2014 Pro Bowl

The 2014 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2013 season. It took place at 2:30 pm local time on January 26 at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The game was televised nationally by NBC and was the final Pro Bowl on network television before ABC’s airing in 2018 as part of a simulcast with sister network ESPN, whose parent company Disney currently holds domestic TV rights to the game.

Significant changes to the Pro Bowl format were adopted in an attempt to make the game more "fan-friendly". These changes were proposed by National Football League Players Association president Dominique Foxworth and developed in partnership between the league and the player's union.[1]

The most significant change was a switch to a "fantasy draft" format rather than pitting AFC all-stars against NFC all-stars. Hall of Fame players Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders were chosen as honorary team captains, and joined by two active players each to assist in their selections. Chuck Pagano of the AFC South winning Indianapolis Colts coached Team Sanders, while Ron Rivera of the NFC South winning Carolina Panthers coached Team Rice. These coaches were selected for coaching the highest seeded teams to lose in the Divisional round of the playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl.

Team Rice won the game 22–21.[2]

2014 NFL Pro Bowl
2014 Pro Bowl logo
Team Rice Team Sanders
22 21
Head coach:
Ron Rivera
(Carolina Panthers)
Head coach:
Chuck Pagano
(Indianapolis Colts)
1234 Total
Team Rice 01408 22
Team Sanders 7707 21
DateJanuary 26, 2014
StadiumAloha Stadium, Honolulu, Hawaii
Offensive MVPNick Foles (Philadelphia Eagles)
Defensive MVPDerrick Johnson (Kansas City Chiefs)
RefereeScott Green
Attendance47,270
Ceremonies
National anthemGrace Potter
Coin tossAdm. Harry B. Harris Jr., USN
Halftime showFall Out Boy
TV in the United States
NetworkNBC
AnnouncersAl Michaels, Cris Collinsworth, Michele Tafoya, and Doug Flutie
Nielsen ratings5.4 (national)
US viewership: 9.27 million est.
Market share6

Rule changes

  • The rosters now consist of 44 players per squad, with an additional defensive back added.[1]
  • Two former players, Jerry Rice and Deion Sanders, drafted players to be members of the teams. Each was assisted by two player captains, and a top player from NFL.com fantasy football. The player captains were the top two offensive and defensive players from teams not in the conference championships, as determined by a vote; Drew Brees and Robert Quinn represented Team Rice, while Team Sanders was represented by Jamaal Charles and J. J. Watt. The draft was held on January 21 and 22, 2014, with the selection of top offensive and defensive positions held during a primetime broadcast on the second day, aired by NFL Network.[3][4]
  • A "Game within the Game" format saw the addition of two-minute warnings to all four quarters, with a change of possession to start each quarter. The intention of this rule is to encourage four exciting two-minute drills.[1]
  • No kickoffs. A coin toss will determine which team is awarded possession first, and the ball will be placed on the 25-yard line at the start of each quarter and after scoring plays.[1]
  • The defense is now permitted to play "cover two" and "press" coverage. In the previous years, only the "man" coverage was permitted, except for goal line situations.[1]
  • Beginning at the two-minute mark of every quarter, if the offense does not gain at least one yard, the clock stops as if the play were an incomplete pass.[1]
  • A 35-second and 25-second play clock is used instead of the usual 40-second and 25-second clock.[1]
  • The game clock does not stop on quarterback sacks outside of the final 2 minutes of regulation.[1]

Summary

To begin the game, the coin toss was won by Team Sanders. They decided to defer to the second half, so Team Rice started with the ball.

The game featured six interceptions and nine sacks, while the 22–21 score was the lowest since the 2006 Pro Bowl, which ended with a 23–17 NFC win.[5]

Scoring summary

The scores broken down by quarter:[6][7]

Rosters

Team Sanders

Team Sanders

Quarterbacks

Running Backs

Wide Receivers

Tight Ends

Offensive Tackles

Offensive Guards

Centers

 

Defensive Ends

Defensive Tackles

Outside Linebackers

Inside Linebackers

Cornerbacks

Safeties

 

Punter

Placekicker

Return Specialist

Long Snapper

Special Teamer


Team Rice

Team Rice

Quarterbacks

Running Backs

Wide Receivers

Tight Ends

Offensive Tackles

Offensive Guards

Centers

 

Defensive Ends

Defensive Tackles

Outside Linebackers

Inside Linebackers

Cornerbacks

Safeties

 

