2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup

The 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup was the 14th edition of the CONCACAF Gold Cup, the biennial international men's football championship of the North, Central American and Caribbean region organized by CONCACAF, and 24th CONCACAF regional championship overall. The tournament was played between July 7–26, 2017 in the United States.[1][2]

The United States won their sixth title with their 2–1 victory over Jamaica in the final.[3]

2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup
2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup
Tournament details
Host countryUnited States
DatesJuly 7–26
Teams12 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)14 (in 14 host cities)
Final positions
Champions United States (6th title)
Runners-up Jamaica
Tournament statistics
Matches played25
Goals scored55 (2.2 per match)
Attendance875,667 (35,027 per match)
Top scorer(s)Canada Alphonso Davies
Martinique Kévin Parsemain
United States Jordan Morris
(3 goals each)
Best player(s)United States Michael Bradley
Best young playerCanada Alphonso Davies
Best goalkeeperJamaica Andre Blake
Fair play award United States

Qualified teams

A total of 12 teams qualified for the tournament. Three berths were allocated to North America, four to Central America, four to the Caribbean, and one to the winners of the play-off between the two fifth-placed teams of the Caribbean zone and the Central American zone.

Team Qualification Appearances
(+ CONCACAF Championship)
Previous best performance FIFA Ranking
North American zone
 United States Automatic 14th (16th) Champions (1991, 2002, 2005, 2007, 2013)
Runners-up (1989)
35
 Mexico (TH) Automatic 14th (22nd) Champions (1993, 1996, 1998, 2003, 2009, 2011, 2015)
Champions (1965, 1971, 1977)
16
 Canada Automatic 13th (16th) Champions (2000)
Champions (1985)
100
Central American zone qualified through the 2017 Copa Centroamericana
 Honduras Winners 13th (19th) Runners-up (1991)
Champions (1981)
72
 Panama Runners-up 8th (9th) Runners-up (2005, 2013) 52
 El Salvador Third Place 10th (16th) Quarterfinals (2002, 2003, 2011, 2013)
Runners-up (1963, 1981)
103
 Costa Rica Fourth Place 13th (19th) Runners-up (2002)
Champions (1963, 1969, 1989)
26
Caribbean zone qualified through the 2017 Caribbean Cup
 Curaçao Winners 1st (5th)1 Debut
Third place (1963, 1969)
68
 Jamaica Runners-up 10th (12th) Runners-up (2015) 76
 French Guiana Third Place 1st (1st) None N/A2
 Martinique Fourth Place 5th (5th) Quarterfinals (2002) N/A2
Play-off winners between Caribbean zone fifth place and Central American zone fifth place
 Nicaragua Play-off 2nd (4th) Group stage (2009)
Sixth place (1967)
105

Bold indicates that the corresponding team was hosting the event.
1. This was Curaçao's first appearance since the dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles, as its direct successor (with regards to membership in football associations), inheriting the former nation's FIFA membership and competitive record.
2. French Guiana and Martinique are not FIFA members, and so did not have a FIFA Ranking.

Venues

The venues were announced on December 19, 2016.[2] Levi's Stadium was announced as the venue of the final on February 1, 2017.[4]

Arlington Cleveland Denver Frisco Glendale
AT&T Stadium FirstEnergy Stadium[nb 1] Sports Authority Field Toyota Stadium University of Phoenix Stadium
32°44′52″N 97°5′34″W / 32.74778°N 97.09278°W 41°30′22″N 81°41′58″W / 41.50611°N 81.69944°W 39°44′38″N 105°1′12″W / 39.74389°N 105.02000°W 33°9′16″N 96°50′7″W / 33.15444°N 96.83528°W 33°31′39″N 112°15′45″W / 33.52750°N 112.26250°W
Capacity: 100,000 Capacity: 67,431 Capacity: 76,125 Capacity: 16,000 Capacity: 63,400
Cowboys Stadium field
FirstEnergy Stadium soccer
Denver Colorado Invesco Field at Mile High
Pizza Hut Park
University of Phoenix Stadium no field
Harrison

