a record of two wins each. However, Manchester United had eliminated Ajax on both occasions, 2–1 on aggregate in the 1976–77 UEFA Cup first round, and 3–2 on aggregate in the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League round of 32.[12][13]

Road to the final

Note: In the table, the score of the finalist is given first (H = home; A = away).

Netherlands Ajax[14] Round England Manchester United[15]
Champions League Europa League
Opponent Agg. 1st leg 2nd leg Qualifying phase (CL, EL) Bye
Greece PAOK 3–2 1–1 (H) 2–1 (A) Third qualifying round
Russia Rostov 2–5 1–1 (H) 1–4 (A) Play-off round
Europa League
Opponent Result Group stage Opponent Result
Greece Panathinaikos 2–1 (A) Matchday 1 Netherlands Feyenoord 0–1 (A)
Belgium Standard Liège 1–0 (H) Matchday 2 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk 1–0 (H)
Spain Celta Vigo 2–2 (A) Matchday 3 Turkey Fenerbahçe 4–1 (H)
Spain Celta Vigo 3–2 (H) Matchday 4 Turkey Fenerbahçe 1–2 (A)
Greece Panathinaikos 2–0 (H) Matchday 5 Netherlands Feyenoord 4–0 (H)
Belgium Standard Liège 1–1 (A) Matchday 6 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk 2–0 (A)
Group G winners
Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Netherlands Ajax 6 14
2 Spain Celta Vigo 6 9
3 Belgium Standard Liège 6 7
4 Greece Panathinaikos 6 1
Source: UEFA
Final standings Group A runners-up
Pos Team Pld Pts
1 Turkey Fenerbahçe 6 13
2 England Manchester United 6 12
3 Netherlands Feyenoord 6 7
4 Ukraine Zorya Luhansk 6 2
Source: UEFA
Opponent Agg. 1st leg 2nd leg Knockout phase Opponent Agg. 1st leg 2nd leg
Poland Legia Warsaw 1–0 0–0 (A) 1–0 (H) Round of 32 France Saint-Étienne 4–0 3–0 (H) 1–0 (A)
Denmark Copenhagen 3–2 1–2 (A) 2–0 (H) Round of 16 Russia Rostov 2–1 1–1 (A) 1–0 (H)
Germany Schalke 04 4–3 2–0 (H) 2–3 (a.e.t.) (A) Quarter-finals Belgium Anderlecht 3–2 1–1 (A) 2–1 (a.e.t.) (H)
France Lyon 5–4 4–1 (H) 1–3 (A) Semi-finals Spain Celta Vigo 2–1 1–0 (A) 1–1 (H)

Pre-match

Ambassador

The ambassador for the final was former Swedish international player Patrik Andersson, who won the Champions League with Bayern Munich against Valencia in 2001.[16]

UEFA unveiled the brand identity of the final on 26 August 2016 in Monaco during the group stage draw.[17]

Ticketing

With a stadium capacity of 48,000 for the final, a total amount of 37,000 tickets were available to fans and the general public, with the two finalist teams receiving 10,000 tickets each and with 17,000 tickets being available for sale to fans worldwide via UEFA.com from 17 to 28 March 2017 in four price categories: €150, €100, €70, and €45. The remaining tickets were allocated to the local organising committee, UEFA and national associations, commercial partners and broadcasters, and to serve the corporate hospitality programme.[18]

Opening ceremony

A minute's silence was observed before the final in memory to victims of the bombing in Manchester which occurred two days before the final; the opening ceremony was thus considerably reduced.[19]

Match

2017 UEFA Europa League Final first half
The players during the first half of the game.

Officials

Slovenian referee Damir Skomina was announced as the final referee by UEFA on 12 May 2017.[2]

Summary

Paul Pogba opened the scoring for Manchester United in the 18th minute when his low left foot shot from just outside the penalty area took a deflection off Davinson Sánchez which wrong footed the goalkeeper before looping over him and into the net.[20][21] Henrikh Mkhitaryan got the second goal three minutes into the second half when with his back to goal he flicked the ball into the net with his right foot from three yards out after the ball had been knocked down to him by Chris Smalling after a corner from the right by Juan Mata.[22]

