2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship

The 2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship was the 15th edition of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship (34th edition if the Under-16 era is included), the annual European international youth football championship contested by the men's under-17 national teams of UEFA member associations. Azerbaijan, which were selected by UEFA on 20 March 2012, hosted the tournament between 5 and 21 May 2016.[2]

A total of 16 teams competed in the final tournament, with players born on or after 1 January 1999 eligible to participate. Each match had a duration of 80 minutes, consisting of two halves of 40 minutes with a 15-minute half-time.

Portugal were crowned champions for the second time in the under-17 era, and sixth time overall, after beating Spain in the final 5–4 through a penalty shootout.[3] France were the defending champions, but were eliminated in the group stage.[4]

2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship
2016 UEFA U-17 Avropa Çempionatı
2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship
Tournament details
Host country Azerbaijan
Dates5–21 May 2016
Teams16 (from 1 confederation)
Venue(s)4 (in 1 host city)
Final positions
Champions Portugal (6th title)
Runners-up Spain
Tournament statistics
Matches played31
Goals scored73 (2.35 per match)
Attendance61,606 (1,987 per match)
Top scorer(s)Portugal José Gomes (7 goals)
Best player(s)Portugal José Gomes[1]

Qualification

The national teams from all 54 UEFA member associations entered the competition. With Azerbaijan automatically qualified as hosts, the other 53 teams contested a qualifying competition to determine the remaining 15 spots in the final tournament.[5] The qualifying competition consisted of two rounds: the qualifying round, which took place in autumn 2015, and the elite round, which took place in spring 2016.[6]

Qualified teams

The following 16 teams qualified for the final tournament:[7]

Note: All appearance statistics include only U-17 era (since 2002).

Team Method of qualification Finals appearance Last appearance Previous best performance
 Azerbaijan Hosts 1st Debut
 Denmark Elite round Group 1 winners 4th 2011 Semi-finals (2011)
 Scotland Elite round Group 1 runners-up[^] 4th 2015 Semi-finals (2014)
 Ukraine Elite round Group 2 winners 5th 2013 Group stage (2002, 2004, 2007, 2013)
 England Elite round Group 2 runners-up[^] 11th 2015 Champions (2010, 2014)
 Italy Elite round Group 3 winners 6th 2015 Runners-up (2013)
 Bosnia and Herzegovina Elite round Group 3 runners-up[^] 1st Debut
 Germany Elite round Group 4 winners 9th 2015 Champions (2009)
 Netherlands Elite round Group 4 runners-up[^] 10th 2015 Champions (2011, 2012)
 Portugal Elite round Group 5 winners 6th 2014 Champions (2003)
 Sweden Elite round Group 5 runners-up[^] 2nd 2013 Semi-finals (2013)
 France Elite round Group 6 winners 10th 2015 Champions (2004, 2015)
 Austria Elite round Group 6 runners-up[^] 5th 2015 Third place (2003)
 Serbia Elite round Group 7 winners 5th 2011 Quarter-finals (2002)
 Belgium Elite round Group 8 winners 5th 2015 Semi-finals (2007, 2015)
 Spain Elite round Group 8 runners-up[^] 10th 2015 Champions (2007, 2008)
Notes
  1. ^ The best seven runners-up among all eight elite round groups qualified for the final tournament.

Final draw

The final draw was held on 8 April 2016, 12:00 AZT (UTC+4), at the Baku Olympic Stadium in Baku, Azerbaijan.[8] The 16 teams were drawn into four groups of four teams. Hosts Azerbaijan were assigned to position A1 in the draw, while the other teams were seeded according to their results in the qualification elite round, with the seven best elite round group winners (counting all elite round results) placed in Pot 1 and drawn to positions 1 and 2 in the groups, and the remaining eight teams placed in Pot 2 and drawn to positions 3 and 4 in the groups.[9]

  • Pot 1: Portugal, Serbia, Ukraine, Germany, Denmark, Italy, France
  • Pot 2: Belgium (eighth best group winner), England, Austria, Netherlands, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sweden, Scotland, Spain

Venues

The tournament was hosted in four venues, all in Baku:[10]

Baku Baku
Baku Olympic Stadium Azersun Arena Bakcell Arena Dalga Arena
Capacity: 68,000 Capacity: 4,735 Capacity: 10,500 Capacity: 6,700
Baku Olympic Stadium panorama 1 AzersunArena Neftchi - Qarabagh match, Bakcell Arena Dalga Arena

Squads

Each national team had to submit a squad of 18 players.[6]

Match officials

A total of 8 referees, 12 assistant referees and 4 fourth officials were appointed for the final tournament.[11]

Referees
Assistant referees
Fourth officials

Group stage

2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship map
Results of teams participating at the 2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship

The final tournament schedule was confirmed on 12 April 2016.[12]

The group winners and runners-up advanced to the quarter-finals.

