2015 Pro Bowl

The 2015 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2014 season. It began at 6 pm local time on January 25 at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, and it was the first Pro Bowl to be held outside Hawaii since 2010. The game was televised nationally by ESPN.[1]

The game continued the "unconferenced" format that was debuted in the 2014 Pro Bowl. The game was the third Pro Bowl that took place in the same site as that year's Super Bowl. It was also the sixth consecutive year where the Pro Bowl took place prior to the Super Bowl.[1]

Hall of Fame wide receivers Cris Carter and Michael Irvin were selected as the alumni captains of the game. Jason Garrett of the Dallas Cowboys and John Harbaugh of the Baltimore Ravens were the game's coaches.[2] The coaches were to come from the higher seeded teams in each conference to lose in the Divisional Round of the 2014–15 NFL playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl. However, the Denver Broncos (the highest seeded Divisional Round loser in the AFC) and head coach John Fox mutually agreed to part ways following their playoff loss, so Harbaugh (who coached the Ravens, the other Divisional Round loser from the AFC) was selected instead.

2015 NFL Pro Bowl
2015 Pro Bowl
Team Irvin Team Carter
32 28
Head coach:
Jason Garrett
(Dallas Cowboys)
Head coach:
John Harbaugh
(Baltimore Ravens)
1234 Total
Team Irvin 91067 32
Team Carter 13780 28
DateJanuary 25, 2015
StadiumUniversity of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale, Arizona
Offensive MVPMatthew Stafford (Detroit Lions)
Defensive MVPJ. J. Watt (Houston Texans)
RefereeJohn Parry
Attendance63,225
Ceremonies
National anthemJordin Sparks
Halftime showNico & Vinz
TV in the United States
NetworkESPN
AnnouncersMike Tirico, Jon Gruden, & Lisa Salters
Nielsen ratings5.6 (national)

Game format

  • Two former players drafted players on to the teams. Each were assisted by two player captains and one NFL.com fantasy football champion.[3] Captain Michael Irvin was assisted by player captains DeMarco Murray and Joe Haden while Captain Cris Carter was assisted by player captains J. J. Watt and Antonio Brown.
  • A two-minute warning was added to the first and third quarters, plus overtime, and the ball switched hands after every quarter/overtime.[3]
  • Teams were given two timeouts per quarter (instead of the customary three timeouts per half) and if a team only used one timeout in the first or third quarter, they could carry their additional timeout to the next quarter.[4] However, timeouts could not carry over from one half to next or into first overtime.
  • No kickoffs. A coin toss determined which team is awarded possession first, and the ball was placed on the 25-yard line at the start of each quarter and after scoring plays.[3]
  • Goal posts were narrowed from 18 feet wide to 14 feet wide.
  • Extra points were attempted from the 15 yard line.
  • The rosters consisted of 44 players per squad.
  • The defense was permitted to play "cover two" and "press" coverage. In the previous years, only "man" coverage was permitted, except for goal line situations.[3]
  • Beginning at the two-minute mark of every quarter/overtime, if the offense did not gain at least one yard, the clock stopped as if the play were an incomplete pass.[3]
  • A 35-second and 25-second play clock were used instead of the usual 40-second and 25-second clock.[3]
  • The game clock did not stop on quarterback sacks outside the final two minutes of regulation.[3]

Summary

Box Score

Roster

Team Carter

Team Carter

Quarterbacks

Running Backs

Wide Receivers

Tight Ends

Offensive Tackles

Offensive Guards

 

Centers

Defensive Ends

Defensive Tackles

Outside Linebackers

Inside Linebackers

Cornerbacks

 

Safeties

Punter

Placekicker

Return Specialist

Long Snapper

Special Teamer


Team Irvin

Team Irvin

Quarterbacks

Running Backs

Wide Receivers

Tight Ends

Offensive Tackles

Offensive Guards

 

Centers

Defensive Ends

Defensive Tackles

Outside Linebackers

Inside Linebackers

Cornerbacks

 

Safeties

Punter

Placekicker

Return Specialist

Long Snapper

Special Teamer


Selected but did not participate

Selected but did not participate [d]

Quarterbacks

Running Backs

Wide Receivers

 

Tight Ends

Offensive Tackles

Offensive Guards

Defensive Tackles

Inside Linebackers

 

Cornerbacks

Safeties

Placekicker

Special Teamer


Notes:

(C) signifies the player was selected as a captain
a Replacement selection due to injury or vacancy
b Injured player; selected but will not participate
c Selected but did not play because his team advanced to Super Bowl XLIX (see Pro Bowl "Player Selection" section)
d Players must have accepted their invitations as alternates to be listed; those who declined, such as Joe Flacco and Philip Rivers, are not considered Pro Bowlers