Details

The "home" team (for administrative purposes) was determined by an additional draw held after the semi-final draw, which was held on 21 April 2017 at UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland.[23]

Ajax Netherlands0–2England Manchester United
Report
Ajax[4]
Manchester United[4]
GK 24 Cameroon André Onana
RB 3 Netherlands Joël Veltman Yellow card 58'
CB 5 Colombia Davinson Sánchez
CB 36 Netherlands Matthijs de Ligt
LB 4 Netherlands Jaïro Riedewald Yellow card 78' Substituted off 82'
CM 10 Netherlands Davy Klaassen (c)
CM 20 Denmark Lasse Schöne Substituted off 70'
CM 22 Morocco Hakim Ziyech
RF 9 Burkina Faso Bertrand Traoré
CF 25 Denmark Kasper Dolberg Substituted off 62'
LF 11 Germany Amin Younes Yellow card 64'
Substitutes:
GK 33 Netherlands Diederik Boer
DF 2 Netherlands Kenny Tete
DF 16 Germany Heiko Westermann
MF 21 Netherlands Frenkie de Jong Substituted in 82'
MF 30 Netherlands Donny van de Beek Substituted in 70'
FW 45 Netherlands Justin Kluivert
FW 77 Brazil David Neres Substituted in 62'
Manager:
Netherlands Peter Bosz
Ajax vs Man Utd 2017-05-24
GK 20 Argentina Sergio Romero
RB 25 Ecuador Antonio Valencia (c)
CB 12 England Chris Smalling
CB 17 Netherlands Daley Blind
LB 36 Italy Matteo Darmian
DM 21 Spain Ander Herrera
RM 8 Spain Juan Mata Yellow card 78' Substituted off 90'
CM 27 Belgium Marouane Fellaini Yellow card 52'
CM 6 France Paul Pogba
LM 22 Armenia Henrikh Mkhitaryan Yellow card 31' Substituted off 74'
CF 19 England Marcus Rashford Substituted off 84'
Substitutes:
GK 1 Spain David de Gea
DF 4 England Phil Jones
DF 24 Netherlands Timothy Fosu-Mensah
MF 14 England Jesse Lingard Substituted in 74'
MF 16 England Michael Carrick
FW 10 England Wayne Rooney Substituted in 90'
FW 11 France Anthony Martial Substituted in 84'
Manager:
Portugal José Mourinho

Man of the Match:
Ander Herrera (Manchester United)[1]

Assistant referees:[2]
Jure Praprotnik (Slovenia)
Robert Vukan (Slovenia)
Fourth official:[2]
Gianluca Rocchi (Italy)
Additional assistant referees:[2]
Matej Jug (Slovenia)
Slavko Vinčić (Slovenia)
Reserve assistant referee:[2]
Tomaž Klančnik (Slovenia)

Match rules[24]

  • 90 minutes.
  • 30 minutes of extra time if necessary.
  • Penalty shoot-out if scores still level.
  • Seven named substitutes, of which up to three may be used.

Statistics

First half[25]
Statistic Ajax Manchester United
Goals scored 0 1
Total shots 6 4
Shots on target 1 2
Saves 1 1
Ball possession 66% 34%
Corner kicks 2 0
Fouls committed 6 9
Offsides 0 1
Yellow cards 0 1
Red cards 0 0
Second half[25]
Statistic Ajax Manchester United
Goals scored 0 1
Total shots 11 2
Shots on target 2 2
Saves 1 2
Ball possession 67% 33%
Corner kicks 3 2
Fouls committed 9 8
Offsides 0 0
Yellow cards 3 2
Red cards 0 0
Overall[25]
Statistic Ajax Manchester United
Goals scored 0 2
Total shots 17 6
Shots on target 3 4
Saves 2 3
Ball possession 67% 33%
Corner kicks 5 2
Fouls committed 15 17
Offsides 0 1
Yellow cards 3 3
Red cards 0 0