  Group stage venue    Quarter-final venue    Semi-final venue    Final venue

Houston
Red Bull Arena BBVA Compass Stadium
40°44′12″N 74°9′1″W / 40.73667°N 74.15028°W 29°45′8″N 95°21′9″W / 29.75222°N 95.35250°W
Capacity: 25,000 Capacity: 22,000
Red Bull Arena ESC
BBVA Compass Stadium, Skyline View
Nashville Pasadena
Nissan Stadium[nb 1] Rose Bowl
36°9′59″N 86°46′17″W / 36.16639°N 86.77139°W 34°9′41″N 118°10′3″W / 34.16139°N 118.16750°W
Capacity: 69,000 Capacity: 90,000
LPFieldSec341
Rose Bowl, panorama
Philadelphia San Antonio San Diego Santa Clara Tampa
Lincoln Financial Field Alamodome[nb 1] Qualcomm Stadium Levi's Stadium[nb 1] Raymond James Stadium
39°54′3″N 75°10′3″W / 39.90083°N 75.16750°W 29°25′1″N 98°28′44″W / 29.41694°N 98.47889°W 32°46′59″N 117°7′10″W / 32.78306°N 117.11944°W 37°24′11″N 121°58′12″W / 37.40306°N 121.97000°W 27°58′33″N 82°30′12″W / 27.97583°N 82.50333°W
Capacity: 69,596 Capacity: 65,000 Capacity: 70,561 Capacity: 68,500 Capacity: 65,890
Philly (45)
UTSA Inaugural Football Game
Qualcomm Jan 14 07
Entering Levi's Stadium
Raymond James Stadium02
Notes
  1. ^ a b c d This was the first time the stadium hosted a Gold Cup match.

Draw

The United States and Mexico were announced as the seeded teams of Groups B and C respectively on December 19, 2016.[2] Honduras, the winners of the 2017 Copa Centroamericana title were announced as being the seeded team in Group A on February 14, 2017.[6]

The groups and match schedule were revealed on March 7, 2017, 10:00 PST (UTC−8), at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California.[7][8] At the time of the announcement, 11 of the 12 qualified teams were known, with the identity of the CFU–UNCAF play-off winners not yet known.

Seeded teams
Group A  Honduras
Group B  United States
Group C  Mexico

Squads

The 12 national teams involved in the tournament were required to register a squad of 23 players; only players in these squads were eligible to take part in the tournament.

A provisional list of 40 players per national team was submitted to CONCACAF by June 2, 2017. The final list of 23 players per national team was submitted to CONCACAF by June 27, 2017. Three players per national team had to be goalkeepers.[9]

National teams that reached the quarter-final stage were able to swap up to six players in the final squad with six players from the provisional list within 24 hours of their final group stage game.[9]

Match officials

The match officials, which included 17 referees and 25 assistant referees, were announced on June 23, 2017.[10]

Referees
Assistant Referees
  • Costa Rica Carlos Fernández
  • Costa Rica Juan Carlos Mora
  • Guatemala Hermenerito Lea
  • Guatemala Gerson López
  • Honduras Melvyn Cruz
  • Honduras Christian Ramírez
  • Honduras Jesús Tábora
  • Mexico José Luis Camargo
  • Mexico Miguel Hernández
  • Mexico Alberto Morín
  • Mexico Marcos Quintero
  • Mexico Marvin Torrentera
  • Panama Ronald Bruna
  • Panama Gabriel Victoria
  • Panama Daniel Williamson
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis Graeme Browne
  • El Salvador Geonvany García
  • El Salvador William Torres
  • El Salvador Juan Francisco Zumba
  • Trinidad and Tobago Joseph Bertrand
  • Trinidad and Tobago Ainsley Rochard
  • United States Frank Anderson
  • United States Charles Morgante
  • United States Corey Rockwell

Group stage

The top two teams from each group and the two best third-placed teams qualified for the quarter-finals.

All match times listed are in EDT (UTC−4). If the venue is located in a different time zone, the local time is also given.

