2016 American League Wild Card Game

The 2016 American League Wild Card Game was a play-in game during Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2016 postseason played between the American League's (AL) two wild card teams, the Toronto Blue Jays and the Baltimore Orioles. As both teams finished with identical 89–73 records, a tiebreaker was used to determine the host team. In accordance with MLB tiebreaking rules, the Blue Jays earned the right to host the game by winning their season series against the Orioles 10–9.

The Blue Jays beat the Orioles, 5–2, in extra innings.

2016 American League Wild Card Game
2016ALWClogo
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 R H E
Baltimore Orioles 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0
Toronto Blue Jays 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 5 9 0
DateOctober 4, 2016
VenueRogers Centre
CityToronto, Ontario
Managers
UmpiresTed Barrett, Gary Cederstrom (crew chief), Eric Cooper, Will Little, David Rackley and Bill Welke. Replay: Scott Barry and Mark Carlson.[1]
Attendance49,934
TelevisionCanada: Sportsnet
United States: TBS
TV announcersErnie Johnson Jr., Ron Darling, Cal Ripken Jr., and Sam Ryan
RadioCanada: Sportsnet
United States: ESPN
Radio announcersJon Sciambi and Chris Singleton

Background

This was Toronto's first appearance in the Wild Card Game and their first overall appearance as a wild card (when it was first introduced in 1995), and their second consecutive postseason appearance after winning the AL East Division the previous season. It was the second appearance in a Wild Card Game both for Baltimore and its manager Buck Showalter. Showalter's Orioles defeated the Texas Rangers in the inaugural AL Wild Card Game in 2012. This was the first postseason meeting between the two teams.

The game was played at 8:00 pm EDT on October 4, 2016 at Rogers Centre in Toronto, with the winner advancing to play the first-seeded Texas Rangers in the Division Series.[2][3] It was televised in the United States on TBS, while Sportsnet, a property of Blue Jays owner Rogers Communications, simulcast the TBS production in Canada.

The retractable dome at Rogers Centre was open for the game, the first time this was done for a postseason contest at the venue.[4]

This was the second Wild Card Game played between teams with identical regular season records, and the second time for the Baltimore Orioles. Under the 1995-2011 playoff format, the teams would have played a one-game playoff to determine the Wild Card team.

Box score

Tuesday, October 4, 2016 8:08 pm (EDT) at Rogers Centre in Toronto, Ontario
Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 R H E
Baltimore Orioles 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 0
Toronto Blue Jays 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 5 9 0
WP: Francisco Liriano (1–0)   LP: Ubaldo Jiménez (0–1)
Home runs:
BAL: Mark Trumbo (1)
TOR: José Bautista (1), Edwin Encarnación (1)
Attendance: 49,934[5]

Game summary

Toronto and Baltimore turned to their Opening Day starters, as Marcus Stroman and Chris Tillman took the mound for their respective teams.

The Blue Jays scored first with a home run by José Bautista leading off the second inning.[6] The Orioles responded two innings later with a go-ahead two-run homer from Mark Trumbo.[7] The Blue Jays recorded three hits in the fifth on their way to scoring the tying run.[8]

In the seventh inning, Orioles left fielder Hyun-soo Kim was nearly hit in the head by a beer can allegedly thrown by Kenneth Pagan, a 41-year-old copy editor for Postmedia Network from Hamilton, Ontario.[9] Pagan was later charged with mischief after surrendering himself to Toronto police amid the publication of his face from Rogers Centre security footage.[10] Roberto Osuna left the game in the 10th inning with what was later revealed to be shoulder soreness.[11]

The Toronto Blue Jays won the game 5–2 in the 11th inning when Edwin Encarnación hit a walk-off three-run homer off Ubaldo Jiménez.[12] Zach Britton, the Orioles' closer and 2016 American League Reliever of the Year, controversially did not appear in the game.[13] The Blue Jays advanced to the American League Division Series to face the Rangers for the second consecutive time in the postseason; their first meeting was in the previous year's American League Division Series.

Encarnación became only the fourth player to end a winner-take-all postseason game (that is, a game in which one team or the other was sure to be eliminated) with a walk-off home run, joining Bill Mazeroski (1960 World Series), Chris Chambliss (1976 ALCS) and Aaron Boone (2003 ALCS).[14]