Number of selections per team

American Football Conference
Team Selections
Denver Broncos 11
Indianapolis Colts 7
New England Patriots 5
Pittsburgh Steelers 5
Baltimore Ravens 4
Cincinnati Bengals 4
Cleveland Browns 4
Kansas City Chiefs 4
Buffalo Bills 3
Houston Texans 3
Miami Dolphins 3
New York Jets 2
San Diego Chargers 2
Oakland Raiders 1
Jacksonville Jaguars 0
Tennessee Titans 0
National Football Conference
Team Selections
Philadelphia Eagles 9
Dallas Cowboys 8
Green Bay Packers 7
Detroit Lions 5
Seattle Seahawks 5
Arizona Cardinals 4
New Orleans Saints 4
Atlanta Falcons 3
San Francisco 49ers 3
Carolina Panthers 2
Chicago Bears 2
St. Louis Rams 2
Washington Redskins 2
New York Giants 1
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 1
Minnesota Vikings 0

References

  1. ^ a b "2015 Pro Bowl to be Played in Arizona; 2016 Pro Bowl Slated for Hawaii". National Football League. April 9, 2014. Archived from the original on April 9, 2014. Retrieved April 9, 2014.
  2. ^ "Ravens' Harbaugh, Cowboys' Garrett to coach Pro Bowl teams". Yahoo News. January 13, 2015. Retrieved January 16, 2015.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "2014 Pro Bowl features new format for NFL all-star game". NFL.com. July 31, 2013. Archived from the original on December 12, 2013. Retrieved April 4, 2013.
  4. ^ "2015 Pro Bowl to feature narrowed goal posts". NFL.com. January 20, 2015. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  5. ^ "Drew Brees added to 2015 Pro Bowl roster". Saints.com. Archived from the original on August 21, 2017. Retrieved January 9, 2015.
  6. ^ "Andy Dalton added to Pro Bowl". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  7. ^ Wilson, Aaron (January 13, 2015). "Ravens RB Justin Forsett added to Pro Bowl, replacing Texans' Arian Foster". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved January 13, 2015.
  8. ^ Gantt, Darin (January 19, 2015). "Alfred Morris to replace LeSean McCoy in the Pro Bowl". ProFootballTalk.com. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  9. ^ "Kyle Long Breaks News That Martellus Bennett Named to Pro Bowl". January 19, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  10. ^ "Texans' Duane Brown Added To Pro Bowl". cbslocal.com. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  11. ^ "PRESS RELEASE: Pouncey Added To Pro Bowl". miamidolphins.com. Retrieved January 10, 2015.
  12. ^ "Eagles' Evan Mathis named to Pro Bowl replacing injured New Orleans Saints' Jahri Evans". nj.com. Retrieved January 7, 2015.
  13. ^ "Antonio Cromartie headed to the Pro Bowl". SB Nation. January 18, 2015. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  14. ^ a b "Packers WR Cobb and CB Shields selected to the Pro Bowl". Packers.com. January 19, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  15. ^ "Browns safety Donte Whitner added to Pro Bowl". ESPN.com. January 19, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  16. ^ "NFL Pro Bowl rosters: Antoine Bethea to replace Kam Chancellor, Mike Iupati not going". NinersNation.com. January 19, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  17. ^ "Cody Parkey to replace Vinatieri or Gostkowski at Pro Bowl". csnphilly.com. Retrieved January 12, 2015.
  18. ^ "Matt Ryan named to Pro Bowl". nbcsports.com. January 18, 2015. Retrieved January 26, 2015.
  19. ^ "Matthew Stafford named to Pro Bowl roster". nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  20. ^ "Anderson named to 2015 Pro Bowl". DenverBroncos.com. January 19, 2015. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  21. ^ "Mark Ingram replaces Marshawn Lynch on Pro Bowl roster". nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  22. ^ "Emmanuel Sanders will replace Julio Jones at the Pro Bowl". nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  23. ^ "Odell Beckham Jr. named to 2015 Pro Bowl". Giants.com. Archived from the original on August 18, 2017. Retrieved January 7, 2015.
  24. ^ "Lions' Tate added to Pro Bowl roster". FoxSports.com. January 18, 2015. Retrieved January 18, 2015.
  25. ^ "Jason Witten To Replace Julius Thomas In Pro-Bowl". allfortennessee.com. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  26. ^ "Sheldon Richardson Named to Pro Bowl". nyjets.com. Retrieved January 14, 2015.
  27. ^ "Geno Atkins added to Pro Bowl roster". NBCSports.com. January 16, 2015. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  28. ^ "Colts Linebacker D'Qwell Jackson Named to the Pro Bowl". SB Nation. January 20, 2015. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  29. ^ "Colts Safety Mike Adams Named to the Pro Bowl". SB Nation. January 20, 2015. Retrieved January 20, 2015.
  30. ^ "Darrell Stuckey added to Pro Bowl roster". ESPN.com. January 19, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  31. ^ "Eagles WR Jeremy Maclin added to Pro Bowl roster". nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 16, 2015.