Punter

Placekicker

Return Specialist

Long Snapper

Special Teamer


Selected but did not participate

Selected but did not participate

Quarterbacks

Running Backs

Wide Receivers

Tight Ends

Offensive Tackles

Offensive Guards

Centers

 

Defensive Tackles

Outside Linebackers

Inside Linebackers

Cornerbacks

Safeties

 

Placekicker


Notes:

(C) signifies the player was selected as a captain
a Replacement selection due to injury or vacancy
b Injured player; selected but did not play
c Selected but did not play because his team advanced to Super Bowl XLVIII (see Pro Bowl "Player Selection" section)

Number of selections per team

American Football Conference
Team Selections
Kansas City Chiefs 10
Cleveland Browns 6
Denver Broncos 5
New England Patriots 5
Baltimore Ravens 4
Buffalo Bills 4
Miami Dolphins 4
Houston Texans 3
Indianapolis Colts 3
Cincinnati Bengals 2
New York Jets 2
Pittsburgh Steelers 2
San Diego Chargers 2
Jacksonville Jaguars 1
Oakland Raiders 1
Tennessee Titans 1
National Football Conference
Team Selections
San Francisco 49ers 10
Carolina Panthers 7
Seattle Seahawks 6
Chicago Bears 5
Dallas Cowboys 5
New Orleans Saints 5
Philadelphia Eagles 5
Arizona Cardinals 4
Washington Redskins 3
Detroit Lions 2
Minnesota Vikings 2
St. Louis Rams 2
Tampa Bay Buccaneers 2
Atlanta Falcons 1
Green Bay Packers 1
New York Giants 1

Broadcasting

The game was televised nationally by NBC and was the final Pro Bowl on network television for the foreseeable future. ESPN took over the exclusive broadcast rights to the Pro Bowl, effective in 2015. In France, the game was televised by BeIN Sport, and in the United Kingdom and Ireland, by Sky Sports. In Slovenia, the game was televised by Šport TV, and in Germany, by Sport1 US.

Westwood One radio also broadcast the game nationally.

Ratings

7pm; Cris Collinsworth’s Sunday Night Football Special

  • HH: 3.6; Viewers: 5.555 million

7:30pm; 2014 Pro Bowl

  • HH: 6.6; Viewers: 11.378 million [1]

10:47pm; Pro Bowl Post-Game

  • HH: 4.7; Viewers: 7.822 million
  • 7:30 – HH: 6.3; Viewers: 10.809 million
  • 8:00 – HH: 7.1; Viewers: 12.502 million
  • 8:30 – HH: 7.1; Viewers: 12.588 million
  • 9:00 – HH: 6.4; Viewers: 11.248 million
  • 9:30 – HH: 6.4; Viewers: 10.961 million
  • 10:00 – HH: 6.3; Viewers: 10.514 million
  • 10:30-10:47 – HH: 6.5; Viewers: 10.750 million