Tiebreakers

The teams were ranked according to points (3 points for a win, 1 point for a draw, 0 points for a loss). If two or more teams were equal on points on completion of the group matches, the following tie-breaking criteria were applied, in the order given, to determine the rankings:[6]

  1. Higher number of points obtained in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  2. Superior goal difference resulting from the group matches played among the teams in question;
  3. Higher number of goals scored in the group matches played among the teams in question;
  4. If, after having applied criteria 1 to 3, teams still had an equal ranking, criteria 1 to 3 were reapplied exclusively to the group matches between the teams in question to determine their final rankings. If this procedure did not lead to a decision, criteria 5 to 9 applied;
  5. Superior goal difference in all group matches;
  6. Higher number of goals scored in all group matches;
  7. If only two teams had the same number of points, and they were tied according to criteria 1 to 6 after having met in the last round of the group stage, their rankings were determined by a penalty shoot-out (not used if more than two teams had the same number of points, or if their rankings were not relevant for qualification for the next stage).
  8. Lower disciplinary points total based only on yellow and red cards received in the group matches (red card = 3 points, yellow card = 1 point, expulsion for two yellow cards in one match = 3 points);
  9. Drawing of lots.

All times were local, AZT (UTC+4).[13]

Group A

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Portugal 3 2 1 0 7 0 +7 7 Knockout stage
2  Belgium 3 1 2 0 3 1 +2 5
3  Azerbaijan (H) 3 1 1 1 2 6 −4 4
4  Scotland 3 0 0 3 0 5 −5 0
Belgium 2–0 Scotland
Corryn Goal 45'
Openda Goal 60'
Report
Azerbaijan 0–5 Portugal
Report Gomes Goal 4'16'
Asadov Goal 24' (o.g.)
Miguel Luís Goal 44'
Fernandes Goal 76'
Portugal 2–0 Scotland
Quina Goal 37'
Gomes Goal 55'
Report
Azerbaijan 1–1 Belgium
Mahmudov Goal 77' Report Bongiovanni Goal 72'
Scotland 0–1 Azerbaijan
Report Nabiyev Goal 79'
Portugal 0–0 Belgium
Report

Group B

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Germany 3 2 1 0 9 3 +6 7 Knockout stage
2  Austria 3 2 0 1 4 4 0 6
3  Bosnia and Herzegovina 3 1 0 2 3 6 −3 3
4  Ukraine 3 0 1 2 3 6 −3 1
Austria 2–0 Bosnia and Herzegovina
Baumgartner Goal 18'35' Report
Ukraine 2–2 Germany
Yanakov Goal 33'
Buletsa Goal 67'
Report Otto Goal 37'
Schreck Goal 74'
Ukraine 0–2 Austria
Report Schmid Goal 7'
V. Müller Goal 21'
Germany 3–1 Bosnia and Herzegovina
Akkaynak Goal 17' (pen.)
Otto Goal 66'72'
Report Baack Goal 2' (o.g.)
Bosnia and Herzegovina 2–1 Ukraine
B. Hadžić Goal 38'40+1' Report Kulakov Goal 69'
Germany 4–0 Austria
Meisl Goal 3' (o.g.)
Akkaynak Goal 25'
Havertz Goal 32'
Dadashov Goal 80+1'
Report

Group C

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Sweden 3 2 0 1 3 2 +1 6 Knockout stage
2  England 3 2 0 1 6 3 +3 6
3  Denmark 3 1 1 1 2 3 −1 4
4  France 3 0 1 2 0 3 −3 1
France 0–0 Denmark
Report
England 1–2 Sweden
Nelson Goal 62' Report Asoro Goal 4'59'
Denmark 1–0 Sweden
Buch Jensen Goal 80+3' Report
France 0–2 England
Report Morris Goal 15'
Nelson Goal 43' (pen.)
Sweden 1–0 France
Bergqvist Goal 45' Report
Denmark 1–3 England
Odgaard Goal 80+1' Report Nelson Goal 30'
Mount Goal 51'
Hirst Goal 78'

Group D

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Spain 3 2 1 0 7 3 +4 7 Knockout stage
2  Netherlands 3 2 0 1 3 2 +1 6
3  Italy 3 1 0 2 4 6 −2 3
4  Serbia 3 0 1 2 2 5 −3 1
Italy 2–1 Serbia
Scamacca Goal 9'
Kean Goal 32'
Report Maksimović Goal 77'
Netherlands 0–2 Spain
Report Mboula Goal 16'
Ruiz Goal 52'
Italy 0–1 Netherlands
Report Nunnely Goal 78'
Serbia 1–1 Spain
Joveljić Goal 59' (pen.) Report Ruiz Goal 4'
Spain 4–2 Italy
Díaz Goal 44'
García Goal 59'
Ruiz Goal 76'
Lozano Goal 80+1'
Report Olivieri Goal 65' (pen.)
Pinamonti Goal 72'
Serbia 0–2 Netherlands
Report M. Ilić Goal 72' (o.g.)
Vente Goal 80+1'