External links

2014 All-Pro Team

The 2014 All-Pro Teams were named by the Associated Press (AP), the Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and the Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2014 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2015 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book and also part of the language of the 2011 NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Any player selected to the first-team of any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro." The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers and broadcasters. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and was released January 20, 2015. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2014 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2014 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 82nd season in the National Football League and the second under head coach Chip Kelly. The Eagles led the NFC East for most of the year, but a loss to the Redskins in week 16 eliminated them from playoff contention.

After quarterback Nick Foles led them to a 6–2 start, despite struggling with turnovers more so than he did in 2013 (where he threw only 2 interceptions and lost 1 fumble), he was injured in week 9, causing backup Mark Sanchez to take over as starting quarterback. The Eagles led the NFC East until week 15, when they lost to their rivals, the Dallas Cowboys. With a loss to the 3–11 Washington Redskins in Week 16, and the Cowboys defeating the Indianapolis Colts, the Eagles were eliminated from playoff contention a week after they lost control of their division. The Eagles suffered one of their worst collapses in NFL history starting the season 9-3 before going 1-3 in the last four games with two losses against their division rivals, the Cowboys and Redskins.Despite missing the playoffs, they had 9 selections for the 2015 Pro Bowl, second only to the Denver Broncos, who had 11.

2016 Pro Bowl

The 2016 Pro Bowl (branded as the 2016 Pro Bowl presented by USAA for sponsorship reasons) was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2015 season, which was played at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 31, 2016.

Andy Reid of the Kansas City Chiefs and Mike McCarthy of the Green Bay Packers were selected to coach the teams due to their teams being the highest seeded teams from each conference to lose in the Divisional Round of 2015–16 NFL playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl. On January 27, Mike McCarthy announced that he would not be coaching the Pro Bowl due to an illness and also announced that assistant head coach Winston Moss would take over head coaching duties. This was also the sixth consecutive year that the Pro Bowl took place prior to the Super Bowl. At the Pro Bowl Draft, the Chiefs' coaching staff was assigned to Team Rice, and the Packers' coaching staff was assigned to Team Irvin.The game continued the fantasy draft format that debuted with the 2014 Pro Bowl. The two teams were to be drafted and captained by two Hall of Famers, Jerry Rice (winning 2014 Pro Bowl captain) and Michael Irvin (winning 2015 Pro Bowl captain). Darren Woodson and Eric Davis served as defensive co-captains for Irvin and Rice respectively, in both cases reuniting two former teammates (Irvin and Woodson were teammates on the Dallas Cowboys from 1992 to 1999, while Rice and Davis played together with the San Francisco 49ers from 1990 to 1995). The Fantasy draft was held January 27 at 7:30 P.M. EST on ESPN2 at Wheeler Army Airfield in Wahiawa, Hawaii as part of an extension to the NFL's military appreciation campaign.

Antoine Bethea

Antoine Akeem Bethea (; born July 27, 1984) is an American football safety for the New York Giants of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Howard and was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts in the sixth round of the 2006 NFL Draft. Bethea has also played for the San Francisco 49ers and Arizona Cardinals. He has been selected for the Pro Bowl three times and won Super Bowl XLI as a member of the Colts, beating the Chicago Bears.

Arizona Cardinals

The Arizona Cardinals are a professional American football franchise based in the Phoenix metropolitan area. The Cardinals compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) West division. The Cardinals were founded as the Morgan Athletic Club in 1898, and are the oldest continuously run professional football team in the United States. The Cardinals play their home games at State Farm Stadium, which opened in 2006 and is located in the northwestern suburb of Glendale.

The team was established in Chicago in 1898 as an amateur football team and joined the NFL as a charter member on September 17, 1920. Along with the Chicago Bears, the club is one of two NFL charter member franchises still in operation since the league's founding. (The Green Bay Packers were an independent team until they joined the NFL a year after its creation in 1921.) The club then moved to St. Louis in 1960 and played in that city through 1987 (sometimes referred to as the "Football Cardinals" or the "Big Red" to avoid confusion with the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball). Before the 1988 season, the team moved west to Tempe, Arizona, a college suburb east of Phoenix, and played their home games for the next 18 seasons at Sun Devil Stadium on the campus of Arizona State University. In 2006, the club moved to their current home field in Glendale, although the team's executive offices and training facility remain in Tempe.