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Herrera named man of the match". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 17 February 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Damir Skomina to referee Europa League final". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 12 May 2017. Retrieved 13 May 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Full Time Report Final – Ajax v Manchester United" (PDF). UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  4. ^ a b c "Tactical Lineups – Final – Wednesday 24 May 2017" (PDF). UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  5. ^ a b "Solna to host 2017 UEFA Europa League final". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 30 June 2015. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  6. ^ "Manchester United's Paul Pogba sets up Europa League final win over Ajax". Guardian. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  7. ^ a b "Ajax 0 Manchester United 2". BBC Sport. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  8. ^ "Champions League group place on offer for Ajax or Manchester United". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 22 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  9. ^ "Polisen redo för Europa League-finalen efter dådet i Manchester – Nyheter (Ekot)". Sveriges Radio (in Swedish). Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  10. ^ "#UELfinal, Ajax v Man. United: all you need to know". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 11 May 2017.
  11. ^ "Manchester United aiming for European clean sweep". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 11 May 2017.
  12. ^ "Ajax v Manchester United: the past meetings". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 18 May 2017.
  13. ^ "Match Press Kit" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  14. ^ "Story so far: Europa League finalists Ajax". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 20 May 2017.
  15. ^ "Story so far: Europa League finalists Manchester United". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 22 May 2017.
  16. ^ "Patrik Andersson the face of Stockholm final". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 23 August 2016.
  17. ^ "Stockholm 2017 final identity revealed". UEFA.org. 26 August 2016.
  18. ^ "Tickets for 2017 UEFA Europa League final in Stockholm on sale". UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 17 March 2017.
  19. ^ "Minute's silence at UEFA Europa League final". UEFA. 23 May 2017.
  20. ^ "Manchester United beat Ajax to claim Europa League title". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  21. ^ "Live Man Utd win Europa League – reaction and latest as Jose Mourinho's side qualify for Champions League". The Telegraph. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  22. ^ "Ajax 0 Manchester United 2: As it happened". Guardian. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  23. ^ "UEFA Europa League semi-final draw". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  24. ^ "Regulations of the UEFA Europa League 2016/17 Season" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 26 June 2016.
  25. ^ a b c "Team statistics" (PDF). UEFA.org. Union of European Football Associations. 24 May 2017. Retrieved 24 May 2017.

External links

2016–17 Manchester United F.C. season

The 2016–17 season was Manchester United's 25th season in the Premier League, and their 42nd consecutive season in the top-flight of English football. It began against Leicester City in the FA Community Shield, with United prevailing 2–1 to win the first trophy of the domestic calendar. In February 2017, the club won their second trophy of the campaign, beating Southampton 3–2 in the EFL Cup Final. Although they missed out on qualifying for the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League via the league, having finished in sixth place, a 2–0 victory over Ajax in the 2017 UEFA Europa League Final meant they qualified for the Champions League group stage as Europa League title holders. The triumph made United became the fifth team to have won all three European main club trophies.

Following the departure of Louis van Gaal at the end of the previous season, the club signed former Porto, Chelsea, Inter Milan and Real Madrid manager José Mourinho on a three-year contract, with the option of a further year.

2016–17 UEFA Europa League

The 2016–17 UEFA Europa League was the 46th season of Europe's secondary club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the eighth season since it was renamed from the UEFA Cup to the UEFA Europa League.

The final was played between Ajax and Manchester United at the Friends Arena in Solna, Sweden. Manchester United beat Ajax 2–0 to win their first title. With this victory, they became the fifth club – after Juventus, Ajax, Bayern Munich and Chelsea – to have won all three major European trophies (European Champion Clubs' Cup/UEFA Champions League, UEFA Cup/UEFA Europa League, and the now-defunct Cup Winners' Cup).Manchester United qualified for the 2017–18 UEFA Champions League, and also earned the right to play against the winners of the 2016–17 UEFA Champions League, Real Madrid, in the 2017 UEFA Super Cup.