Knockout stage

In the knockout stage, a penalty shoot-out was used to decide the winner if necessary (no extra time was played).[6]

Following a consultation between the Association of Football Federations of Azerbaijan (AFFA) and UEFA, it was decided to change the venue for the semi-finals and final from the Baku Olympic Stadium to the Dalga Arena and Bakcell Arena, respectively.[15][16]

Bracket

 
Quarter-finalsSemi-finalsFinal
 
          
 
14 May – Baku
 
 
 Portugal5
 
18 May – Baku
 
 Austria0
 
 Portugal2
 
15 May – Baku
 
 Netherlands0
 
 Sweden0
 
21 May – Baku
 
 Netherlands1
 
 Portugal (p)1 (5)
 
14 May – Baku
 
 Spain1 (4)
 
 Germany1
 
18 May – Baku
 
 Belgium0
 
 Germany1
 
15 May – Baku
 
 Spain2
 
 Spain1
 
 
 England0
 

Quarter-finals

Portugal 5–0 Austria
Gomes Goal 7' (pen.)18'47'
Djú Goal 51'
Miguel Luís Goal 77'
Report
Germany 1–0 Belgium
Dadashov Goal 46' Report
Spain 1–0 England
García Goal 11' Report
Sweden 0–1 Netherlands
Report Chong Goal 62'

Semi-finals

Portugal 2–0 Netherlands
Gomes Goal 25'
Dalot Goal 56'
Report
Germany 1–2 Spain
Dadashov Goal 11' Report Ruiz Goal 64'
Díaz Goal 78'

Final

Portugal 1–1 Spain
Dalot Goal 27' Report Díaz Goal 32'
Penalties
Gomes Penalty scored
Filipe Penalty scored
Leite Penalty scored
Dalot Penalty scored
Fernandes Penalty scored
5–4 Penalty scored Ruiz
Penalty scored Busquets
Penalty scored Brandariz
Penalty scored Díaz
Penalty missed Morlanes

Goalscorers

7 goals

Note: José Gomes scored a total of 16 goals in the 2014–15 and 2015–16 season (including qualifying), making him the competition's all-time top scorer.[17]

4 goals
3 goals
2 goals
1 goal
1 own goal
  • Austria Luca Meisl (playing against Germany)
  • Azerbaijan Elchin Asadov (playing against Portugal)
  • Germany Tom Baack (playing against Bosnia and Herzegovina)
  • Serbia Marko Ilić (playing against Netherlands)

Source: UEFA.com[18]

Team of the Tournament

Goalkeepers
Defenders
Midfielders
Forwards

Source: UEFA Technical Report[14]

References

  1. ^ Harrison, Wayne. "Golden Player 2016: José Gomes". UEFA. Retrieved 26 May 2016.
  2. ^ "Malta, Bulgaria, Azerbaijan picked for U17s". UEFA. 20 March 2012.
  3. ^ Harrison, Wayne (21 May 2016). "Portugal win second U17 EURO title on penalties". UEFA. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  4. ^ "Clinical Sweden eliminate holders France". UEFA. 13 May 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016.
  5. ^ "Under-17 entries for Azerbaijan 2015/16". UEFA.com. 2 November 2014.
  6. ^ a b c d "Regulations of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship, 2015/16" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  7. ^ "Holders France lead U17 finals lineup". UEFA.com. 4 April 2016.
  8. ^ "Final tournament draw". UEFA.com.
  9. ^ "France v England after Under-17 finals draw made". UEFA.com. 8 April 2016.
  10. ^ "Venue guide: Azerbaijan 2016". UEFA.com. Retrieved 24 April 2016.
  11. ^ "Match officials". UEFA.com.
  12. ^ "Under-17 final tournament schedule confirmed". UEFA.com. 12 April 2016.
  13. ^ "Definitive Match Schedule" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af "Technical Report" (PDF). UEFA.com. Retrieved 24 October 2016.
  15. ^ "Change to U17 EURO knockout stage schedule". UEFA.com. 11 May 2016.
  16. ^ "Final Match Schedule (change of stadium)" (PDF). UEFA.com.
  17. ^ "José Gomes crowned U17 EURO top scorer". UEFA.com. 21 May 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2016. his seven goals in Azerbaijan also making him the competition's all-time leading marksman
  18. ^ "Statistics — Tournament phase — Player statistics — Goals". UEFA.com. Retrieved 21 May 2016.