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "2014 Pro Bowl features new format for NFL all-star game". NFL.com. July 31, 2013. Archived from the original on December 12, 2013. Retrieved April 4, 2013.
  2. ^ "Mike Tolbert's 2-point conversion clinches Pro Bowl win for Team Rice". ESPN. 26 January 2014. Retrieved 31 January 2014.
  3. ^ "2014 NFL Pro Bowl Draft to be televised Jan. 22". SB Nation. Vox Media. Retrieved 24 May 2017.
  4. ^ Lund, John (2013-07-31). "2014 Pro Bowl Features New Format". Raiders.com. Retrieved 2013-09-15.
  5. ^ Mayer, Larry (January 26, 2014). "Forte, Jeffery, Marshall win Pro Bowl". Chicago Bears. Archived from the original on January 30, 2014. Retrieved January 27, 2014.
  6. ^ "Rice vs. Sanders - Box Score - January 26, 2014 - ESPN". ESPN.com.
  7. ^ "Watch Team Jerry Rice vs. Team Deion Sanders [01/26/2014] - NFL.com". www.nfl.com.
  8. ^ "Thank the Patriots - Nick Foles makes Pro Bowl". CSNPhilly.com. ComcastSports.net. January 11, 2014. Archived from the original on 2014-01-12. Retrieved January 12, 2014.
  9. ^ "Andrew Luck is Heading to the Pro Bowl". stampedeblue.com. Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  10. ^ "Packers RB Eddie Lacy to the Pro Bowl as 49ers, Seahawks Advance". CheeseheadTV.com. January 13, 2014. Retrieved January 13, 2014.
  11. ^ "Adrian Peterson bows out of Pro Bowl". foxsports.com. Retrieved January 15, 2014.
  12. ^ "DeSean Jackson replacing Andre Johnson in Pro Bowl". profootballtalk.nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 17, 2014.
  13. ^ "Jason Witten added to Pro Bowl". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  14. ^ "Duane Brown replaces Jason Peters in Pro Bowl". profootballtalk.nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
  15. ^ "Bears' Kyle Long Added To Pro Bowl". chicago.cbslocal.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  16. ^ "Brian Orakpo headed to third Pro Bowl". washingtonpost.com. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  17. ^ "Poz headed to Hawaii". Jaguars.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  18. ^ "Tim Jennings added to the Pro Bowl". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  19. ^ "T. J. Ward replaces Troy Polamalu on Pro Bowl roster". nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  20. ^ a b "Chiefs' Derrick Johnson, Alex Smith going to Pro Bowl". kansascity.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  21. ^ Eatman, Nick (January 20, 2014). "DeMarco Murray Added To Pro Bowl Roster; 5th Cowboy". DallasCowboys.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  22. ^ "Cards' Fitzgerald to replace Thomas in Pro Bowl". sacbee.com. Archived from the original on February 1, 2014. Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  23. ^ "Alshon Jeffery replaces Calvin Johnson on Pro Bowl roster". profootballtalk.nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 9, 2014.
  24. ^ "Falcons' Tony Gonzalez named to 14th Pro Bowl team". SportsIllustrated.com. January 21, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  25. ^ "Panthers' Gross joins Pro Bowl contingent". charlotteobserver.com. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  26. ^ "Evan Mathis makes it to the Pro Bowl". nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  27. ^ "Nick Mangold named to Pro Bowl". nbcsports.com. Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  28. ^ "Cowboys' Jason Hatcher replaces Haloti Ngata in Pro Bowl". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved January 16, 2014.
  29. ^ "Marcell Dareus headed to first career Pro Bowl". buffalobills.com. Archived from the original on January 22, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  30. ^ "Jets' Antonio Cromartie heading to Pro Bowl as replacement for Aqib Talib". nj.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  31. ^ "Antrel Rolle named to Pro Bowl". giants.com. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  32. ^ "Rookie Eric Reid to rep 49ers at Pro Bowl". ESPN.com. January 21, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  33. ^ "Stephen Gostkowski added to Pro Bowl". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 19, 2014.
  34. ^ Florio, Mike (January 22, 2014). "A ninth Niner passed on Pro Bowl". NBCSports.com. Retrieved February 3, 2014.

External links

2013 All-Pro Team

The 2013 All-Pro Teams were named by the Associated Press (AP) the Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), and the Sporting News (SN) for performance in the 2013 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2014 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book. Any player selected to any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro". The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and was released January 28, 2014. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2015 Pro Bowl

The 2015 Pro Bowl was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2014 season. It began at 6 pm local time on January 25 at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, and it was the first Pro Bowl to be held outside Hawaii since 2010. The game was televised nationally by ESPN.The game continued the "unconferenced" format that was debuted in the 2014 Pro Bowl. The game was the third Pro Bowl that took place in the same site as that year's Super Bowl. It was also the sixth consecutive year where the Pro Bowl took place prior to the Super Bowl.Hall of Fame wide receivers Cris Carter and Michael Irvin were selected as the alumni captains of the game. Jason Garrett of the Dallas Cowboys and John Harbaugh of the Baltimore Ravens were the game's coaches. The coaches were to come from the higher seeded teams in each conference to lose in the Divisional Round of the 2014–15 NFL playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl. However, the Denver Broncos (the highest seeded Divisional Round loser in the AFC) and head coach John Fox mutually agreed to part ways following their playoff loss, so Harbaugh (who coached the Ravens, the other Divisional Round loser from the AFC) was selected instead.

2016 Pro Bowl

The 2016 Pro Bowl (branded as the 2016 Pro Bowl presented by USAA for sponsorship reasons) was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2015 season, which was played at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 31, 2016.