As the title holders, Sevilla qualified for the 2016–17 UEFA Champions League. Winning the last three tournaments, Sevilla were unable to defend their titles after reaching the competition's knockout stage.

2017 UEFA Champions League Final

The 2017 UEFA Champions League Final was the final match of the 2016–17 UEFA Champions League, the 62nd season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 25th season since it was renamed from the European Champion Clubs' Cup to the UEFA Champions League. It was played at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, Wales on 3 June 2017, between Italian side Juventus and Spanish side and title holders Real Madrid, in a repeat of the 1998 final. Real Madrid won the match 4–1 to secure their 12th title in this competition. With this victory, as the defending champions, Real Madrid became the first ever team to successfully defend their title in the Champions League era, and the first to do so since Milan in 1990. On the other hand, Juventus lost a fifth final in a row and a seventh in nine finals reached.

Real Madrid qualified as the UEFA representative at the 2017 FIFA Club World Cup in the United Arab Emirates, and also earned the right to play against the winners of the 2016–17 UEFA Europa League, Manchester United, in the 2017 UEFA Super Cup.

2017 UEFA Super Cup

The 2017 UEFA Super Cup was the 42nd edition of the UEFA Super Cup, an annual football match organised by UEFA and contested by the reigning champions of the two main European club competitions, the UEFA Champions League and the UEFA Europa League. The match featured Spanish side Real Madrid, the title holders and winners of the 2016–17 UEFA Champions League, and English side Manchester United, the winners of the 2016–17 UEFA Europa League. The match was played at the Philip II Arena in Skopje, Macedonia, on 8 August 2017, and was the first UEFA final staged in the country.Real Madrid won the match 2–1 for their second consecutive and fourth overall UEFA Super Cup title.

2017–18 Bundesliga

The 2017–18 Bundesliga was the 55th season of the Bundesliga, Germany's premier football competition. It began on 18 August 2017 and concluded on 12 May 2018. The fixtures were announced on 29 June 2017.Following an offline test phase in the previous season, the video assistant referee system was used for the first time in the Bundesliga on a trial basis following approval from IFAB.Bayern Munich were the defending champions and won their 27th Bundesliga title on 7 April with five games to spare, winning a sixth consecutive title for the first time in their history.1. FC Köln and Hamburger SV were relegated at the end of the season, with the latter therefore losing their status as the only ever-presents in Bundesliga history.

2019 UEFA Champions League Final

The 2019 UEFA Champions League Final was the final match of the 2018–19 UEFA Champions League, the 64th season of Europe's premier club football tournament organised by UEFA, and the 27th season since it was rebranded the UEFA Champions League. It was played at the Wanda Metropolitano in Madrid, Spain on 1 June 2019, between English sides Tottenham Hotspur, in their first European Cup final, and Liverpool, in their ninth final overall and their second in a row, having been defeated by Real Madrid in 2018. It was the seventh Champions League final – and the fourth of the decade – to feature two teams from the same association, and the second all-English final after 2008. It was also the first final since 2013 to not feature at least one Spanish team, with Real Madrid and Barcelona having shared the previous five titles between them.

Liverpool won the final 2–0, with a penalty which was converted after 106 seconds by Mohamed Salah and a strike by substitute Divock Origi after 87 minutes. As winners, for the sixth time overall and the first time since 2005, Liverpool earned the right to play in the 2019 FIFA Club World Cup, as well as against Chelsea, the winners of the 2018–19 UEFA Europa League, in the 2019 UEFA Super Cup. They were to also qualify to enter the group stage of the 2019–20 UEFA Champions League. However, as Liverpool already qualified through their league position, the reserved berth was given to the champions of the 2018–19 Austrian Bundesliga, the 11th-ranked association according to next season's access list.In March 2018, UEFA announced that a fourth substitution would be allowed in extra time and that the number of substitutes would be increased from 7 to 12. The kick-off time was also changed from 20:45 CEST to 21:00 CEST. The match was also the first Champions League final to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