Tiebreakers

The ranking of each team in each group was determined as follows:[9]

  1. Greatest number of points obtained in group matches
  2. Goal difference in all group matches
  3. Greatest number of goals scored in all group matches
  4. Greatest number of points obtained in group matches between the teams concerned;
  5. Drawing of lots by the Gold Cup Committee

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Costa Rica 3 2 1 0 5 1 +4 7 Advance to knockout stage
2  Canada 3 1 2 0 5 3 +2 5
3  Honduras 3 1 1 1 3 1 +2 4
4  French Guiana 3 0 0 3 2 10 −8 0
French Guiana 2–4 Canada
Report
Honduras 0–1 Costa Rica
Report Ureña Goal 39'
Costa Rica 1–1 Canada
Calvo Goal 42' Report Davies Goal 26'
Honduras 3–0
Awarded[note 1]
 French Guiana
Report
Costa Rica 3–0 French Guiana
Report
Canada 0–0 Honduras
Report

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  United States (H) 3 2 1 0 7 3 +4 7 Advance to knockout stage
2  Panama 3 2 1 0 6 2 +4 7
3  Martinique 3 1 0 2 4 6 −2 3
4  Nicaragua 3 0 0 3 1 7 −6 0
United States 1–1 Panama
Dwyer Goal 50' Report Camargo Goal 60'
Martinique 2–0 Nicaragua
Report
Panama 2–1 Nicaragua
Report Chavarría Goal 49'
United States 3–2 Martinique
Report Parsemain Goal 66'74'
Panama 3–0 Martinique
Report
Nicaragua 0–3 United States
Report

Group C

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Mexico 3 2 1 0 5 1 +4 7 Advance to knockout stage
2  Jamaica 3 1 2 0 3 1 +2 5
3  El Salvador 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4
4  Curaçao 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
Curaçao 0–2 Jamaica
Report
Mexico 3–1 El Salvador
Report Bonilla Goal 10'
El Salvador 2–0 Curaçao
Report
Mexico 0–0 Jamaica
Report
Jamaica 1–1 El Salvador
Mattocks Goal 64' (pen.) Report Bonilla Goal 15'
Curaçao 0–2 Mexico
Report

Ranking of third-placed teams

The best two third-placed teams which advance to the knockout stage played the winners from another group in the quarter-finals.[9]

Pos Grp Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 A  Honduras 3 1 1 1 3 1 +2 4 Advance to knockout stage
2 C  El Salvador 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 4
3 B  Martinique 3 1 0 2 4 6 −2 3

Knockout stage

In the quarter-finals and semi-finals, if a match was tied after 90 minutes, extra time would not have been played and the match would be decided by a penalty shoot-out. In the final, if the match was tied after 90 minutes, extra time would have been played, where each team would have been allowed to make a fourth substitution. If still tied after extra time, the match would have been decided by a penalty shoot-out.[9] Unlike the previous edition of the competition, there was no third place play-off.

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
July 19 – Philadelphia
 
 
 Costa Rica1
 
July 22 – Arlington
 
 Panama0
 
 Costa Rica0
 
July 19 – Philadelphia
 
 United States2
 
 United States2
 
July 26 – Santa Clara
 
 El Salvador0
 
 United States2
 
July 20 – Glendale
 
 Jamaica1
 
 Mexico1
 
July 23 – Pasadena
 
 Honduras0
 
 Mexico0
 
July 20 – Glendale
 
 Jamaica1
 
 Jamaica2
 
 
 Canada1
 

Quarter-finals

Costa Rica 1–0 Panama
Godoy Goal 77' (o.g.) Report
United States 2–0 El Salvador
Report
Jamaica 2–1 Canada
Report Hoilett Goal 61'
Mexico 1–0 Honduras
Pizarro Goal 4' Report

Semi-finals

Costa Rica 0–2 United States
Report
Mexico 0–1 Jamaica
Report Lawrence Goal 88'

Final

United States 2–1 Jamaica
Report Watson Goal 50'

Statistics

Goalscorers

There were 55 goals scored in 25 matches, for an average of 2.2 goals per match.

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Awards

Winners

 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup Winners 

United States
Sixth title

Individual awards

The following awards were given at the conclusion of the tournament.

Best XI

The technical study group selected the tournament's best XI.[41]

Goalkeeper Defenders Midfielders Attackers

Final ranking

As per statistical convention in football, matches decided in extra time are counted as wins and losses, while matches decided by penalty shoot-outs are counted as draws.