Andy Reid of the Kansas City Chiefs and Mike McCarthy of the Green Bay Packers were selected to coach the teams due to their teams being the highest seeded teams from each conference to lose in the Divisional Round of 2015–16 NFL playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl. On January 27, Mike McCarthy announced that he would not be coaching the Pro Bowl due to an illness and also announced that assistant head coach Winston Moss would take over head coaching duties. This was also the sixth consecutive year that the Pro Bowl took place prior to the Super Bowl. At the Pro Bowl Draft, the Chiefs' coaching staff was assigned to Team Rice, and the Packers' coaching staff was assigned to Team Irvin.The game continued the fantasy draft format that debuted with the 2014 Pro Bowl. The two teams were to be drafted and captained by two Hall of Famers, Jerry Rice (winning 2014 Pro Bowl captain) and Michael Irvin (winning 2015 Pro Bowl captain). Darren Woodson and Eric Davis served as defensive co-captains for Irvin and Rice respectively, in both cases reuniting two former teammates (Irvin and Woodson were teammates on the Dallas Cowboys from 1992 to 1999, while Rice and Davis played together with the San Francisco 49ers from 1990 to 1995). The Fantasy draft was held January 27 at 7:30 P.M. EST on ESPN2 at Wheeler Army Airfield in Wahiawa, Hawaii as part of an extension to the NFL's military appreciation campaign.

Antrel Rolle

Antrel Rocelious Rolle (born December 16, 1982) is a former American football safety of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Miami, where he was recognized as a unanimous All-American, and was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals eighth overall in the 2005 NFL Draft. Rolle also played for the Chicago Bears and New York Giants, winning Super Bowl XLVI with New York in 2011.

Cameron Jordan

Cameron Tyler Jordan (born July 10, 1989) is an American football defensive end for the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at California, and was drafted by the Saints in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft.

Derrick Johnson

Derrick O’Hara Johnson (born November 22, 1982) is a former American football linebacker. He played college football at the University of Texas at Austin, where he earned consensus All-American honors twice. He was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs with the 15th overall selection in first round the 2005 NFL Draft. In his 13 seasons with the Chiefs, he made four Pro Bowls. He also played a season for the Oakland Raiders.

Earl Thomas

Earl Winty Thomas III (born May 7, 1989) is an American football free safety for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Seattle Seahawks in the first round of the 2010 NFL Draft and would later assist with the team's first Super Bowl victory in Super Bowl XLVIII against the Denver Broncos. He played college football at Texas and received consensus All-American honors.

Eric Berry

Eric Berry (born December 29, 1988) is an American football safety who is a free agent. He played college football at Tennessee, where he was a two-time unanimous All-American and recognized as the best collegiate defensive back in the country. He was then drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs fifth overall in the 2010 NFL Draft. Berry has been voted to the Pro Bowl five times and has been named to the First Team All-Pro three times.

Berry was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma on December 8, 2014. After going through chemotherapy in the offseason and being declared cancer free, Berry came back for the 2015 season and was named to the Pro Bowl, the AP All-Pro team, and was named the 2015 AP Comeback Player of the Year.

Eric Reid

Eric Todd Reid Jr. (born December 10, 1991) is an American football safety for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Louisiana State University (LSU), and received consensus All-American recognition. He was selected by the San Francisco 49ers in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft, with whom he made a Pro Bowl.

J. J. Jansen

Jeffrey Richard "J. J." Jansen (born January 20, 1986) is an American football long snapper for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League (NFL). He was signed by the Green Bay Packers as an undrafted free agent in 2008. He played college football at Notre Dame.

J. J. Watt

Justin James Watt (born March 22, 1989) is an American football defensive end for the Houston Texans of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Texans with the 11th pick in the first round of the 2011 NFL Draft, and played college football at Wisconsin.

Watt received the AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year Award three times in his first five seasons. Although primarily a defensive end, he occasionally shifts to defensive tackle in some situations. He has also taken snaps on offense, catching three touchdown passes during the 2014 season. In 2014, Watt became the first player in NFL history to record two 20+ sack seasons in a career. He holds the Texans' franchise records for both sacks and forced fumbles. In 2017, Sports Illustrated named Watt its Sportsperson of the Year.

Jerry Rice

Jerry Lee Rice Sr (born October 13, 1962) is a retired American football wide receiver who played in the National Football League (NFL), primarily with the San Francisco 49ers. Due to his numerous records, accomplishments and accolades, he is widely regarded as the greatest wide receiver in NFL history.Rice is the career leader in most major statistical categories for wide receivers, including receptions, touchdown receptions, and receiving yards, once being the leader for total yards and touchdowns in a season. He has scored more points than any other non-kicker in NFL history with 1,256. Rice was selected to the Pro Bowl 13 times (1986–1996, 1998, 2002) and named All-Pro 12 times in his 20 NFL seasons. He won three Super Bowls with the 49ers and an AFC Championship with the Oakland Raiders. As of 2017, Rice holds over 100 NFL records, the most of any player by a wide margin. In 1999, The Sporting News listed Rice second behind Jim Brown on its list of "Football's 100 Greatest Players". In 2010, he was chosen by NFL Network's NFL Films production The Top 100: NFL's Greatest Players as the greatest player in NFL history. Rice was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2010 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 2006.