AFC Ajax

Amsterdamsche Football Club Ajax (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈaːjɑks]), also known as AFC Ajax, Ajax Amsterdam or simply Ajax, is a Dutch professional football club based in Amsterdam, that plays in the Eredivisie, the top tier in Dutch football. Historically, Ajax (named after the legendary Greek hero) has been the most successful club in the Netherlands, with 34 Eredivisie titles and 19 KNVB Cups. It has continuously played in the Eredivisie, since the league's inception in 1956 and, along with Feyenoord and PSV Eindhoven, it is one of the country's "big three" clubs that have dominated that competition.

Ajax has historically been one of the most successful clubs in the world. According to the IFFHS, Ajax were the seventh-most successful European club of the 20th century and The World's Club Team of the Year in 1992. According to German magazine Kicker, Ajax were the second-most successful European club of the 20th century. The club is one of the five teams that has earned the right to keep the European Cup and to wear a multiple-winner badge; they won consecutively in 1971–1973. In 1972, they completed the continental treble by winning the Eredivisie, KNVB Cup, and the European Cup. It also won the first organized UEFA Super Cup in 1972 against Glasgow Rangers (played in 1973). Ajax's last international trophies were the 1995 Intercontinental Cup, 1995 UEFA Super Cup and the 1995 Champions League, where they defeated Milan in the final; they lost the 1996 Champions League final on penalties to Juventus. In 1995, Ajax was crowned as World Team of the Year by World Soccer magazine.

Ajax is also one of four teams to win the continental treble and the Intercontinental Cup or Club World Cup in the same season/calendar year; This was achieved in the 1971–72 season. Ajax, Juventus, Bayern Munich, Chelsea and Manchester United are the five clubs to have won all three major UEFA club competitions. They have also won the Intercontinental Cup twice, the 1991–92 UEFA Cup, as well as the Karl Rappan Cup, a predecessor of the UEFA Intertoto Cup in 1962. Ajax plays at the Johan Cruyff Arena, which opened as the Amsterdam ArenA in 1996 and was renamed in 2018. They previously played at De Meer Stadion and the Amsterdam Olympic Stadium (for international matches).

Ander Herrera

Ander Herrera Agüera (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈandeɾ eˈreɾa aˈɣweɾa]; born 14 August 1989) is a Spanish professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for Ligue 1 club Paris Saint-Germain.

He began his career at Real Zaragoza, before moving to Athletic Bilbao in 2011 and then to Manchester United for €36 million in 2014. He has won four trophies with the club, including the FA Cup, EFL Cup and UEFA Europa League, and was named as their player of the year for the 2016–17 season.

He has also won tournaments with Spain at under-20 and under-21 level and represented the nation at the 2012 Olympics. He made his senior international debut in November 2016.

Anthony Martial

Anthony Jordan Martial (French pronunciation: ​[maʁsjal]; born 5 December 1995) is a French professional footballer who plays as a forward for Premier League club Manchester United and the France national team. He was the recipient of the 2015 Golden Boy Award for the best under-21 player in Europe.Playing youth football for Les Ulis, he began his professional career at Lyon, then transferred to AS Monaco in 2013 for a fee of €6 million. He was a member of Monaco's squad for two seasons, and signed for Manchester United in 2015 for an initial fee of £36 million which could potentially rise to £57.6 million. This was the highest fee paid for a teenager in football history even before the potential increase. He scored in his first match for United, and was named the Premier League Player of the Month in his first month in English football.

A youth international for France from under-16 to under-21 level, Martial made his senior debut in 2015. He was named in their squad for UEFA Euro 2016.

Antonio Valencia

Luis Antonio Valencia Mosquera, known as Antonio Valencia (Spanish pronunciation: [anˈtonjo βaˈlensja]; born 4 August 1985), is an Ecuadorian professional footballer who plays for L.D.U. Quito and the Ecuador national team. Primarily a right-back, he had previously played as a right winger for a large duration of his career.