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Final result
1  United States (H) 6 5 1 0 13 4 +9 16 Champions
2  Jamaica 6 3 2 1 7 4 +3 11 Runners-up
3  Mexico 5 3 1 1 6 2 +4 10 Eliminated in
Semi-finals
4  Costa Rica 5 3 1 1 6 3 +3 10
5  Panama 4 2 1 1 6 3 +3 7 Eliminated in
Quarter-finals
6  Canada 4 1 2 1 6 5 +1 5
7  Honduras 4 1 1 2 3 2 +1 4
8  El Salvador 4 1 1 2 4 6 −2 4
9  Martinique 3 1 0 2 4 6 −2 3 Eliminated in
Group stage
10  Nicaragua 3 0 0 3 1 7 −6 0
11  Curaçao 3 0 0 3 0 6 −6 0
12  French Guiana 3 0 0 3 2 10 −8 0

Sponsors

Theme songs

"The Arena" and "Don't Let This Feeling Fade" by American violinist Lindsey Stirling served as the official songs of the tournament. The latter features Rivers Cuomo of the band Weezer and rapper Lecrae.

"Bia Beraghsim" by Persian-Swedish singer Mahan Moin served as the official anthem of the tournament

"Levántate" by Puerto Rican singer Gale served as the official Spanish-language song of the tournament.[42]

"Thunder" and "Whatever It Takes" by American rock band Imagine Dragons also served as official anthems of the tournament.

Broadcasting rights

Territory Channel Ref
 Canada TSN (English)
Univision Canada (Spanish)
RDS (French)
[43]
 China CCTV, PPTV
Indonesia Indonesia Indovision [44]
 MENA beIN Sports (MENA)
 Turkey Tivibu Spor
 Mexico Televisa, TV Azteca and Sky Sports
 Europe Eurosport 1
 United States Fox Sports (English)
Univision (Spanish)
 South America DIRECTV Sports
 Brazil BandSports [45]
 South Africa SuperSport
 Croatia SportKlub [46]
 France beIN Sports
 Netherlands Fox Sports
 Australia beIN Sports
 Portugal Sport TV
 Poland TVP Sport* [47]
 Spain beIN Sports
GOL
 Albania SuperSport
 United Kingdom BT Sport
 Jamaica Flow sports
  • Only two matches live (opening and final). 12 matches as a first run at 8 am in Poland.

Notes

  1. ^ CONCACAF awarded Honduras a 3–0 win as a result of French Guiana fielding the ineligible player Florent Malouda, after the match had finished 0–0. Malouda had previously represented France and did not meet eligibility rules.[14]