The franchise has won two NFL championships, both while it was based in Chicago. The first occurred in 1925, but is the subject of controversy, with supporters of the Pottsville Maroons believing that Pottsville should have won the title. Their second title, and the first to be won in a championship game, came in 1947, nearly two decades before the first Super Bowl. They returned to the title game to defend in 1948, but lost the rematch 7–0 in a snowstorm in Philadelphia.

Since winning the championship in 1947, the team suffered many losing seasons, and currently holds the longest active championship drought of North American sports at 70 consecutive seasons after Major League Baseball's Chicago Cubs ended their 108 year drought in 2016. In 2012 the Cardinals became the first NFL franchise to lose 700 games since its inception. The franchise's all-time win-loss record (including regular season and playoff games) at the conclusion of the 2018 season is 560–762–40 (553–753–40 in the regular season, 7–9 in the playoffs). They have been to the playoffs ten times and have won seven playoff games, three of which were victories during their run in the 2008–09 NFL playoffs. During that season, they won their only NFC Championship Game since the 1970 AFL–NFL merger, and reached Super Bowl XLIII (losing 27–23 to the Pittsburgh Steelers). The team has also won five division titles (1974, 1975, 2008, 2009 and 2015) since their 1947–48 NFL championship game appearances. The Cardinals are the only NFL team who have never lost a playoff game at home, with a 5–0 record: the 1947 NFL Championship Game, two postseason victories during the aforementioned 2008–09 NFL playoffs, one during the 2009–10 playoffs, and one during the 2015–16 playoffs.

From 1988 through 2012 (except 2005, when they trained in Prescott), the Cardinals conducted their annual summer training camp at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff. The Cardinals moved their training camp to State Farm Stadium (then known as University of Phoenix Stadium) in 2013. The stadium was the site of the 2015 Pro Bowl, unlike in past years, where it was held at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The stadium also played host to Super Bowls XLII and XLIX, and will host Super Bowl LVII in 2023.

C. J. Anderson

Cortrelle Javon "C. J." Anderson (born February 10, 1991) is an American football running back for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at California and was signed by the Denver Broncos as an undrafted free agent in 2013. With Denver he made one Pro Bowl and won Super Bowl 50. He also played for the Los Angeles Rams, where he played in Super Bowl LIII.

C. J. Mosley (linebacker)

Clint Mosley Jr. (born June 19, 1992) is an American football linebacker for the New York Jets of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Alabama, and was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens in the first round of the 2014 NFL Draft.

Cody Parkey

Cody Parkey (born February 19, 1992) is an American football placekicker who is currently a free agent. He played college football at Auburn and was signed by the Indianapolis Colts as an undrafted free agent in 2014. He has also been a member of the Philadelphia Eagles, Cleveland Browns, Miami Dolphins, and Chicago Bears.

Geno Atkins

Gene "Geno" Reynard Atkins Jr. (born March 28, 1988) is an American football defensive tackle for the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Georgia, and was drafted by the Bengals in the fourth round of the 2010 NFL Draft. Atkins has twice been selected to the First Team All-Pro and is a 7 time Pro-Bowler.

J. J. Watt

Justin James Watt (born March 22, 1989) is an American football defensive end for the Houston Texans of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Texans with the 11th pick in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft, and played college football at Wisconsin.

Watt received the AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award three times in his first five seasons. Although primarily a defensive end, he occasionally shifts to defensive tackle in some situations. He has also taken snaps on offense, catching three touchdown passes during the 2014 season. In 2014, Watt became the first player in NFL history to record two 20+ sack seasons in a career. He holds the Texans' franchise records for both sacks and forced fumbles. In 2017, Sports Illustrated named Watt its Sportsperson of the Year.

Jason Kelce

Jason Kelce (; born November 5, 1987) is an American football center for the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Eagles in the sixth round of the 2011 NFL Draft. He played college football at Cincinnati. Kelce is a Super Bowl champion, two time Pro-Bowler and is a two time First Team All-Pro.

John Parry (American football official)

John Parry (born c. 1965) is a retired American football official who worked in the National Football League (NFL) from 2000 to 2018. He wore uniform number 132, and was the referee for two Super Bowls.