External links

2015–16 in Croatian football

The following article presents a summary of the 2015–16 football season in Croatia, which will be the 25th season of competitive football in the country.

2015–16 in Israeli football

The 2015–16 season was the 68th season of competitive football in Israel, and the 90th season under the Israeli Football Association, established in 1928, during the British Mandate.

The season saw Hapoel Be'er Sheva winning league, its first championship title since 1976 and Maccabi Haifa winning its first Israel State Cup in 18 years. In women's football, F.C. Ramat HaSharon won its first ever league title, the first since 2002 which was not won by either Maccabi Holon or ASA Tel Aviv University. F.C. Kiryat Gat won the Israeli Women's Cup, its first ever major title.

2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship qualification

The 2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship qualification was a men's under-17 football competition organised by UEFA to determine the 15 national teams joining the automatically qualified hosts Azerbaijan in the 2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship final tournament.A total of 53 national teams entered this qualifying competition, which was played in two rounds between September 2015 and April 2016. Players born on or after 1 January 1999 were eligible to participate. Each match had a duration of 80 minutes, consisting of two halves of 40 minutes with a 15-minute half-time.

2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship squads

The following is a list of squads for each national team competing at the 2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship in Azerbaijan. Each national team had to submit a squad of 18 players born on or after 1 January 1999.

2016 in Swedish football

The 2016 season was the 119th season of competitive football in Sweden. Sweden was participating in qualifying for the 2018 FIFA World Cup after UEFA Euro 2016.

Abel Ruiz

Abel Ruiz Ortega (Spanish pronunciation: [aˈβel ˈrwiθ]; born 28 January 2000) is a Spanish professional footballer who plays for FC Barcelona B as a striker.

Albania national under-17 football team

The Albania national under-17 football team represents Albania in international football at this age level in the FIFA U-17 World Cup and the UEFA European Under-17 Championship, as well as any other under-17 international football tournaments. It is controlled by Albanian Football Association, the governing body for football in Albania.

Alessandro Mallamo

Alessandro Mallamo (born 22 March 1999) is an Italian football player. He plays for Novara on loan from Atalanta.

Alessandro Plizzari

Alessandro Plizzari (born 12 March 2000) is an Italian footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Milan.

Azerbaijan national under-17 football team

The Azerbaijan national under-17 football team represents Azerbaijan in association football at the under-17 youth level, and is controlled by the Association of Football Federations of Azerbaijan.

Goran Sretenović

Goran Sretenović (Serbian Cyrillic: Горан Cpeтeнoвић; born 9 December 1968) is a Serbian football coach and a former player. Some Russian sources misspell his last name as Stretenovic.

He is currently one of the coaches for the Serbia national under-16 football team.He allowed 9 goals for FC Uralan Elista against FC Lokomotiv Moscow on 3 November 2000 in a record biggest loss (0-9) in the history of the Russian Football Premier League. Overall, he allowed 18 goals in just 4 RFPL games.

He is one of the assistant managers of Ilija Stolica of the Serbian U-17 playing at the 2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship.

Ismet Sinani

Ismet Nderim Sinani (born 31 May 1999) is a Kosovan professional footballer who plays as a forward for Juve Stabia, on loan from Milan. He also represented Albania internationally at youth level before switching his allegiance to Kosovo.

José Gomes (footballer, born 1999)

José Gomes (born 8 April 1999) is a Portuguese professional footballer who plays for S.L. Benfica as a striker.

Lennart Grill

Lennart Grill (born 25 January 1999) is a German footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for 1. FC Kaiserslautern.

Marco Olivieri

Marco Olivieri (born 30 June 1999) is an Italian football player. He plays for Juventus U23 on loan from Empoli.

Milivoje Ćirković

Milivoje Ćirković (Serbian Cyrillic: Миливоје Ћирковић; born 14 April 1977) is a Serbian former professional footballer who played at the right-back position, being known primarily for his speed. He spent most of his club career with Partizan, also representing the national team of Serbia and Montenegro.

Ćirković is best remembered for scoring the winning goal in the penalty series against Newcastle United in a Champions League qualifier, helping his team to reach the group stage of the competition for the first time in the club's history.He is one of the assistant managers of Ilija Stolica of the Serbian U-17 playing at the 2016 UEFA European Under-17 Championship.

Portugal national under-17 football team

The Portugal national under-17 football team represents Portugal in international football at this age level and is controlled by Federação Portuguesa de Futebol, the governing body for football in Portugal.

Strahinja Bošnjak

Strahinja Bošnjak (Serbian Cyrillic: Страхиња Бошњак; born 18 February 1999) is a Serbian professional footballer who plays as a defender for Voždovac.

201516 in European football (UEFA)
Domestic leagues
Domestic cups
League cups
Supercups
UEFA competitions
International competitions

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.