In January 2015, Rice admitted to using Stickum on his gloves saying "I know this might be a little illegal, guys, but you put a little spray, a little Stickum on them, to make sure that texture is a little sticky". Stickum was banned in the NFL in 1981, four years before Rice joined the league.

Justin Houston

Justin Donovan Houston (born January 21, 1989) is an American football linebacker for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Georgia, where he earned All-American honors, and was drafted by the Kansas City Chiefs in the third round of the 2011 NFL Draft. A four-time Pro Bowl selection, he was also named to the All-Pro team in 2014.

Kyle Long

Kyle Howard Long (born December 5, 1988) is an American football guard for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Oregon. Long was drafted by the Bears in the first round of the 2013 NFL Draft.

Louis Vasquez (American football)

Louis Nicholas Vasquez (born April 11, 1987) is a former American football guard. He played college football at Texas Tech, and was drafted by the San Diego Chargers in the third round of the 2009 NFL Draft. He currently coaches the offensive line at Central Catholic Marianist High School in San Antonio, Texas

Matthew Stafford

John Matthew Stafford (born February 7, 1988) is an American football quarterback for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League (NFL). He was raised in Dallas, Texas, and went to Highland Park High School. He attended the University of Georgia, where he played football for the Bulldogs, and was drafted by the Lions first overall in the 2009 NFL Draft.

Stafford is the fourth quarterback in NFL history to throw for over 5,000 yards in a single season, being one of three players to do it in 2011, and is the fastest player in NFL history to reach 30,000 yards in (109 games). Stafford also holds the NFL record for the most comeback wins in a season, recording eight in the 2016 NFL season. In 2017, he signed a $135-million contract extension with the Lions, making him the highest-paid player in NFL history at the time.

NFL Pro Bowl records

This is a list of the NFL Pro Bowl records. As of 2014 Pro Bowl.

Nick Foles

Nicholas Edward Foles (born January 20, 1989) is an American football quarterback for the Jacksonville Jaguars of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Arizona and was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the third round of the 2012 NFL Draft. He has also played for the St. Louis Rams and Kansas City Chiefs.

Foles played his first game with the Eagles in Week 10 of the 2012 season after Michael Vick left with an injury. Foles then made his first start the following week. In Week 9 of the 2013 season, he became the second quarterback to post a perfect passer rating (158.3) while passing for more than 400 yards, and also the first quarterback in NFL history to post a perfect passer rating and throw seven touchdowns in a single game. It was the 60th time in NFL history that a perfect passer rating was achieved overall.

After stints with the Rams and the Chiefs, Foles returned to the Eagles in 2017. After Carson Wentz was injured late in the regular season, Foles led the Eagles to the franchise's third Super Bowl appearance. The Eagles defeated the New England Patriots in Super Bowl LII for their first Super Bowl title, and Foles was named the game's MVP.

Tyron Smith

Tyron Jerrar Smith (born December 12, 1990) is an American football offensive tackle for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at USC where he won the Morris Trophy, recognizing the best offensive and defensive linemen on the West Coast, in 2010. Smith was drafted by the Cowboys with the ninth overall pick in the 2011 NFL Draft.

Scoring summary
Quarter Time Drive Team Scoring information Score
Plays Yards TOP RIC SAN
1 10:10 5 74 2:50 SAN Jackson 36-yard touchdown reception from Luck, Tucker kick good 0 7
2 9:05 7 55 3:25 RIC Graham 8-yard touchdown reception from Brees, Gostkowski kick good 7 7
2 5:42 4 7 2:08 SAN Newton 1-yard touchdown run, Tucker kick good 7 14
2 0:36 7 58 1:56 RIC Gordon 10-yard touchdown run, Gostkowski kick good 14 14
4 4:41 5 57 2:39 SAN Cameron 12-yard touchdown reception from Foles, Tucker kick good 14 21
4 0:41 4 26 0:19 RIC Murray 20-yard touchdown reception from Smith, 2-point Tolbert run good 22 21
"TOP" = time of possession. For other American football terms, see Glossary of American football. 22 21
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