References

  1. ^ "FIFA Council discusses vision for the future of football". FIFA.com. October 14, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c "CONCACAF Gold Cup venues, seeded teams announced". CONCACAF.com. December 19, 2016.
  3. ^ "U.S. edges Jamaica for sixth Gold Cup title". CONCACAF Gold Cup. July 27, 2017.
  4. ^ "Gold Cup Final awarded to Levi's Stadium". CONCACAF.com. February 1, 2017. Archived from the original on February 7, 2017. Retrieved February 2, 2017.
  5. ^ "Gold Cup quarterfinal, semifinal venues named; Honduras to head Group A". CONCACAF. February 14, 2017. Archived from the original on May 23, 2017. Retrieved February 14, 2017.
  6. ^ "CONCACAF Gold Cup 2017 Groups & Schedule to be Revealed at March 7 Event at Levi's Stadium in the Bay Area". CONCACAF. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 12, 2017.
  7. ^ "Gold Cup group-stage matchups, schedule unveiled". CONCACAF.com. March 7, 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d e "CONCACAF Gold Cup 2017 Regulations" (PDF). CONCACAF.com. March 1, 2017. Archived from the original (pdf) on September 5, 2017. Retrieved May 19, 2017.
  9. ^ "Match Officials Announced for Gold Cup". CONCACAF Gold Cup Official Website. June 23, 2017.
  10. ^ "French Guyana vs. Canada - 8 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 8, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  11. ^ "Honduras vs. Costa Rica - 8 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 8, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  12. ^ "2017-07-11 - Canada vs Costa Rica". canadasoccer.com. Canadian Soccer Association. July 11, 2017. Retrieved July 16, 2017.
  13. ^ "CONCACAF Gold Cup Disciplinary Committee Issues Decision in French Guiana Player Eligibility Case". goldcup.org. CONCACAF. July 14, 2017. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  14. ^ "Honduras vs. French Guiana - Football Match Summary - July 11, 2017". espn.com. ESPN Inc. July 11, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  15. ^ "Costa Rica vs. French Guyana - 14 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 14, 2017. Retrieved July 18, 2017.
  16. ^ "Canada vs. Honduras - 15 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 14, 2017. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  17. ^ "United States vs. Panama - 8 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 8, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  18. ^ "Panama vs. Nicaragua - 12 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 12, 2017. Retrieved July 14, 2017.
  19. ^ "United States vs. Martinique - 13 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 12, 2017. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  20. ^ "Panama vs. Martinique - 15 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 15, 2017. Retrieved July 17, 2017.
  21. ^ "Nicaragua vs. United States - 16 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 16, 2017. Retrieved July 22, 2017.
  22. ^ "Curaçao vs. Jamaica - 9 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 9, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  23. ^ "Mexico vs. El Salvador - 10 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 10, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017.
  24. ^ "El Salvador vs. Curaçao - 13 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 13, 2017. Retrieved July 15, 2017.
  25. ^ "Mexico vs. Jamaica - 14 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 14, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  26. ^ "Jamaica vs. El Salvador - 17 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 17, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  27. ^ "Curaçao vs. Mexico - 17 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 17, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  28. ^ "Costa Rica vs. Panama - 20 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 19, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  29. ^ "United States vs. El Salvador - 20 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 19, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  30. ^ "Jamaica vs. Canada - 21 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 20, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  31. ^ "Mexico vs. Honduras - 21 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 20, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  32. ^ "Costa Rica vs. United States - 23 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 22, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  33. ^ "Mexico vs. Jamaica - 24 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 23, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  34. ^ "United States vs. Jamaica – 27 July 2017". Soccerway. Perform Group. July 26, 2017. Retrieved April 8, 2018.
  35. ^ "USA's Bradley earns Golden Ball Award presented by Scotiabank". www.goldcup.org.
  36. ^ "Canada's Davies wins Golden Boot Award". www.goldcup.org.
  37. ^ "Jamaica's Blake captures Golden Glove Award presented by Allstate". www.goldcup.org.
  38. ^ "Canada's Davies merits Young Player Award presented by Scotiabank". www.goldcup.org.
  39. ^ "U.S. takes home Gold Cup Fair Play Award". www.goldcup.org.
  40. ^ "TSG reveals Gold Cup Best XI". www.goldcup.org.
  41. ^ ""Levántate": el himno que unirá a 12 naciones en pos de un balón durante la Copa Oro" (in Spanish). Retrieved July 6, 2017.
  42. ^ "TSN Becomes Canada's Official Broadcaster of the CONCACAF GOLD CUP and CONCACAF CHAMPIONS LEAGUE - Article - TSN". TSN. May 16, 2017. Retrieved June 11, 2017.
  43. ^ "USA - Jamaica Live Streaming and TV Listings, Live Scores, News, Videos - July 26, 2017 - CONCACAF Gold Cup :: Live Soccer TV". www.livesoccertv.com. Retrieved October 25, 2018.
  44. ^ "Bandsports transmite a fase final da Copa Ouro 2017 da Concacaf". TV Magazine (in Portuguese). July 19, 2017. Retrieved July 7, 2017.
  45. ^ "CONCACAF Gold Cup: UŽIVO na Sportklub televiziji (7-26)". SportKlub. July 7, 2017. Retrieved July 7, 2017.
  46. ^ "CONCACAF Gold Cup 2017 w TVP Sport". TakSieGra. July 6, 2017. Retrieved July 11, 2017.

External links

2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup Final

The 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup Final was a football match which determined the winners of the 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup. The match was held at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, United States, on July 26, 2017 and was contested by the United States and Jamaica.The United States won the final 2–1 for their sixth CONCACAF Gold Cup title.

2017 Caribbean Cup

The 2017 Caribbean Cup was the 19th and final edition of the Caribbean Cup, the biennial international men's football championship of the Caribbean region organized by the Caribbean Football Union (CFU).

The top four teams qualified for the 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup, while the fifth-placed team advanced to a play-off against the fifth-placed team from the 2017 Copa Centroamericana for the final Gold Cup berth.

The host for the final round was expected to be announced in January 2016.Martinique was announced as host on 25 January 2017, winning over bids of Curaçao and French Guiana. The draw for the semi-finals was also conducted on the same day at the CFU office in St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda.Curaçao won their first and only title following a 2–1 win over Jamaica in the final.