Justin Houston

Justin Donovan Houston (born January 21, 1989) is an American football defensive end for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Georgia, where he earned All-American honors, and was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the third round of the 2011 NFL Draft. A four-time Pro Bowl selection, he was also named to the All-Pro team in 2014.

List of Pro Bowl players, A

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have been selected to play in the NFL's annual Pro Bowl game, beginning with the 1950 season.

Between 1938 and 1942, an NFL all star team played the league champion in the NFL All-Star Game. Participants in these games are not recognized by the NFL as Pro Bowlers, and they are not included in this list. No games were played between 1943 and 1950.

Between 1961 and 1969, the NFL and AFL played separate all-star games. This list includes players who were selected to play in the American Football League All-Star game during that period.

List of Pro Bowl players, B

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who have been selected to play in the NFL's annual Pro Bowl game, beginning with the 1950 season.

Between 1938 and 1942, an NFL all star team played the league champion in the NFL All-Star Game. Participants in these games are not recognized by the NFL as Pro Bowlers, and they are not included in this list. No games were played between 1943 and 1950.

Between 1961 and 1969, the NFL and AFL played separate all-star games. This list includes players who were selected to play in the American Football League All-Star game during that period.

Pro Bowl

The Pro Bowl is the all-star game of the National Football League (NFL). From the merger with the rival American Football League (AFL) in 1970 up through 2013 and since 2017, it is officially called the AFC–NFC Pro Bowl, matching the top players in the American Football Conference (AFC) against those in the National Football Conference (NFC). From 2014 through 2016, the NFL experimented with an unconferenced format, where the teams were selected by two honorary team captains (who are each in the Hall of Fame), instead of selecting players from each conference. The players were picked in a televised "schoolyard pick" prior to the game.Unlike most major sports leagues, which hold their all-star games roughly midway through their regular seasons, the Pro Bowl is played around the end of the NFL season. The first official Pro Bowl was played in January 1951, three weeks after the 1950 NFL Championship Game (between 1939 and 1942, the NFL experimented with all-star games pitting the league's champion against a team of all-stars). Between 1970 and 2009, the Pro Bowl was usually held the weekend after the Super Bowl. Since 2010, it has been played the weekend before the Super Bowl. Players from the two teams competing in the Super Bowl do not participate.

For years, the game has suffered from lack of interest due to perceived low quality, with observers and commentators expressing their disfavor with it in its current state. It draws lower TV ratings than regular season NFL games, although the game draws similar ratings to other major all-star games, such as the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. However, the biggest concern of teams is to avoid injuries to the star players. The Associated Press wrote that players in the 2012 game were "hitting each other as though they were having a pillow fight".Between 1980 and 2016, the game was played at Aloha Stadium in Hawaii except for two years (2010 and 2015). On June 1, 2016, the NFL announced that they reached a multi-year deal to move the game to Orlando, Florida as part of the league's ongoing efforts to make the game more relevant.

State Farm Stadium

State Farm Stadium, formerly known as University of Phoenix Stadium, is a multi-purpose football stadium located in Glendale, Arizona, west of Phoenix. It is the home of the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL) and the annual Fiesta Bowl. It replaced Tempe's Sun Devil Stadium as the Valley of the Sun's main stadium. The stadium is adjacent to the Gila River Arena, home of the Arizona Coyotes NHL team.

The stadium has hosted the Fiesta Bowl, the 2007, 2011 and 2016 College Football Playoff National Championships, Super Bowl XLII in 2008, the Pro Bowl and Super Bowl XLIX in 2015, and will host Super Bowl LVII in 2023. It was one of the stadiums for the 2015 CONCACAF Gold Cup and the Copa América Centenario in 2016. It hosted the NCAA Final Four in 2017 and will do so again in 2024.

The University of Phoenix acquired the naming rights in September 2006, shortly after the stadium had opened under the name Cardinals Stadium and retained the rights until September 2018 when State Farm acquired the naming rights. The Cardinals and State Farm reached agreement on an 18-year commitment that resulted in the team’s home venue becoming State Farm Stadium.

Tashaun Gipson

Tashaun Gipson (born August 7, 1990) is an American football free safety for the Houston Texans of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Wyoming, and signed with the Cleveland Browns as an undrafted free agent in 2012. He has also played for the Jacksonville Jaguars.

Vontae Davis

Vontae Ottis Davis (born May 27, 1988) is a former American football cornerback who played for the Miami Dolphins, Indianapolis Colts, and Buffalo Bills of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Illinois, and was drafted by the Dolphins in the first round of the 2009 NFL Draft. He made two Pro Bowls in his career. Davis retired from the NFL in the middle of the Bills' second game of the 2018 season, removing himself from the game at halftime.

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