After progressing through the youth system at El Nacional, Valencia became a first team regular and made over 80 appearances for the club. He won the Ecuadorian Serie A with them before signing for La Liga side Villarreal in 2005. He only made two league appearances for the Spanish side in between loan spells at Recreativo for the 2005–06 season and later English Premier League club Wigan Athletic from 2006 to 2008. Wigan Athletic later signed Valencia on a three-year deal for an undisclosed fee in January 2008. His performances for Wigan Athletic soon attracted attention from several high-profile clubs, eventually signing for Manchester United in June 2009. Valencia has since won two Premier League titles, an FA Cup, two League Cups, the UEFA Europa League and three FA Community Shields. Valencia was voted into the PFA Team of the Year in his debut season with the club.

Valencia made his Ecuador debut in 2004 and has represented his country at the 2006 FIFA World Cup, the 2007 Copa América, the 2011 Copa América, the 2014 FIFA World Cup, the Copa América Centenario and the 2019 Copa América. Since making his debut, Valencia has won over 90 caps and scored 11 goals for his country.

Damir Skomina

Damir Skomina (born 5 August 1976) is a UEFA Elite category football referee from Slovenia.

Friends Arena

Friends Arena (Swedish pronunciation: [frɛn(d)s a²reːna]), also known as Nationalarenan, is a retractable roof multi-purpose stadium in Stockholm, Sweden. Located next to the lake Råstasjön in Solna, just north of the City Centre, it is the biggest stadium in Scandinavia. Since its opening, the venue has served as Sweden's national stadium for men's football, hence its name. The main tenants of the stadium are Sweden's men's national football team and Allsvenskan football club AIK; both relocated from their previous home at the Råsunda Stadium. The venue has a total capacity of 65,000 at concerts and 50,000 seated at football matches, but the stadium can be scaled down to provide for smaller events with approximately 20,000 guests.

History of AFC Ajax

AFC Ajax is one of the most successful clubs in Dutch football. Historically, Ajax is the most successful club in the Netherlands, with 34 Eredivisie titles and 19 KNVB Cups.

Ajax is historically one of the most successful clubs in the world; according to the IFFHS, Ajax were the seventh-most successful European club of the 20th century. The club is one of the five teams that has earned the right to keep the European Cup and to wear a multiple-winner badge; they won consecutively in 1971–1973. In 1972, they completed the continental treble by winning the Eredivisie, KNVB Cup, and the European Cup. Ajax's last international trophies were the 1995 Intercontinental Cup and the 1995 Champions League, where they defeated Milan in the final; they lost the 1996 Champions League final on penalties to Juventus.

Ajax is also one of three teams to win the continental treble and the Intercontinental Cup in the same season/calendar year; This was achieved in the 1971–72 season. Ajax, Juventus, Bayern Munich and Chelsea are the four clubs to have won all three major UEFA club competitions. They have also won the Intercontinental Cup twice, the 1991–92 UEFA Cup, as well as the Karl Rappan Cup, a predecessor of the UEFA Intertoto Cup, in 1962. Ajax plays at the Amsterdam Arena, which opened in 1996. They previously played at De Meer Stadion and the Amsterdam Olympic Stadium (for international matches).

List of European stadiums by capacity

This is a list of the largest European stadiums. Stadiums with a capacity of 25,000 or more are included. The list includes stadiums in Europe and in countries that normally take part in European sporting competitions.

They are ordered by their audience capacity. The capacity figures are for each stadium's permanent total capacity, including seating and any official standing areas. The capacity does include movable seating - used by multi-purpose stadiums to regularly convert the stadium for different sports, and retractable seating for safe standing, but excludes any temporary seating or standing, such as for concerts. Stadiums are sorted in the list based on the largest of these capacities.