Alphonso Davies

Alphonso Boyle Davies (born November 2, 2000) is a Canadian professional soccer player who plays as a winger for Bundesliga club Bayern Munich and the Canada national team. He was the first player born in the 2000s to play in a Major League Soccer match. Davies joined Bayern in January 2019 from MLS side Vancouver Whitecaps FC on a contract lasting until 2023 for a then-MLS record transfer fee.In June 2017, he became the youngest player to appear for the Canadian men's national team. By scoring two goals in a 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup match against French Guiana, he became the youngest player to score for the Canadian men's national team, the youngest to score at the CONCACAF Gold Cup, and first player born in the 2000s to score at a top level international tournament.

Carlos Sánchez (Honduran footballer)

Carlos Sánchez (born 22 August 1990) is a Honduran professional footballer who plays as a defender for Honduran club F.C. Motagua and the Honduras national team. He has won one league title with C.D. Honduras Progreso.

Cristian Roldan

Cristian Roldan (born June 3, 1995) is an American professional soccer player, who currently plays as a midfielder for Seattle Sounders FC in Major League Soccer.

Dom Dwyer

Dominic James Dwyer (born July 30, 1990) is an English-American soccer player who plays as a forward for MLS side Orlando City and the United States men's national soccer team.

Born in England, Dwyer represented among other teams Norwich City as a youth. In 2009, he moved to the United States on a soccer scholarship and played for Tyler Junior College and the South Florida Bulls. He was drafted by Sporting Kansas City of Major League Soccer in 2012, and won the MLS Cup with them in 2013. In 2017, he joined Orlando in the largest transfer between two MLS clubs.

Dwyer became an American citizen in March 2017, and was called up to the U.S. national team later that year for the 2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup, winning the tournament.

Eduardo Lara

Eduardo Lara Lozano (born 4 September 1959 in Cali) is a Colombian football manager. Lara has coached all levels of the Colombian national youth team.

Elías Hernández

Elías Hernán Hernández Jacuinde (born 29 April 1988) is a Mexican footballer who plays for Mexican club Cruz Azul and the Mexico national team.

Félix Crisanto

Félix Crisanto (born 9 September 1990) is a Honduran professional footballer who plays as a right-back for F.C. Motagua and the Honduras national team.

Jair Pereira

Jair Pereira Rodríguez (born July 7, 1986 in Cuautla, Morelos) is a Mexican football defender who currently plays for Liga MX team C.D. Guadalajara.

Jesús Dueñas

Jesús Alberto Dueñas Manzo (March 16, 1989) is a Mexican professional footballer who plays for Liga MX club Tigres UANL and the Mexico national team.Dueñas is usually deployed as a central midfielder but he can play as right-back, winger or attacking midfielder.

Jesús Molina

Jesús Antonio Molina Granados (born 29 March 1988) is a Mexican professional footballer who plays for Liga MX club Guadalajara and the Mexico national team as midfielder.

Luis Alfonso Rodríguez

Luis Alfonso Rodríguez Alanís (born 21 January 1991) is a Mexican professional footballer who plays for Liga MX team Tigres UANL and the Mexico national team.

Nicknamed Chaka, Rodríguez is a right-footed midfielder that can play as a winger and right-back.

Luis Ricardo Reyes

Luis Ricardo Reyes Moreno (born 3 April 1991) is a Mexican professional footballer who plays as a left-back for Liga MX club América and the Mexico national team.

Marcelo Pereira

Marcelo Pereira (born 27 May 1995) is a Honduran footballer. He represented Honduras in the football competition at the 2016 Summer Olympics. In his debut, he scored a goal against Algeria. He plays for F.C. Motagua.

Martín Barragán

Martín Barragán Negrete (born July 14, 1991) is a professional Mexican footballer who currently plays for UNAM on loan from Necaxa.

Michaell Chirinos

Michaell Chirinos (born 17 June 1995), is a Honduran professional footballer who plays as a winger for Club Deportivo Olimpia and the Honduras national team.

Ricardo Canales

Ricardo Gabriel Canales Lanza (born 30 May 1982) is a Honduran footballer who currently plays for C.D.S.Vida as a goalkeeper.

A Honduran international on 6 ossacions since 2009, he represented his nation for two Gold Cups and Fifa World Cup 2010.

Sloan Privat

Sloan Privat (born 24 July 1989) is a French professional footballer who plays as a forward, most recently for Osmanlıspor.

2017 CONCACAF Gold Cup
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