References

  1. ^ "2016 World Game and Division Series Umpires". Close Call Sports & Umpire Ejection Fantasy League. October 4, 2016.
  2. ^ Newman, Mark (August 24, 2016). "To the races: MLB postseason schedule announced". MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved August 24, 2016.
  3. ^ Normandin, Marc (August 23, 2016). "2016 MLB playoff schedule released". SBNation.com. SB Nation. Retrieved August 23, 2016.
  4. ^ Johnston, Mike (October 4, 2016). "Rogers Centre dome will be open for Blue Jays-Orioles wild card game". Sportsnet.ca. Rogers Media.
  5. ^ "Boxscore: Baltimore vs. Toronto, Wild Card Game". MLB.com. Retrieved October 4, 2016.
  6. ^ Griffin, Richard (October 5, 2016). "Encarnacion hits 11th-inning walkoff, Jays advance to face Rangers: Griffin". Toronto Star. Star Media Group. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  7. ^ Nightengale, Bob (October 5, 2016). "Blue Jays beat Orioles in AL wild card on thrilling 11th-inning walk-off". USA Today. Toronto: Gannett Company. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  8. ^ Fidlin, Kevin (October 5, 2016). "Edwin Encarnacion belts Blue Jays past Orioles in extra innings". Toronto Sun. Toronto: Postmedia Network. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  9. ^ Encina, Eduardo (October 5, 2016). "Beer can thrown at Orioles' Hyun Soo Kim the latest example of poor behavior at Rogers Centre". The Baltimore Sun. Toronto: Tribune Publishing. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  10. ^ Draaisma, Muriel; Janus, Andrea (October 6, 2016). "Blue Jays fan wanted in beer-can throwing incident charged with mischief". CBC News. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved October 7, 2016.
  11. ^ Ravjiana, Alykhan (October 5, 2016). "Osuna exits in 10th with shoulder 'fatigue'". MLB.com. Toronto: MLB Advanced Media. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  12. ^ Harrison, Ian (October 5, 2016). "Encarnacion's 11th-inning HR lifts Jays over O's, into ALDS". Associated Press. Toronto: AP News. Associated Press. Archived from the original on October 10, 2016. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  13. ^ Crasnick, Jerry (October 5, 2016). "Where was Zach Britton in the 11th inning?". ESPN.com. Toronto: ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  14. ^ Schoenfield, David (October 5, 2016). "What we learned: Buck Showalter's epic failure costs Orioles". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved October 6, 2016.

External links

David Rackley

David Ross Rackley (born October 11, 1981) is a Major League Baseball umpire. He made his Major League umpiring debut on August 13, 2010. He wears uniform number 86.Before reaching the Major Leagues, Rackley umpired in the Arizona, Northwest, South Atlantic, California, Texas, International, Florida Instructional, and Arizona Instructional leagues. Rackley also umpired the 2007 All-Star Futures Game, and is an instructor at the Harry Wendelstedt Umpire School.He was hired to the full-time MLB staff prior to the 2014 season and worked his first postseason during the 2016 American League Wild Card Game.

Sports in Canada

Sports in Canada consist of a wide variety of games. The most common sports are ice hockey, lacrosse, gridiron football, soccer, basketball, curling and baseball, with ice hockey and lacrosse being the official winter and summer sports, respectively.

Ice hockey, referred to as simply "hockey", is Canada's most prevalent winter sport, its most popular spectator sport, and its most successful sport in international competition. Lacrosse, a sport with Indigenous origins, is Canada's oldest sport. Canadian football is Canada's second most popular spectator sport, being the most popular in the prairie provinces. The Canadian Football League's annual championship, the Grey Cup, is one of the country's largest annual sports events. While other sports have a larger spectator base, Association football, known in Canada as soccer in both English and French, has the most registered players of any team sport in Canada. Professional teams exist in many cities in Canada. Statistics Canada reports that the top ten sports that Canadians participate in are golf, ice hockey, swimming, soccer, basketball, baseball, volleyball, skiing (downhill and alpine), cycling and tennis.As a country with generally cold winters, Canada has enjoyed greater success at the Winter Olympics than at the Summer Olympics, although significant regional variations in climate allow for a wide variety of both team and individual sports. Major multi-sport events in Canada include the 1988 and 2010 Winter Olympics, and the 1976 Summer Olympics. Great achievements in Canadian sports are recognized by Canada's Sports Hall of Fame, while the Lou Marsh Trophy is awarded annually to Canada's top athlete by a panel of journalists. There are numerous other Sports Halls of Fames in Canada.

Will Little

William Max Little III (born March 2, 1984) is a Major League Baseball umpire. He was promoted to a full-time position in February 2015. He attended Science Hill High School in Johnson City, Tennessee, then studied biology at Milligan College, where he continued playing baseball.Little worked his first postseason assignment in 2016, working in the 2016 American League Wild Card Game.

Little was the first base umpire when Albert Pujols of the Los Angeles Angels hit his 600th career home run against the Minnesota Twins on June 3, 2017.For the 2018 regular season he was found to be a Top 10 performing home plate umpire in terms of accuracy in calling balls and strikes. His error rate was 7.66 percent. This was based on a study conducted at Boston University where 372,442 pitches were culled and analyzed. He wears #93.

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