List of association football stadiums by capacity

The following is a list of football stadiums. They are ordered by their seating capacity, that is the maximum number of spectators that the stadium can accommodate in seated areas. All stadiums that are the home of a club or national team with a capacity of 40,000 or more are included. That is the minimum capacity required for a stadium to host FIFA World Cup finals matches.

The list contains both stadiums used solely for football, and those used for other sports as well as football. Some stadiums are only used by a team for certain high attendance matches, like

local derbies or cup games.

Marouane Fellaini

Marouane Fellaini-Bakkioui (born 22 November 1987) is a Belgian professional football player who plays as a midfielder for Chinese club Shandong Luneng Taishan.

Born in Etterbeek to Moroccan parents, Fellaini played youth football for Anderlecht, R.A.E.C. Mons, Royal Francs Borains and Charleroi S.C. before joining Standard Liège. After winning the Belgian First Division and the Ebony Shoe as a Liège player, he moved to England to join Everton. At Everton, he was the club's Young Player of the Season for 2008–09, when the club were losing finalists in the FA Cup. After five years at Everton, he transferred to Manchester United in a deal worth £27.5 million in September 2013. After five years with Manchester United and more than a decade in England, Fellaini joined Shandong Luneng in February 2019.

On the international stage, Fellaini has been a full international for Belgium since 2007, earning over 80 caps. He represented the team at the 2008 Olympics, the 2014 FIFA World Cup, UEFA Euro 2016, and the 2018 FIFA World Cup, helping Belgium to third place in the latter tournament. He announced his retirement from international football in March 2019.

Matthijs de Ligt

Matthijs de Ligt (Dutch pronunciation: [mɑˈtɛis də ˈlɪxt]; born 12 August 1999) is a Dutch professional footballer who plays as a defender for Juventus and the Netherlands national team.On 21 September 2016, de Ligt made his debut for Ajax's senior team in a cup game against Willem II. He scored from a corner after 25 minutes, making him the second-youngest goalscorer ever behind Clarence Seedorf. On 24 May, he became the youngest player ever (17 years and 285 days old) to play in a major European final when he started against Manchester United in the 2017 UEFA Europa League Final. On 17 December 2018, de Ligt won the Golden Boy award, becoming the first defender to win the award.In 2017, de Ligt made his debut for the Netherlands at the age of 17, making him the youngest player to start for the national team since 1931.

Reactions to the Manchester Arena bombing

The reactions to the Manchester Arena bombing, which occurred on 22 May 2017, include the responses by political and religious leaders, media and the general public, both within the United Kingdom, where the Manchester Arena bombing took place, and from other nations and international organizations. Numerous notable establishments around the world also held memorials.

Ariana Grande, who had been giving a concert at the Manchester Arena shortly before the attack, issued a statement thereafter via Twitter that she was "broken," and offered to help those affected by the bombing. The general public sympathised with Grande's words and showed their overwhelming support as her statement later became the second most liked tweet of all time. In addition to returning to the city to visit and FaceTime hospitalised victims, Grande subsequently organised a benefit concert, One Love Manchester, headlined by herself and a number of other artists and groups. The concert was watched by more than 100 million people worldwide and raised proceeds exceeding £10 million ($13 million) in the twelve hours following its conclusion.

In the United Kingdom, Prime Minister Theresa May chaired an emergency meeting of the COBRA committee in the hours following the 22 May 2017 bombing, and the UK's threat level was raised from "severe" to "critical" for a number of days, the first time it had stood at "critical" since 2007. May also condemned the attack, along with Mayor of Greater Manchester Andy Burnham and other leading politicians and public figures. Religious groups, including the Muslim Council of Britain, also voiced their condemnation. Internationally the attack was universally condemned by world leaders. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant issued a statement in support of the act.

Monuments in locations around the world were lit up in the colours of the Union Jack in solidarity with the UK, and silences were held to remember the victims of the bombing. A number of organisations and individuals offered tributes to the victims, including the broadcaster ITV, whose soap Coronation Street is filmed in Manchester; numerous figures from the music and entertainment industries also expressed their sympathy.

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